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Flatted twice installing a tire -- what did I do wrong

Old 11-11-11, 03:17 AM
  #1  
jsdavis
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Flatted twice installing a tire -- what did I do wrong

Admittedly I haven't installed a tire in years because I haven't ridden much in the past 4 or 5 years until Jan 2011.

I only had one bead off the rim to start. I took the patched tube and inflated it and put a bit of air in it to give it some shape -- just enough for it to hold its round shape without bending. I inserted the valve into the hole and then proceed to put the tube under the tire.

After the tube was inserted fully, I went to seat the tire. I seated all but a foot or so of bead by hand and then had to use the levers. When I went to put air into the tire, I found that it would not hold air at all. I had to pull the tube back out and patch the tube.

This ended up happening a second time before I was able to successfully mount the tire back. Did I do something wrong?
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Old 11-11-11, 03:32 AM
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You've not given much detail about the holes in the tube, did you have more than one hole in the first place, like a snakebite?

Did you find what caused the orginal flat, maybe the cause was still in the tire?

Otherwise, the process you have decribed to fix the tube sounds fine.
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Old 11-11-11, 04:18 AM
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The first hole was caused by a staple which was removed from the tire. The staple caused only one hole.

I'm not sure what caused the second and third flats but they were not in the same location and there was no noticeable object that would cause a flat at those locations. The second flat was about 3cm from the valve stem, and the third was about 1/3 the circumference away.

I am not familiar with a snake bite.
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Old 11-11-11, 05:56 AM
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A snakebite is two identical punctures on opposite side of the tube not what you had from the sound of it.

from Sheldon Brown

'Pinch Cuts result from hitting stones, curbs, or sharp edges of holes in the road surface. When the tire hits a sharp edge hard enough, it compresses so that it bottoms out. The inner tube can get pinched between the rock and the rim. Pinch cuts usually put two small holes in the tube. This type of damage is sometimes called a "snake bite" because the two holes look like the wound made by the fangs of a snake.
Pinch cuts sometimes ruin tires as well as tubes, but usually the tire will not be damaged.
The impact that causes a pinch cut can also make a dent or "blip" in your rim.' https://sheldonbrown.com/flats.html

I've had similar to you, when I fix one, and another just appeared for no reason, thinking tho that the first one fixed was leaking most air, and the others were there, just not leaking as much, so weren't as noticable. once fixed they havn't re-appeared, so in your case wouldn't worry about it.
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Old 11-11-11, 06:41 AM
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Don't use levers. Use the low part of your palm to roll the tire onto the wheel. It will be slow if the tire is unforgiving, such as a wire-bead tire. On some tires, I've had to get it as far as I could, then leave it for an hour before trying more.
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Old 11-11-11, 07:56 AM
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The central part of the rim has a small valley. If you can massage the tyre bead into this valley you will get enough slack to pop the bead over the rim.
Make sure the "difficult" bit of tyre bead is directly opposite the valve. Grab handfulls of tyre at the valve and squeeze, working your way towards the tight bit. Check that the inner tube does not get trapped between tyre bead and rim. On very tight tyres, you can keep the bead inside the valley using toe clips, zipties etc to maintain the squeeze. Push the valve in a bit to ensure the bead is seated under the valve.
Some tyres go on by hand, others do need a bit of gentle persuation with tyre levers but take care not to case snaebites.
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Old 11-11-11, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by p2templin View Post
Don't use levers. Use the low part of your palm to roll the tire onto the wheel. It will be slow if the tire is unforgiving, such as a wire-bead tire. On some tires, I've had to get it as far as I could, then leave it for an hour before trying more.

Right. Also, using talc to lubricate the tube and tire bead makes it much easier to mount and unmount tires and helps reduce the chance of catching and pinching the tube. If you don't use a lever, it's very unlikely you'll damage a tube when mounting a tire. Sometimes warming the tire up a bit in direct sunlight or in a clothes drier will help with particularly refractory tires.
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Old 11-11-11, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Looigi View Post
Right. Also, using talc to lubricate the tube and tire bead makes it much easier to mount and unmount tires and helps reduce the chance of catching and pinching the tube. If you don't use a lever, it's very unlikely you'll damage a tube when mounting a tire. Sometimes warming the tire up a bit in direct sunlight or in a clothes drier will help with particularly refractory tires.

I've never understood all of the warnings against using tire levers. In my 44 years, I've never damaged a tube or tire using levers, in spite of having several rim/tire combos that were very, very tough to get on - even with the levers.

Sure, you can pinch the tube if you're not careful. The solution? Be careful. It's not rocket science.
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Old 11-11-11, 10:17 AM
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After you get most of the tire on the rim,let the air out of the tube,give you some more room.If you have to use levers,insert iron,pinch the tire next to where the iron is,that will help move the tube away from the bead,less chance of levering on the tube.Use some lube,soapy water,talc,spit,something.
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Old 11-11-11, 11:40 PM
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I had about a foot of bead that I was unable to wrestle on to the rim with my bare hands. I guess what I did was pinch the tube with the lever or the tire bead.
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Old 11-12-11, 01:27 AM
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Originally Posted by jsdavis View Post
I had about a foot of bead that I was unable to wrestle on to the rim with my bare hands. I guess what I did was pinch the tube with the lever or the tire bead.
A foot of bead? That's a lot. As above, try to pinch both beads towards the center well of the rim. This will give you slack so you can push the rest of the bead over the rim. Keep trying- and it might be a good idea to start over with a brand new inner tube. At least then you'll be pretty sure there's no holes.
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Old 11-12-11, 11:29 AM
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Follow the advice about letting the "shape holding" air out of the tube for the last bit. ALso don't be shy about repeatedly and frequently sweeping the portion of the bead into the center of the clearance dip in the middle of the rim. The more of the bead you get sitting low in that groove the easier the unmounted part of the bead will be to push over the lip. With a half dozen such sweeps and a little hand tension you should be able to reduce the amount of the bead that needs levers down to 6 to 8 inches quite easily. Or with a bit more force and repeated sweeping of the seated bead you might well find that you can flip the rest over by hand pressure. Just make sure that the tube is already down in the rim so it can't be pinched.

The amount of air that I put in for seating the tube is just barely enough to make it not flat and ribbon like. If you have too much it makes it harder to tuck the tube over and into the rim channel. And that could well lead to it puffing up and getting pinched by the tire and levers. And even that little I do use I release for the last portion of the seating if the tire is giving me any trouble at all. With this method and the frequent bead sweeps I can typically seat 3 out of 4 tires with no lever needed. And the rest typically just need the lever for the last few inches. And even then I'll hold one bead crossing with a knee while I hold light pressure on the lever and sweep the bead to center yet again. If you do that you can easily feel the resistance in the lever ease off a lot.
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Old 11-12-11, 12:17 PM
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I've used the "Quik Stik" tire lever for years and have never had an issue.
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Old 11-12-11, 08:41 PM
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Originally Posted by kaseri View Post
I've used the "Quik Stik" tire lever for years and have never had an issue.
I can use a quick stick + 1 lever for removal--haven't figured out how to do it alone. Never tried it for installation. The single lever method is what I use.
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Old 11-13-11, 03:29 AM
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This is one of the tougher tires that I've had to install and remove. Is this something unique to Michelin tire? Continental, WTB, IRC, Tioga, and Panaracer whether wire or kevlar bead, I've never had as much trouble removing or installing or putting the tire back on.
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