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Exploding Shimano Hyperglide chains

Old 01-26-11, 09:34 PM
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Exploding Shimano Hyperglide chains

I have come to the conclusion that Hyperglides suck. I have blown up two chains in a year on two different bikes. I almost went down hard the other day. I posted this on a blog and started to hear "yeah I had the same problem". I have never had a Sedis or HKK break.

I was using a 6-7 speed Hyperglide on a 5 speed Sunrace freewheel. I never "cross-chain", I am aware of that issue with these chains. I keep them well lubed and clean, always.

I am running a better quality Shimano IG on this bike now, the chain does look a lot better structurally. But I might swap it out.

Most of my stuff is "old school', but what gets the nod these days for a strong chain? I don't care what it weighs.

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Old 01-26-11, 09:52 PM
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I've never broken a chain but I like SRAM for price and the removable link. Don't see Sedis or YKK anywhere, is that C&V ?
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Old 01-26-11, 10:14 PM
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Do you shift under load? That's tough on chains and can eventually cause them to fail. The only chains I've ever broken were old rusty ones I shouldn't have been using anyway.
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Old 01-26-11, 10:57 PM
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Chains fail because of

1) Shifting under extreme load
2) Installation of install pin fail
3) Extreme wear

Trust me, you ain't breaking no chains if hushovd ain't. Manufacturing defects are similarly rare.
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Old 01-27-11, 12:37 AM
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How did the chain brake? Sometimes you can see that the pin has failed looking the way it broke and assume it was caused by a poor instalation.
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Old 01-27-11, 12:58 AM
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I hope the OP is not trying to "shill" for the other poster a few days back who "seemed" to be trying to look for any excuse to start up some kinda class-action suit for a pure wear-and-tear part...

=8-)
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Old 01-27-11, 01:24 AM
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Originally Posted by mrrabbit
I hope the OP is not trying to "shill" for the other poster a few days back who "seemed" to be trying to look for any excuse to start up some kinda class-action suit for a pure wear-and-tear part...

=8-)
This forum attracts all sorts of confirmation bias idiots here. Sigh.

I doubt it anyways. The other dude seemed to think there is some glaring defect in all shimano new 10s chains that he is only aware of and only he has experienced.
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Old 01-27-11, 02:11 AM
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I've broken a few chains, always when I've installed them quickly, when I knew something wasn't quite right, but I rode it anyway. I've never had a chain brake 'just riding along' that I didn't install properly (Ok, I'm apparently stupid, but it seemed like a good idea at the time).
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Old 01-27-11, 06:59 AM
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Did you soak the chain in a de-greaser and remove all the factory lube? That seems to be a common data point for cronic chain breakers.
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Old 01-27-11, 08:34 AM
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Does a 6-7 speed chain fit properly on a 5 speed freewheel? Wouldn't the cogs be too wide for the chain and maybe cause too much wear over time?
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Old 01-27-11, 08:47 AM
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+1 agree with rankin116. Good example how new dosen't always work with old-specs is specs.
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Old 01-27-11, 08:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr IGH
Did you soak the chain in a de-greaser and remove all the factory lube? That seems to be a common data point for cronic chain breakers.
Degreasing a chain (and reapplying lube) does nothing to the chain nor its parts. If the chain breaks because of wear, the factory lubrication is loooooong gone and there are too many other factors to consider the cause of the failure to be degreasing. Chain failure...especially chain breakage...is caused by improper installation in almost all cases if it isn't caused by a manufacturing problem.

HKK chains (YKK is a zipper manufacturer) had a very bad batch of chains several years ago that failed with regularity due to a manufacturing problem.
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Old 01-27-11, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute
Degreasing a chain (and reapplying lube) does nothing to the chain nor its parts....
Nothing ruins a chain quicker or more certainly than removing the factory lube and oiling it with some home-brewed crap. Links start sticking/siezing, next thing ya know, the chain breaks. I pity the silly fools who think they know more than SRAM/Shimano, OTOH, it is kinda funny they spend time/effort/chemicals to ruin a new chain, takes all kinds
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Old 01-27-11, 09:56 AM
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Chain breakage is the pins separating from the side plates.
This has nothing to do with lubrication.
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Old 01-27-11, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by operator
Chains fail because of

1) Shifting under extreme load
2) Installation of install pin fail
3) Extreme wear

Trust me, you ain't breaking no chains if hushovd ain't. Manufacturing defects are similarly rare.
1) No
2)No
3) No
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Old 01-27-11, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by mrrabbit
I hope the OP is not trying to "shill" for the other poster a few days back who "seemed" to be trying to look for any excuse to start up some kinda class-action suit for a pure wear-and-tear part...

=8-)

Oh God,......No.
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Old 01-27-11, 10:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr IGH
Did you soak the chain in a de-greaser and remove all the factory lube? That seems to be a common data point for cronic chain breakers.

LOL No.

