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Park Tools set, repair stand and book. good buy?

Old 09-21-11, 03:44 PM
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Park Tools set, repair stand and book. good buy?

I went to get into wrenching my own bike. I figure I've given enough money to the LBS, sometimes they're so fast that it seems fairly easy. I found this on Park Tools Mechanic Tool Kit AK-37 on Amazon for $207 and the Big Blue Book and the Repair Tool set. It would qualify for free shipping and be tax-free...for now. The total would be $362. Is this a good buy or could I find better else where? I mean, would the tools included be useful or are there things that are fairly useless? Is it better to buy the tools individually as needed?
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Old 09-21-11, 04:50 PM
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You will already have half of the tools if you have a mechanics or household toolset. Unless you want to spend time hunting down sales online or on Craigslist, it seems like a pretty decent deal.
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Old 09-21-11, 05:00 PM
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it a good deal .
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Old 09-21-11, 05:17 PM
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I saw the same deal and purchased it . . .$100 less than anyone else offered. It's a good set; could you get a less-expensive set and do the work - of course! (Nashbar has a kit they sell) I'm happy with my purchase and now a selection of my Park Tools reside in my Feedback Sports Pro Ultralight Tool Tray. I'm curious why your total is so high? I purchased the AK-37, the BBB-2 ($19.99) and the Park Tool TM-1 Tension meter ($56.95) and my total bill was $284.71 . . . why is your total $362?
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Old 09-21-11, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by pmartin4665
I saw the same deal and purchased it . . .$100 less than anyone else offered. It's a good set; could you get a less-expensive set and do the work - of course! (Nashbar has a kit they sell) I'm happy with my purchase and now a selection of my Park Tools reside in my Feedback Sports Pro Ultralight Tool Tray. I'm curious why your total is so high? I purchased the AK-37, the BBB-2 ($19.99) and the Park Tool TM-1 Tension meter ($56.95) and my total bill was $284.71 . . . why is your total $362?
Oh okay, I think the difference is in the repair stand. I'm looking at this one and it's $135. I'll check out the TM-1. Is that a repair stand? Nevermind, it isn't a repair stand.
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Old 09-21-11, 08:17 PM
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3 options for repair stands

This for $98 or this one for $135 or this one for $245?

My inclination is not to cheap out but not to go for something that is more than I need. Feel free to recommend the stand you use, too, whatever the brand.
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Old 09-21-11, 09:38 PM
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I have the PCS 10 and it works fine.
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Old 09-21-11, 09:59 PM
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I mean, would the tools included be useful or are there things that are fairly useless? Is it better to buy the tools individually as needed?
Buy them as you need them unless you have enough different bikes you're going to be using enough of the tools it makes sense.

As a Shimano/SRAM guy you don't need a Campagnolo cassette tool and vise-versa.

With modern self extracting cranks you don't need a crank puller.

Your cone wrench needs will vary radically. I have hubs which take no cone wrenches to service, one 17mm wrench, a pair of 14mm wrenches, and a pair of 15mm wrenches.

If you only use high quality European nipples you only need a black spoke wrench.

In some cases you may also want a different tool. A 15" ruler does well for checking chain wear. I use a torque wrench on my modern bottom brackets and would get socket style tools instead.
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Old 09-21-11, 11:56 PM
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The Big Blue Book is great for reference but wish is came in a spiral bound so it lays flat on the work bench.
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Old 09-22-11, 12:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt
Buy them as you need them unless you have enough different bikes you're going to be using enough of the tools it makes sense.

As a Shimano/SRAM guy you don't need a Campagnolo cassette tool and vise-versa.

With modern self extracting cranks you don't need a crank puller.

Your cone wrench needs will vary radically. I have hubs which take no cone wrenches to service, one 17mm wrench, a pair of 14mm wrenches, and a pair of 15mm wrenches.

If you only use high quality European nipples you only need a black spoke wrench.

In some cases you may also want a different tool. A 15" ruler does well for checking chain wear. I use a torque wrench on my modern bottom brackets and would get socket style tools instead.
Okay, that makes sense. I'd be upset if I had bunch of tools I didn't even need. I think I'll just get the stand and book and buy tools as needed. Right now all I have is my stupid bulky multi-tool. Mostly I use the hex keys. I wouldn't know what to buy individually to start with. I just feel like I'm always at the bike shop cos they have something I don't. Then I pay $10 to have them use their special tool for a minute or two. I'm sure I could be saving myself money. What tools would you say are basic? I wish I could change pedals for whatever reason, and my rear cassette, too but that would involve changing out the derailleur and I don't know how complicated that gets. Maybe I'll just get that blue book to get an idea of what a basic set of tools looks like.
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Old 09-22-11, 01:54 AM
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If you are going to pay $245 for the psc 4 repair stand, you may as well pay a little extra for the same stand with a different clamp. I don't know what it is off of the top of my head. I am at work the stand is at home. It's a micro adjustable clamp but I don't have the exact name and number. It costs like $40 more. It is a great stand as far as I'm concerned.
IMHO, just buy the tools and be done with it. You won't regret it.
I would buy the park tool brand because the tools hold up.
In five years you won't remember or care whether you could have gotten the tools a little cheaper.
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Old 09-22-11, 02:18 AM
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The stand is like the psc 4 only with a clamp like this [minus the wall connection parts]

