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shimano alivio sora deore and other

Old 01-04-12, 11:14 AM
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siddartha
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shimano alivio sora deore and other

Hello guys,

I would not call this a problem. It's more rather like a dilemma. I got my first bike in 21 years. The previous was a gift. This was also already made. So I'm trying real hard to figgure the components out. At this point I see there are a lot of choices when it comes to derailleur. In the shop from where I took my bike they have side by side shimano alivio, sora and deore. The price is slightly different and nothing more. Like the mafia guys would say in the movies: I mean no disrespect, but I don't trust so much the sales people when it's their field of business. And my neighbours seem to prefer the supermarket type of bike: the one that does get a discount at certain times of the year. For me it's Ancient Chinese when I don't know any modern Chinese either. Google leads me to advertisments sites disguised as reviewers. And youtube is pretty much „lookie, what I can do in 2 minutes of stop motion”.

Could you help me? I hope it's the right section of the forum to ask for this kind of issues.
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Old 01-04-12, 11:22 AM
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Here's a rough hierarchy of Shimano models (from best to worst):

MTB: XTR, XT, SLX/LX, Deore, Alivio, Acera, Tourney
Road: Dura-Ace, Ultegra, 105, Tiagra, Sora, 2000-series

Deore and 105 are about the middle-ground between higher-end and lower-end.

There many variations and compatibility issues between and within the MTB and road lines.

Tell us what component you want to install and other parts that connect to it and we can help you determine compatibility.
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Old 01-04-12, 11:25 AM
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Shimano has a progession of components lines from low to high in both road and mountain bike types. As you go up the food chain in price, the components get lighter, more precise and usually more durable and, for the first few steps at least, the performance and shifting accuracy improves. The three groups you mention are near the bottom of their respective lines. Sora is a road group and Alevio and Deore (in order, lower to higher) are mountain bike groups. If you go to Shimano's web site and look under the "Products" tab their component lines are listed in order from high to low.
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Old 01-04-12, 11:26 AM
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What shifters do you have? to elimnate all potential compatibilty issues, stick with either road or MTB groupsets

If you currently have road, go for Sora

If MTB, go for Alivio or Deore

What ever you go for, you will also need to match the speed of the RD to your shifters / chain, for Sora, this will be 8 speed, for Alivio, this will be 8 speed, for Deore, this will be 9 or 10 speed.

Why don't you trust your LBS, ok their are trying to sell you stuff, that's their job, but they should be able to give good advice.

You mention supermarket bikes, would avoid these, as they are normally BSO's and are really disposable bikes, to fix one up to a good working standard can cost more than a low end from a LBS which is properly setup.
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Old 01-04-12, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by JiveTurkey View Post
Here's a rough hierarchy of Shimano models (from best to worst):
Tell us what component you want to install and other parts that connect to it and we can help you determine compatibility.
Wow! I wasn't aware the list can be so long. So: why is there a difference between MTB and Road, in terms of derailleur? From what I know road means a lighter bike going for the speed. And MTB means a rugged bike going for the stamina. So I gathered it's about frame and wheel weight vs strenght.

I can't even clasify my bike. According to the French table there is a class for all terrain, which I translate as the English MTB. There is also a road class which maybe it's the same. But they also have a class for all types of road, which is not for all terrain. Mine is classified as something even more unclear, as a polyvalent which is between this all types of road and city or road. I find it a bit heavy at almost 16 kilos, plus the locks it reaches about 18kilos.

I am not trying to change anything at all. But I am trying real hard to understand what's this all about.

Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Shimano has a progession of components lines from low to high in both road and mountain bike types. As you go up the food chain in price, the components get lighter, more precise and usually more durable and, for the first few steps at least, the performance and shifting accuracy improves. The three groups you mention are near the bottom of their respective lines. Sora is a road group and Alevio and Deore (in order, lower to higher) are mountain bike groups. If you go to Shimano's web site and look under the "Products" tab their component lines are listed in order from high to low.
Makes a lot of sense what you are writing. What's there to look for in such a tool?

