Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Old bike with 27" tires, can I go 700c?

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Old bike with 27" tires, can I go 700c?

Old 08-16-11, 07:57 AM
  #1  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 41
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Old bike with 27" tires, can I go 700c?

I bought a used bike, it has a set of specialized tires, 27 x 1 1/4".

I was hoping to stick a pair of 700c x 32mm on them.

Do you think this is possible? The rim says it's an ambrosia and has 27 x 1 1/4" stamped on it along with 630 x 18 .

It looks like there is a bit of room for a bigger width tire. Not sure about height, can I adjust where the brakes sit on the frame to accomodate the smaller 700c?
goingmissing is offline  
Old 08-16-11, 08:09 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 425
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You cannon install 700c tires on your 630 rims. You need 622 (700c) rims/wheels to install 700c tires. If you have enough brake reach, you can do it.
krome is offline  
Old 08-16-11, 08:12 AM
  #3  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 41
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
you just said I can't, and then I can. which is it?

I think the brakes looks they they could reach the extra 4 mm.
goingmissing is offline  
Old 08-16-11, 08:21 AM
  #4  
The Left Coast, USA
 
FrenchFit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3,757

Bikes: Bulls, Bianchi, Koga, Trek, Miyata

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 361 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by goingmissing
you just said I can't, and then I can. which is it?

I think the brakes looks they they could reach the extra 4 mm.
krome says you can't use your 700 tires with 27 rims. You can use 622 rims with your 700 tires, i.e. a new wheelset, if your brakes will reach.
FrenchFit is offline  
Old 08-16-11, 08:22 AM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 33,656

Bikes: '96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '20 Surly Midnight Special, All are 3x10. It is hilly around here!

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2026 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1,095 Times in 741 Posts
Originally Posted by goingmissing
you just said I can't, and then I can. which is it?

I think the brakes looks they they could reach the extra 4 mm.
He said it correctly, he just didn't emphasize what was required.

First, you CANNOT install 700c tires on 27" rims. The 700c tires fit a 622 mm rim and 27" tires fit a 630 mm rim and they are completely non-interchangable. You need entirely new wheels or, at a minimum, to relace your current hubs to 700c rims.

Second, if you do obtain a 700c wheel set and tires, your current brakes may or may not adjust down the needed 4 mm to align with the new, smaller diameter rims.

Before doing anything, borrow a set of 700c wheels and try them in your frame to see if the brake adjustment will be adequate.
HillRider is offline  
Old 08-16-11, 08:36 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
TallRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 4,454
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 128 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
the other question is, how much value do you get out of changing your wheelset to the more modern standard? 27" tires continue to be available and probably will be for a long time, although not for nicer models of tires.
Reasons to change:
- nicer, more expensive tires available for 700c standard
- chance at a new, lighter, more expensive wheelset

Reasons not to change:
- cost
- hassle of making sure the gearing on your current bike will transfer over to whatever wheels you use as replacement

Three of my bikes have 27" wheels and I've felt no need to change them. I actually built new rear wheels for two of them using 7-speed freehubs, which will fit the 126mm rear triangle spacing common in bikes of the era that have 27" wheels.
__________________
"c" is not a unit that measures tire width
TallRider is offline  
Old 08-16-11, 08:44 AM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Trakhak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 5,332
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2462 Post(s)
Liked 2,926 Times in 1,664 Posts
If your 27" Specialized tires are a true 1 1/4" wide, that's equivalent to 32 mm. If you want more tire width, you can find 27" x 1 3/8" if you look around.
Trakhak is offline  
Old 08-16-11, 10:09 AM
  #8  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,355 Times in 862 Posts
You replace the wheels.. , then with 700c rims on those wheels , you choose tires.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 08-17-11, 12:41 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 104
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by TallRider
the other question is, how much value do you get out of changing your wheelset to the more modern standard? 27" tires continue to be available and probably will be for a long time, although not for nicer models of tires.
Reasons to change:
- nicer, more expensive tires available for 700c standard
- chance at a new, lighter, more expensive wheelset

Reasons not to change:
- cost
- hassle of making sure the gearing on your current bike will transfer over to whatever wheels you use as replacement

Three of my bikes have 27" wheels and I've felt no need to change them. I actually built new rear wheels for two of them using 7-speed freehubs, which will fit the 126mm rear triangle spacing common in bikes of the era that have 27" wheels.
I recently changed wheels from 27" to 700c on my vintage bike. First, make sure you have long reach caliper brakes. Second, after changing, my ride is more sporty but not as smooth. I am using Conti GP4000s. So, whether you should change depends a lot on what type of ride quality you want. Looks wise, the bike looks a tad more modern with 700c. YMMV there.
etane is offline  
Old 08-17-11, 01:38 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
jbkirby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Dothan, AL
Posts: 264

Bikes: 1971 Raleigh International; 1972 Raleigh International; 1971 Schwinn Sports Tourer

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
I have identical Raleigh Internationals, one a 1972, the other a 1971. One has Weinmann concave 700c rims with 700 x 23C tires and the other has Weinmann concave 27" rims with 27 x 1 1/8 tires. As previously stated, the 700s ride much rougher but provide better response and handling with lower rolling resistance. The 27" tires are smoother-riding and much more comfortable on long rides, but lower tire pressures mean more rolling resistance. Another caveat: If I want to convert my Weinmann center-pull brakes to Campy Record long reach side pulls, it is possible with the 27" rims, but impossible with 700s. Each set of rims has its own set of advantages and disadvantages.
jbkirby is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
thehammerdog
Bicycle Mechanics
34
09-28-14 11:05 AM
MTBerJim
Bicycle Mechanics
22
04-18-11 05:51 PM
Geo Cruise
Bicycle Mechanics
5
11-30-10 01:40 PM
RoboIsGod
Classic & Vintage
6
03-20-10 07:30 AM
X'igaa Kaa
Bicycle Mechanics
32
02-09-10 08:49 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.