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Park-Tool-PR...item3f0e3824fc
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Old 09-22-11, 09:19 AM
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Originally Posted by albertmoreno
Okay, that makes sense. I'd be upset if I had bunch of tools I didn't even need. I think I'll just get the stand and book and buy tools as needed. Right now all I have is my stupid bulky multi-tool. Mostly I use the hex keys. I wouldn't know what to buy individually to start with. I just feel like I'm always at the bike shop cos they have something I don't. Then I pay $10 to have them use their special tool for a minute or two. I'm sure I could be saving myself money. What tools would you say are basic? I wish I could change pedals for whatever reason, and my rear cassette, too but that would involve changing out the derailleur and I don't know how complicated that gets. Maybe I'll just get that blue book to get an idea of what a basic set of tools looks like.
A good set of allen wrenches, cone wrenches, crank puller (unless your bike doesn't require it), bottom bracket tool to match your bike, cassette tool to match your bike, chain whip, chain tool, spoke wrench, good tire levers, open end wrench set, screwdrivers and a pedal wrench would be a good start. You can add to it as you find the need (or work on different bikes). Performance Bike has decent quality tools (Spin Doctor) that are reasonably priced (if you catch them on a good sale, they are almost giving some of them away).

And the PSC-10 would be my choice for a stand (it is what I have). Works great, very sturdy and the clamp has a cam action to make it a little easier to deal with than the next cheaper Park stand.
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Old 09-22-11, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by albertmoreno
Okay, that makes sense. I'd be upset if I had bunch of tools I didn't even need. I think I'll just get the stand and book and buy tools as needed. Right now all I have is my stupid bulky multi-tool. Mostly I use the hex keys. I wouldn't know what to buy individually to start with. I just feel like I'm always at the bike shop cos they have something I don't. Then I pay $10 to have them use their special tool for a minute or two. I'm sure I could be saving myself money. What tools would you say are basic? I wish I could change pedals for whatever reason, and my rear cassette, too but that would involve changing out the derailleur and I don't know how complicated that gets. Maybe I'll just get that blue book to get an idea of what a basic set of tools looks like.
spoke wrench (should only be needed when you bend a rim, take it with you on rides), chain tool (it'll keep you from being stranded, take it with you with a master link) 5/6mm hex key for adjustments (take it with you), cassette tool, chain whip.

some rims need tire levers, some don't.

If you have cup and cone bearings you'll need the right cone wrenches.

At some point you'll wear out pedals (may need a pedal wrench, may be fine with an 8mm hex key) and bottom bracket (need appropriate bottom bracket tools and crank pullers which vary).

An 8mm hex key socket (torque tends to be high and you want to use your torque wrench) is a good idea. An offset wrench for brake adjustment is nice but not essential.
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Old 09-22-11, 03:19 PM
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You can always take the park blue book to kinkos or some place similar and have them cut the spine, punch small holes, and add a spiral binding.

-j
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Old 09-22-11, 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Greenfieldja
You can always take the park blue book to kinkos or some place similar and have them cut the spine, punch small holes, and add a spiral binding.

-j
that's not a bad idea. I've had the same issue.
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Old 09-22-11, 06:48 PM
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Take the Big Blue Book down to Kinkos and they will spiral bind it for you at a reasonable cost. bk
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Old 09-23-11, 08:08 AM
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I just buy them as I need them, I wouldn't start at the LBS for tools though, I'd start at the hardware store. It's usually cheaper since it's not bike specific. Start with a quality metric hex key set, metric socket and ratchet set (if you need it) and a good torque wrench (again if you need it and wait for it to go on sale, if your bike is not carbon I wouldn't bother), a good quality cable cutter and the usual screwdrivers, pliers and tool box.
Then to the LBS, start with a 4th hand tool for adjusting your brakes and cables, chain breaker, wrenches, sometimes tools do double duty, my chain whip also doubles as a pedal wrench. After that I would get tools as I need them. But think about the tool you're going to buy before you buy. Like will you ever use it again? How much does it cost? If it's a tool I'll use rarely, but it's under $20, I'll buy it. If it's more, I'll just let the shop do it, or bring it by the co-op.
I don't have a stand, I'd like one, but I just put my bike on a trainer and that doubles as a stand. I like double duty things, keeps it less cluttered.
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Old 09-23-11, 12:57 PM
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I bought Zinn's book of bike maintenance. Then I bought tools as I needed them for jobs. best way to go much cheaper. I did throw down for the Ultimate stand now called Feedback sports. Worth every penny.

https://feedbacksports.com/shop/default.aspx




this is the one I got
https://feedbacksports.com/shop/Pro-C...-Stand-P4.aspx
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