Originally Posted by jimc101 View Post
What shifters do you have? to elimnate all potential compatibilty issues, stick with either road or MTB groupsets

Why don't you trust your LBS, ok their are trying to sell you stuff, that's their job, but they should be able to give good advice.

You mention supermarket bikes, would avoid these, as they are normally BSO's and are really disposable bikes, to fix one up to a good working standard can cost more than a low end from a LBS which is properly setup.
I already have a SRAM 3.0 which I still have to learn how to use it smooth. In my case I also have the problem of the language, so I'm biased towards asking here.
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Old 01-04-12, 04:01 PM
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Originally Posted by siddartha View Post
Wow! I wasn't aware the list can be so long. So: why is there a difference between MTB and Road, in terms of derailleur?..... Makes a lot of sense what you are writing. What's there to look for in such a tool?
Road bikes typically have a 23 or 25 tooth largest cog with 28 or 30T being largest available. MTB's usually have 32 or 34T largest cogs and even larger are available so the rear derailleurs for each type are designed to handle the expected maximum cog size and different tooth ranges.

Road bikes also commonly have 50, 52 or 53T largest chainrings while MTB cranks usually have 44 or 42T largest so their front derailleurs are designed to match the curvature of these rings.

As an aside, touring bikes, which are road bikes, need very low gears so they are often fitted with MTB drivetrains.

Shimano's web site lists all of their component groups in descending order of price and "quality" Look here: https://bike.shimano.com/ and then under the "Product" tab.
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Old 01-04-12, 04:13 PM
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I'd say not 'best to worst', but compromises to meet a price point,
so the customer can afford the bike.
they work..
The simple job > shove the chain sideways, to the nearby next sprocket.

higher price point gets more expensive materials and manufacturing processes.

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Old 01-04-12, 04:37 PM
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Originally Posted by siddartha View Post
I already have a SRAM 3.0 which I still have to learn how to use it smooth.
Sorry but need to confuse the issue more. SRAM uses a 1:1 pull ratio on a lot of their stuff (I believe yours is this type) while Shimano uses 2:1. They won't work with each other. If you change the rear derailluer to Shimano, you'll need to change the shifter to Shimano.
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Old 01-04-12, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
I'd say not 'best to worst', but compromises to meet a price point, so the customer can afford the bike.
That's exactly why I put the word quality in quotes.
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Old 01-04-12, 05:06 PM
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Hi Siddartha, this B'Twin Original looks like a hybrid to me. Best thing for now is to get plenty of riding done, and work out what you like doing. Unless things break or wear out, why worry about replacements now? Your SRAM 3.0 shifter and 7 speed derailleur are part of SRAM's MTB range of components and work on a 1:1 actuation ratio which is different to Shimano anyway. When it comes time to replace, you could upgrade to a SRAM X4 rear derailleur with that shifter; otherwise you will have to replace both, as further up the range everything is 9 or 10 speed and you will then have to replace chain and rear cluster as well. Your choices for this bike will then be between SRAM and Shimano MTB components. Find out more about SRAM at https://www.sram.com/sram/mountain/products, links for Shimano already posted by HillRider.

The main thing is, enjoy the bike :O)
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Old 01-04-12, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
That's exactly why I put the word quality in quotes.
I think he was referring to my post.

How about I say "best to least best."
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Old 01-04-12, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by siddartha View Post
I am not trying to change anything at all. But I am trying real hard to understand what's this all about.
Have time to do some reading? Check out https://sheldonbrown.com/ The whole website is great. A couple articles to get you started:

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html
https://sheldonbrown.com/speeds.html
https://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html
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Old 01-04-12, 06:53 PM
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Sure looks like a "city-bike". Has light MTB components and a suspension fork to deal with potholes and curbs, and gives the rider a very upright position to look around in traffic. Like a lot of city models, there is some emphasis on a "chic" look. A friend of mine has a Felt Cafe similar to this.

For the record, if your link was correct, you have SRAM components that would require you to replace your entire group set to go to anything Shimano (as mentioned earlier).

