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Chain skipping on one cog only - (old campy components)

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Chain skipping on one cog only - (old campy components)

Old 06-19-11, 10:30 AM
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Kurious Oranj
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Chain skipping on one cog only - (old campy components)

I have a little problem with an old steel Pinarello I recently acquired. It has 1970s Campy Super Record components but I am completely new to Campy having always used Shimano. I recently got a new chain and after that I noticed that the chain seems to skip on cog #3 only when under load (6 cog cassette). The first thing that came to my mind was worn cogs that became noticeable after changing the chain but I can't see that #3 is any different than the rest of them that don't skip.

Any ideas?
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Old 06-19-11, 10:34 AM
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You probably use #3 the most, although it may look fine. Get a new freewheel.
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Old 06-19-11, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Homebrew01 View Post
You probably use #3 the most, although it may look fine. Get a new freewheel.
That makes sense. Any ideas where to get old Campy stuff. Ebay?
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Old 06-19-11, 10:44 AM
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That's the challenge when you change a chain. In my experience, most of the time, I will end up changing the freewheel as well.

Some report success with using a Shimano freewheel on an Italian threaded hub. I have never done it, but I do not have any Campy stuff. Search is your friend.

From an old thread (quote from TMar) "Regarding the Italian/English freewheels compatibility issue, our rule of thumb was that you could place an English threaded freewheel on an Italian theaded hub (or vica-versa), so long as you did not later revert to a freewheel with threading that matched the hub."

Last edited by wrk101; 06-19-11 at 10:54 AM.
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Old 06-19-11, 11:10 AM
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In all likelihood the bike has ISO freewheel threads. Campy had been using them on all hubs not intended for the Italian domestic market since the mid sixties.

Any 6s freewheel will work, and if you don't have index you could also use a 7s (which is the same overall width). There is a subtle difference between most Italian freewheels and Shimano or Sun Tour, and that's the position of the innermost sprocket with respect to the hub's F/W shoulder. The Italian freewheels used LH threaded sprockets screwed on from the back to have the innermost sprocket on the same plane as the body.

Shimano and ST used splined on sprockets, loaded from the right up to a shoulder. As a result the sprocket is a bit outboard of the back of the body pushing the entire system to the right about 1mm. Sometimes this causes problems with right dropout clearance, but it's easily corrected by respacing the axle.

BTW- I have a bunch of Regina and Sun Tour freewheels, but they're mostly of narrow range. email me at info at Chain-L if you're interested.
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Old 06-19-11, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Kurious Oranj View Post
That makes sense. Any ideas where to get old Campy stuff. Ebay?
Is it actually a Campagnolo freewheel? Those were never very common due to expense and short-lived aluminum cogs.

You can replace whatever freewheel you currently have with another of any brand with the proper threading. I'd recommend one with hyperglide tooth profile as these shift quite nicely with old friction systems.
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Old 06-19-11, 01:07 PM
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Regarding the freewheel threads on the hub, one way you can tell if the threads are English (ISO) on older Nuovo Record hubs is by a narrow groove that encircles the hub shell just beneath the threads. The presence of this groove was Campy's way of indicating English threading. I believe later Nuovo Record hubs may have had the type of threading stamped (written) on the hub shell, perhaps?

Here's one of my Nuovo Record hubs, circa 1972, you can see the groove that indicates English threading easily:



And here's one from '71, the hub's a little cleaner and it's harder to see the groove, but it's there:

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Old 06-19-11, 02:10 PM
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Thanks for all the advice. I don't even know if it is a Campagnolo freewheel to be honest. Will check that. I hope I can find a freewheel but keep the rest of the old nice parts. I am slowly learning to repair/maintain this vintage stuff.

Earlier this year I had some problems with the rear derailleur when it all of a sudden refused to shift to the smallest cog but after removing it and oiling it all up and increasing the spring tension it started working again.
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Old 06-19-11, 02:27 PM
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I hope for your sake it isn't a Campagnolo freewheel, though as JohnThompson said, they're very rare. the reason I say I hope not is that Campagnolo freewheels take special and unique freewheel remover with two helical prongs, and nothing else will fit.

Not many shops have these, and when I made them some 30 years ago they cost roughly 4 times what a standard 2 prong remover cost.

Finding a standard 6s freewheel will be easy enough once the original is removed. If it's a Regina or Everest, using a 2 -prong remover, be sure to get one with good fit, and keep it securely in place with the QR skewer. If not they slip easily, destroying the raised ring and making removal much harder. (

BTW- don't forget to back off the QR nut once the F/W breaks loose, otherwise unscrewing it will lengthen or snap the skewer.
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Old 06-19-11, 02:58 PM
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So your saying my old Campy freewheel tool (the one with the long handle) may be worth some money??
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Old 06-19-11, 03:07 PM
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Originally Posted by jeepr View Post
So your saying my old Campy freewheel tool (the one with the long handle) may be worth some money??
Absolutely, there weren't that many sold in the first place, and it's a beautiful example of great design badly timed (cassettes took over soon after). I have one of the Campy's and only a few of my old Kingsbridge's left. I'm sure there are also a few Bicycle Research out there too.

Unfortunately, unless the opportunity to rent one to someone desperate to remove a vintage Campy freewheel arises, the tool only has value to collectors.
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Old 06-19-11, 07:25 PM
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I helped a friend who had bought a nice old European steel bike at a police auction. It was Campy Record with 52-42 chainrings and a 12-21 6-speed freewheel (not Campy). It needed a new chain and the owner needed lower gearing. I got a 7-speed freewheel from my LBS with larger cogs but found that the axle wasn't quiet long enough for the 7-speed. The LBS had one in stock that was a few mm longer so I used that with new bearings and it worked great. The owner really appreciated the lower gearing, unfortunately the crankset would not accept a smaller chainring.
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Old 06-19-11, 07:37 PM
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Suntour Ultra-7 freewheels fit in the space of a 6 speed, That's what I used back in the day.

Originally Posted by jeepr View Post
So your saying my old Campy freewheel tool (the one with the long handle) may be worth some money??
I sold mine on Ebay a while back .... don't remember how much .... $30 - 40 maybe ?
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Old 06-19-11, 08:55 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
I hope for your sake it isn't a Campagnolo freewheel, though as JohnThompson said, they're very rare. the reason I say I hope not is that Campagnolo freewheels take special and unique freewheel remover with two helical prongs, and nothing else will fit.

Not many shops have these, and when I made them some 30 years ago they cost roughly 4 times what a standard 2 prong remover cost.
FWIW, Bicycle Research makes an affordable version:

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Old 06-19-11, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by jeepr View Post
So your saying my old Campy freewheel tool (the one with the long handle) may be worth some money??
It depends.

The vast majority of the #704 tools were designed for the old 2-prong Regina freewheels, and require an insert to work with freewheels having a 13T small cog.

The ones with the helical prongs for Campagnolo's freewheel are much scarcer and more valuable.
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