And I didn't bash it with bricks, heat it in the oven....
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Old 01-27-11, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr IGH
Nothing ruins a chain quicker or more certainly than removing the factory lube and oiling it with some home-brewed crap. Links start sticking/siezing, next thing ya know, the chain breaks. I pity the silly fools who think they know more than SRAM/Shimano, OTOH, it is kinda funny they spend time/effort/chemicals to ruin a new chain, takes all kinds

That's ridiculous.
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Old 01-27-11, 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by juls
+1 agree with rankin116. Good example how new dosen't always work with old-specs is specs.

I bought the chain at REI from a "certified" mechanic who previously owned his own shop for years, and has been to Barnett's school. He said the 6-7 speed would be fine, I asked him about widths. He said this is what they used to replace chains on all vintage bikes, they did not even carry Sedis or HKK.

Last edited by IknowURider; 01-27-11 at 07:45 PM.
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Old 01-27-11, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by IknowURider
1) No
2)No
3) No
You really don't think pin installation is a source of chain breakage?
I'll put money down that it is the the #1 cause.
A replacement pin is not the same as the factory-installed pins.
I haven't had a chain break since the '90's when I stopped using replacement pins and started using SRAM 8s links with a Shimano IG 8s chain.

Since then I've used Shimano/Campy/SRAM chains with Superlinks/SRAM links, and never had a breakage.
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Old 01-27-11, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Shimagnolo
You really don't think pin installation is a source of chain breakage?
I'll put money down that it is the the #1 cause.
A replacement pin is not the same as the factory-installed pins.
I haven't had a chain break since the '90's when I stopped using replacement pins and started using SRAM 8s links with a Shimano IG 8s chain.

Since then I've used Shimano/Campy/SRAM chains with Superlinks/SRAM links, and never had a breakage.
I didn't use replacement pins, just the standard method of moving the pin to the side. I never had a problem with other chains in doing this. I also go very slowly in the process, make sure the breaker pin is going in on center and perfectly straight, and use some lube on the pin before moving it. I use a park Tools breaker, not a crappy Wal-mart tool.

if you could post the model numbers or links for those chains and links i'll take a look at them. I saw a SRAM link once, it just didn't look too sturdy, but maybe it was an older model.
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Old 01-27-11, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by IknowURider
I didn't use replacement pins, just the standard method of moving the pin to the side. I never had a problem with other chains in doing this.
This may be your problem. Older chains would survive this "standard" method but not new ones and new means 8-speed and above. You said you are using a 6/7-speed Hyperglide chain but are you sure it isn't a 6/7/8-speed chain? If so, it requires the special joining pin and the original pins must be pushed completely out and discarded when you separate the chain.

I've never had ANY chain break and I've been using HG/IG chains since the early '90's and typically get 6000 miles or more (sometimes a lot more) on every chain. But, I always use Shimano's specific joining pin, never the original pin to reconnect the chain.
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Old 01-27-11, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr IGH
Nothing ruins a chain quicker or more certainly than removing the factory lube and oiling it with some home-brewed crap. Links start sticking/siezing, next thing ya know, the chain breaks. I pity the silly fools who think they know more than SRAM/Shimano, OTOH, it is kinda funny they spend time/effort/chemicals to ruin a new chain, takes all kinds
Just how long do you think the factory lubrication lasts? A hundred miles, a thousand miles, 10,000 miles? At some point you are going to have to add something to the chain to keep it moving freely and shifting properly. Adding anything to lubricate the chain involves some kind of carrier solvent...those nasty chemicals...than flushes the factory lubrication from the chain. On the second or third or fourth application of a chain lubricant, the factory lubrication will have been completely replaced.

Or do you just use a chain until it gets a little dirty and then replace it?

Originally Posted by Shimagnolo
Chain breakage is the pins separating from the side plates.
This has nothing to do with lubrication.
Yup. Chain wear, i.e. the pins wearing against the plates resulting in chain stretch may be due to lubrication but plate separation and chain breakage aren't.
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Old 01-27-11, 03:00 PM
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Originally Posted by IknowURider
I was using a 6-7 speed Hyperglide on a 5 speed Sunrace freewheel.
From what I can tell, Shimano does not currently offer any 6/7 speed chains. They only offer 6/7/8 speed chains and by virtue of including 8 speed in the description the chain must be a flush rivet chain. As has been mentioned already, you CANNOT break and rejoin a flush rivet chain using the same pin. You must use the special Shimano joining pin and then never remove that pin again (or discard the links it was used in).

I've also never broken a chain. I've used Shimano, SRAM, and KMC chains in 8, 9, and 10 speed variants.
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Old 01-27-11, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by IknowURider
I didn't use replacement pins, just the standard method of moving the pin to the side. I never had a problem with other chains in doing this. I also go very slowly in the process, make sure the breaker pin is going in on center and perfectly straight, and use some lube on the pin before moving it. I use a park Tools breaker, not a crappy Wal-mart tool.

if you could post the model numbers or links for those chains and links i'll take a look at them. I saw a SRAM link once, it just didn't look too sturdy, but maybe it was an older model.
do that with a modern chain and it will fail
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