My questions are:

What is your mission for this bike?

If you have the pre-assembled bike in your link, why switch out the components for new ones at all? They're not flashy, but they'd be good for several thousand miles with proper care. In that time you'd discover what you find important in this era of components.



If you buy a supermarket bike, you will be back at this exact same point 6 months and $400 later.
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Old 01-05-12, 03:29 AM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
I'd say not 'best to worst', but compromises to meet a price point,
so the customer can afford the bike.
they work..
The simple job > shove the chain sideways, to the nearby next sprocket.

higher price point gets more expensive materials and manufacturing processes.
Hehehe. The man came up with rephrase: best to least best. I find that very funny.

Another silly question: does it have to do anything more than moving the chain from one sprocket to another? Yesterday while changing frontal gears the chain jumped off the largest wheel and it was a pain to detach the plastic shield (don't know what else to call it) and extract the chain from the two. Was it a design problem or just me changing speeds without a minimum of understanding of how things work? It was late night and the parking lot lighting was pretty far up, otherwise it would have been a lot easier to solve the slight mecanical problem.

And the silliest, most cliche question I can come up to this point: in other types of manufacture more expensive does not mean a constant increase in quality. Some times you pay double to get tenfold, sometimes it's the other way around and you pay ten times for twice the satisfaction. Who knows? Maybe even a 50% increase in confort really is worth a fifty times price increase. So what is there to examine in order to „see” the quality. Here, I would settle for a „at your level you can't” type of answer.

Originally Posted by CACycling View Post
Sorry but need to confuse the issue more. SRAM uses a 1:1 pull ratio on a lot of their stuff (I believe yours is this type) while Shimano uses 2:1. They won't work with each other. If you change the rear derailluer to Shimano, you'll need to change the shifter to Shimano.
I'm pretty much sure that the manufacturers are strongly against standardisation and would like to pretty much lock clients with their systems. Sure, it's a 10$ increase to change a piece and everybody is happy. But moving to another manufacturer should mean change as much as possible to the point that one might consider changing the whole bike. And, from a selling point of view, that's a wonderful idea, as the new bike might not perform precisely like the old one plus a performance increase, which means having second thoughts about leaving the first brand.

In my case, I don't want to change anything. I barely understand how things work, and I am trying to make some sense. Sure, I can be a sitcom genius and draw a nice diagram with pictures how you push on the pedal and the chain transfers the cinetic energy from the foot to the rear wheel. But things got a little bit more complicated in the last century. I've seen on youtube chainless bikes. And, because seeing is believing, now I can say it's possible. How? Magic!

Originally Posted by fr333zin View Post
Hi Siddartha, this B'Twin Original looks like a hybrid to me. Best thing for now is to get plenty of riding done, and work out what you like doing. Unless things break or wear out, why worry about replacements now? Your SRAM 3.0 shifter and 7 speed derailleur are part of SRAM's MTB range of components and work on a 1:1 actuation ratio which is different to Shimano anyway. When it comes time to replace, you could upgrade to a SRAM X4 rear derailleur with that shifter; otherwise you will have to replace both, as further up the range everything is 9 or 10 speed and you will then have to replace chain and rear cluster as well. Your choices for this bike will then be between SRAM and Shimano MTB components. Find out more about SRAM at https://www.sram.com/sram/mountain/products, links for Shimano already posted by HillRider.

The main thing is, enjoy the bike :O)
Oh! I enjoy it. And, although I feel tired after a ride, the day after I feel better. So it's highly probable I'm not going to drop this from my list of activities. And yes, polyvalent could mean hybrid. Not a speedster, not a mountain bike, something that can get you into town, but also can handle dirt road. That was the purpose, that was what the salesman offered. I really like how smooth it can pass a tiny barier.

I never wrote anything about replacement. Or at least, that was against my intention. But I find it rather frustrating to just ride it without minimal knowledge about what goes on. Sure, I won't make my own metalworks in the parking lot and brew my own sprockets. And although people claim that all you need is iron tubes to make the frame I will most probably not make any frames either. Maybe upgrading would be a healthy goal. But I'm at the point when I get this burning sensation I have to turn it to pieces and, at the same time, I'm very afraid that once I put it back together there are going to be a lot of metal pieces left on the outside.

What does the actuation ratio mean?


Things are pretty clear on my side, but I have issues of getting that through. It's not like I have a broken chain and 3 gears front with 7 in the back so what do I do? I'm a very urban creature and lived almost all my life car free. When I was a child my parents had a car, but they have decided it's not worth it so they moved on. Myself, I don't even hold a drivers licence. Given that I used to live in a metropolis transportation was never an issue. Even going to an exotic destination meant surely somebody who does have a car goes that way. Carpooling before the expansion of the internet and the forums. Now I live in a small town, but quite well conected as it's also next to a large city. But I am going to move soon to a quieter place which is a few kilometers away from regular transportation with a bus going back and forth three or four times a day. Going from having a bus in front of the building stop every half hour, that is quite a downgrade on this aspect. For the moment I don't see myself moving to a car, but I do feel a need to have some personal transportation at hand. I've calculated there are more than two decades since I have last rode a bike. So I bite the bullet and brought home that BTwin Original 5 and train in a nearby parking lot. The whole plan took a wonderful turn as my wife has discovered that distances do compress well on a time scale with the help of a bike. And she's a much better rider than me. So, soon I might get one for her as well. And my daughter, who is two, was so much into touching the bike that I have upgraded her from a baby trike to a 12" with training wheels. So, at this point, I am looking to make the move. After that I will have to find a small garage for all this hardware. And chances are I am going to be the sole bike technician in the family for the following decade when I hope to be replaced by my daughter.

Originally Posted by FastJake View Post
Have time to do some reading? Check out https://sheldonbrown.com/ The whole website is great. A couple articles to get you started:

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html
https://sheldonbrown.com/speeds.html
https://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html
Yes. I enjoy reading. I also have one of those reader gadgets, like Kindle, but something else. So thank you for your links. I am going to devour them soon. I just found out about Sheldon Brown about 24 hours before from a youtube clip. I also found out that he's not among up anymore. Sad. People seem to be excited about his site.

Originally Posted by Aurorabucky View Post
Sure looks like a "city-bike". Has light MTB components and a suspension fork to deal with potholes and curbs, and gives the rider a very upright position to look around in traffic. Like a lot of city models, there is some emphasis on a "chic" look. A friend of mine has a Felt Cafe similar to this.

For the record, if your link was correct, you have SRAM components that would require you to replace your entire group set to go to anything Shimano (as mentioned earlier).

My questions are:

What is your mission for this bike?

If you have the pre-assembled bike in your link, why switch out the components for new ones at all? They're not flashy, but they'd be good for several thousand miles with proper care. In that time you'd discover what you find important in this era of components.



If you buy a supermarket bike, you will be back at this exact same point 6 months and $400 later.
Yes, apart from being in French on an English speaking forum, there is nothing wrong with the link. The maker has another two lines for city bikes. One is for heavy, yet different frame than the usual diamond shape, in order to make the climbing easier. It's more like a scooter when it comes to looks. And they also have a couple of models as city and electrical. The city bikes are roughly 5 kilos heavier than mine and the electricals are about 10 kilos heavier. Also, they don't handle rough paths well and mine does. I plan to do some commuting from home to the nearest form of mass transit like the train or the regular city bus or tram so it would be mostly roads. But there might be a need for dirt roads. I already have a path like that where, right now, I go by foot: reaching my daugher's painting school means going on an S shaped road and also climb a steep bridge over the railway. Or I can cut down on the last half and just go on a path large enough to barely fit two bikes going in opposite directions. It's not as fast as taking the bus, but who needs a bus when there are berries on the path next to the rails? I assumed there are going to be more shortcuts like that where I'll move.

As for the prices, the ones I've seen quoted here make the States quite expensive. My bike has been 249€. One online money converter tells me that means today 322.41$. Supermarket type seems to be much cheaper. Anyway, with my current knowledge the bike would not have been in working condition. I can't even count all the prieces on the surface. I would have liked it a few kilos lighter, but that design is a perfect fit to what I do need right now. Does weight add to the stability? Compared with my body the bike weight seems irelevant.

Which leads to the next important question: what do you mean by proper care?

Ooops. I might have broken the database while trying to edit this message.

Last edited by siddartha; 01-05-12 at 04:24 AM. Reason: Highlighted the questions, given that's a looong message
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Old 01-05-12, 05:05 AM
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Originally Posted by jimc101 View Post

What ever you go for, you will also need to match the speed of the RD to your shifters / chain, for Sora, this will be 8 speed, for Alivio, this will be 8 speed, for Deore, this will be 9 or 10 speed.
Sora can be 9 speed. I've got a Sora RD running 9 speeds hooked up to Deore shifters.
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Old 01-05-12, 06:23 AM
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Hi Siddartha, you might try looking at something like this https://www.amazon.fr/gp/aw/d/2012369...8&sr=8-2-spell which should give you a good understanding of the basics written in the French language.
Answering your questions the rear dérailleur also maintains chain tension as well as shifting gears. But probably the reason for your chain coming off is the front derailleur is adjusted incorrectly. Can you re-create the same conditions in daylight? Sorry for mentioning actuation ratio this just means how much cable is pulled when the shifter is moved. 'Better' components could be lighter, stronger, more aesthetic, more reliable, smoother operating. Actually these things come in combination and there is a jewel-like quality to some higher end stuff. I have a passion for them.
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Old 01-05-12, 07:54 AM
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Originally Posted by fr333zin View Post
Hi Siddartha, you might try looking at something like this https://www.amazon.fr/gp/aw/d/2012369...8&sr=8-2-spell which should give you a good understanding of the basics written in the French language.
That's an excellent advice! I am going to follow it some time soon. Right now I am trying to minimise the volume of things I am going to move from one place to another. The thing is both English and French are second languages, but I feel far more at ease in English and also, some of the book I have on the subject are in English as well as most of the online texts. The sensible thing to do would be to adopt the French terms as I'm going to live here for a while and the country side is so much bike friendly than the UK. But although I have no problem using spoken French, or reading it, well, writing is a totally different thing. So I ended up favouring the English language.

As for the change of gears, it's the first geared bike I ever rode. So when I change the rear gears (7 in all) I hear a clank, clank. It's probably my lack of skill. Also, sometimes I have to rotate the gear shifter further away to get the result. On the front it's more problematic because not each time I change (3 gears in all) there is a result. Here, I can visually check, as there is no noise when the chain moves up or down the sprocket. It happens that I'm moving to the largest sprocket and the changer shows the 3, yet I can see the chain on the middle sprocket. Last night it is possible that I have rotated the shifter even further away from 3 to make it change and than there was a metalic noise and I felt I could not push further. And the pedal would come back if I take my feet off. As I had some speed I let the bike still go and this is where I have made the major mistake: I kept pushing my feet on the pedals to „make it better”. When I have stopped and went under a street light I have discovered the chain was stuck between the plastic shield next to my pedal and the largest sprocket. The look was impressive. The solution was simple: just unscrew the plastic disc from the large sprocket (four small phillips screws) and the chain was free. Pushed the rear derailleur towards the front wheel, fix the chain on the large sprocket and screw back the plastic disc. You guys probably can do this in your sleep. For me it was the first time to fix a bike.

I have noticed that, as I go on flat land with asphalt, using the 2nd front gear and the 4th rear gear just like with a fixed gear it's a good experience. I know I should have spent time using the brakes, than learn the gears, but the gears are far more spectacular.
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Old 01-05-12, 08:15 AM
  #18  
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From all of your written volume, I have to conclude your mechanical knowledge in general is lacking and your knowledge of bicycles in particular is. I recommend you read the Sheldon Brown web site and perhaps a couple of introductory book on bike mechanics. Perhaps that will clear up a lot of your questions.

As for the progression of product lines for bike components, lots of other products from stoves and refrigerators to automobiles do the same thing. Does it baffle you that a Honda Civic costs 10% as much as a Mercedes S-class? Do you get 10 times as much in the Mercedes?
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Old 01-05-12, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
As for the progression of product lines for bike components, lots of other products from stoves and refrigerators to automobiles do the same thing. Does it baffle you that a Honda Civic costs 10% as much as a Mercedes S-class? Do you get 10 times as much in the Mercedes?
That's why someone needs an intimate knowledge or bring one who has such a precious commodity. The stove usually getts installed by a trained technician. The fridge or washing machine (in my experience) outlive their warranty. With a bike, motorbike or car things are more complicated. Because they are portable and when they break usually the driver is the only one to help. So one should know what's inside and what can be fixed without the need of a shop and power tools. As for the reading, I aleardy started.

For you I have one extra question: what's the relevance of the sprocket teeth in all that math? Besides comparing gears.
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Old 01-05-12, 09:33 AM
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Originally Posted by siddartha View Post
For you I have one extra question: what's the relevance of the sprocket teeth in all that math? Besides comparing gears.
That's exactly what the numbers are for. The ratio of the number of teeth on a given cog with the number of teeth on a given chainring defines each gear ratio. That ratio coupled with the diameter of the wheel tells you how far the bike will travel with each rotation of the crank and how hard or easy it will be to turn the crank.
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Old 01-05-12, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by CACycling View Post
Sorry but need to confuse the issue more. SRAM uses a 1:1 pull ratio on a lot of their stuff (I believe yours is this type) while Shimano uses 2:1. They won't work with each other. If you change the rear derailluer to Shimano, you'll need to change the shifter to Shimano.
My Trek 7200 has SRAM grip shifters that work with my 8 speed Alivio.
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Old 01-05-12, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by richard4993 View Post
My Trek 7200 has SRAM grip shifters that work with my 8 speed Alivio.
I didn't say all, I said "a lot" and, according to the SRAM site, that includes the OP's bike.
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Old 01-05-12, 01:18 PM
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If you're having issues with shifting your front or rear derailleurs, it could be the normal cable stretch that you get with a new bike as you first ride it. Freshly installed cables are one length, but will stretch over the first 200 miles or so. This happens on virtually ANY NEW BIKE be it $100 or $6000 and many bike shops advise that you bring your bike back in to have everything readjusted after this break-in period.

As far as hearing a sound when you shift, it's either an adjustment issue, or you may be expecting too much finesse out of your drivetrain. The main "skill" involved with shifting is to ease off your power a bit before the shift if you're on a hill or pushing hard - and most times the shift still occurs if you don't, it's simply louder and puts extra stress on your parts).

As far as your chainrings dropping your chain, I have a quality carbon road bike with Shimano 105, and it drops the chain from time to time as well. It's probably a front derailleur adjustment issue. Those things deal less with your parts, and more with how your parts are calibrated. If you're uncomfortable performing that adjustment yourself, I'd recommend taking it to a qualified bike mechanic.

Why do many of us spend such varying costs for bike parts? I'll tell you a story. I was given a cheap MTB that was equipped with Shimano Altus/Acera. I used it for about 3500 miles. Then, I completely overhauled the drivetrain with Deore/SLX. My Deore drivetrain shifts more securely than my Altus one on steep hills. I can remove all my Deore chainrings as opposed to my one-piece Altus crank and clean it far easier. Both can be maintained, but Deore is maintained easier. Both shift fine in easy riding, but Deore does it better in tough situations. Altus works fine for begginers and casual riders. Deore works better for moderately aggressive riding and long miles. Deore costs over 3X what Altus costs, and for me there IS a difference and it IS worth it.

Had I upgraded to Deore right off the bat 3500 miles ago, I doubt I'd have noticed the difference.

Now if I was RACING, XT or XTR would give me even stiffer shifting and weigh enough less, that it might buy me a couple seconds and let me win my next race. At that point, racing would either be my career or my biggest passion in life and spending 3X what my Deore cost would seem pretty worth it.

If I changed right now from Deore to XTR, I probably would not appreciate the difference enough for it to be worthwhile given the money. A racer would completely appreciate the difference and opt to pay the cash.

And so the market exists for parts with large gradients in price that look similar but appear different in subtle ways.

With all due respect, congratulations on purchasing a capable entry-level urban hybrid bike. If you maintain it well, or your bike shop does, everything should last you quite a while. Unless your setup doesn't work for what you need, OR you've completely worn out parts already (which I highly doubt), I'd advise just RIDING the machine and worrying about group, brand, or gear ratio specifics when you actually need to.


Cheers and best of fun in your cycling future!

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Old 01-05-12, 03:18 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
That's exactly what the numbers are for. The ratio of the number of teeth on a given cog with the number of teeth on a given chainring defines each gear ratio. That ratio coupled with the diameter of the wheel tells you how far the bike will travel with each rotation of the crank and how hard or easy it will be to turn the crank.
Oh, but for that I got myself a bike computer. Just joking. I jotted down that piece of information and I plan to go back to it once I figgure out what's the fuss with the ratios with the help of Sheldon, of course.

Originally Posted by Aurorabucky View Post
As far as hearing a sound when you shift, it's either an adjustment issue, or you may be expecting too much finesse out of your drivetrain. The main "skill" involved with shifting is to ease off your power a bit before the shift if you're on a hill or pushing hard - and most times the shift still occurs if you don't, it's simply louder and puts extra stress on your parts).

With all due respect, congratulations on purchasing a capable entry-level urban hybrid bike. If you maintain it well, or your bike shop does, everything should last you quite a while. Unless your setup doesn't work for what you need, OR you've completely worn out parts already (which I highly doubt), I'd advise just RIDING the machine and worrying about group, brand, or gear ratio specifics when you actually need to.


Cheers and best of fun in your cycling future!
First of all thanks for the expanded message. The cut parts are reassuring that things are going well. As for the rest, I'm waiting to gather more info and maybe find some more things I have to tune before heading out to the service. Call me cheap, but the seller offers a free service / checkup in the first six months after purchase. So that's when I'll ask for some tuning.

With the gears: that's what I do. Or at least I think I do. Push, change gear, push. At the second push I hear the noise. It's my first bike with gears ever and everybody has warned me about how beginners make the chain sing. As weird as it might sound, I'm not for the perfect machine. I'm happy with the gears like that, and for the time being I enjoy the freewheel more than the change of gears. Next steps would be to master the breaks and reach that equilibrium that lets me signal the change of path or turn around and check the trafic. You can laugh, but I'm happy to have reduced the surface needed for a complete turn without going off the bike.

Also, thank you for your good wishes. I have no idea how you know it's a capable entry–level. I can't while I'm riding it. So probably that is a good sign. I don't know much about maintaining it. The shop sent me a mail with some links to a few short clips on this theme. So far I have inscribed my email address on the frame with a permanent marker for ceramics. I figgured out that it can go well and stick on the paint. It doesn't. I have removed the dry dirt with a piece of soft cloth. Oh, and put an extra layer of spray chain lube from a bike shop only in the gears area. I have the degreaser as well, and once I notice heavy dirt I'm going to put that to use too.
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Old 01-05-12, 03:25 PM
  #25  
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So the conclusion of this thread for now is that I do have to read a lot over at Sheldon's site, God bless him! Maybe it was annoying for you to read all about a newcommer again. But for me it was very useful as I have to study this theeth–sprockets ratios. Sure, the derailleur looks so less relevant now, but it would have taken me a lot of time before finding the importance of the ratios. Also, my feeling at the moment are that the poor man's solution, the cheapest system is the best as long as it does the job. Also, searching for the Holy Grail of the feather–weighted bike might be relevant for top athletes. In my case shedding some kilos off my body is both cheaper and healthier, while also reducing the carbon footprint.

And thank you all for being so helpful and so swift in replies.
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