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Rear Dérailleur shifting problem

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Rear Dérailleur shifting problem

Old 01-26-12, 02:54 PM
  #1  
skieslord
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Rear Dérailleur shifting problem

I have a bike with a Shimano Alivio RD-M410 rear derailleur. My problem is that I am having problems to adjust it. When shift up (from smallest ring to biggest) it will go two rings up insted of one, and when adjust the tension it does it well going one by one as it should but on the way back it normally stays on the biggest ring, when I shift down from 8 to 7 it stays. I have to shift down again to make it go to next gear down, and almost to the 3rd or second ring it goes down two rings again.

Any advise to correct this problem, let me know if I did not explain my self well.
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Old 01-26-12, 03:42 PM
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Sounds like a sticky cable problem. I can see a tie-wrap holding the casing to the chainstay, and this will put an extra bend in the cable. Every bend adds friction, and with an older cable that hasn't been lubricated in a while, it can get sticky.

Take the cable completely out of the casing and the shifter, inspect it for fraying, wipe it down with light lube, preferably with teflon, (spray some teflon lube down the housing, too) and re-insert it. Remove that cable tie. Better yet, replace the cable and housing, adjust everything, and the shifting problems will disappear.
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Old 01-26-12, 04:10 PM
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dsbrantjr
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skieslord: Beside the cable tie stressing the cable, the cable loop going into the derailleur seems to be kind of short. cycle_maven's advice above is good, but cables are cheap and I'd suggest that if you are going to go to all of that trouble you go all the way and just replace the cable and housing with a good-quality stainless die-drawn cable and lined housing. Take care to properly prepare the housing ends, install the new cable then follow these instructions http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-...nts-derailleur from the beginning, not skipping any steps and your shifting should be top-notch again.
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Old 01-26-12, 04:11 PM
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Originally Posted by cycle_maven View Post
Sounds like a sticky cable problem. I can see a tie-wrap holding the casing to the chainstay, and this will put an extra bend in the cable. Every bend adds friction, and with an older cable that hasn't been lubricated in a while, it can get sticky.

Take the cable completely out of the casing and the shifter, inspect it for fraying, wipe it down with light lube, preferably with teflon, (spray some teflon lube down the housing, too) and re-insert it. Remove that cable tie. Better yet, replace the cable and housing, adjust everything, and the shifting problems will disappear.
I installed the cable tied last night when trying to adjust it. The shifters are new, I installed last night as well and so the cable, I found that holding the cable that way it makes a better loop so the cable travel better inside the housing, however the problem persist. I took the picture this morning before come to work, so the strap will not remain on. I think I am taking your advise to replace the housing
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Old 01-26-12, 05:24 PM
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I see what you are saying. I will chage the housing and follow that video. I will let you know as soonest I complete this tasks.
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Old 01-27-12, 10:35 AM
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Oh, new shifters *and* cable and housing? There shouldn't be any problems with the cable sliding in new housing, so my earlier stick cable presumption is probably wrong.

Three possibilities:
1) The new shifters are for a different number of speeds or a different manufacturer from the original shifters. The amount of cable pulled per click could be different, and that would cause multitudes of shifting problems.
2) The new cable housing is not the "incompressible" type. If it's spiral-wound (brake-type housing) rather than made of parallel wires held in a plastic sheath (gear-type housing), then the housing will compress with each click by a different amount, and the shifting will be poor.
3) Where the new housing is cut could be slightly off-axis, allowing the cable to jam between the housing and ferrule. I had this happen on a bike, and the shifting was horrible. I trimmed the housing and it improved mightily.

Just looking at the picture, I'd say 2) is the problem. That looks like brake housing to me...
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Old 01-27-12, 11:26 AM
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Another possibility is a bent derailleur hanger.

Stand your bike up perfectly vertically and shift into a gear combination that makes your derailleur arm point straight down. Then look at the derailleur from the back. If the derailleur arm looks like it's pointing toward the rear tire even a little, that's your problem.
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Old 01-27-12, 01:21 PM
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I havent install new housing, I think your assumption may be correct. I will have those replace today.
What i did replaced was:
New 8-speed cassete. front deraulliuer, and rear (all new all alivio) changed the body freewheel.

And I think is a brake housing, you are right is an espiral type, I never noticed that before.

Originally Posted by cycle_maven View Post
Oh, new shifters *and* cable and housing? There shouldn't be any problems with the cable sliding in new housing, so my earlier stick cable presumption is probably wrong.

Three possibilities:
1) The new shifters are for a different number of speeds or a different manufacturer from the original shifters. The amount of cable pulled per click could be different, and that would cause multitudes of shifting problems.
2) The new cable housing is not the "incompressible" type. If it's spiral-wound (brake-type housing) rather than made of parallel wires held in a plastic sheath (gear-type housing), then the housing will compress with each click by a different amount, and the shifting will be poor.
3) Where the new housing is cut could be slightly off-axis, allowing the cable to jam between the housing and ferrule. I had this happen on a bike, and the shifting was horrible. I trimmed the housing and it improved mightily.

Just looking at the picture, I'd say 2) is the problem. That looks like brake housing to me...
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Old 01-27-12, 01:24 PM
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I will have a look on that, I havent pay attention to that.

Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
Another possibility is a bent derailleur hanger.

Stand your bike up perfectly vertically and shift into a gear combination that makes your derailleur arm point straight down. Then look at the derailleur from the back. If the derailleur arm looks like it's pointing toward the rear tire even a little, that's your problem.
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Old 01-28-12, 10:45 AM
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well, the problem was actually the housing, they were real bad. Also I have to replace the chain. Since I move from 7 speed to 8 I had to change chain.

Thanks to all of you, all were real helpfull.
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Old 01-28-12, 03:38 PM
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You shouldn't need to replace the chain, although it might not be a bad idea with a new cassette.
IF you were going to 9 or 10 speed, THEN you would HAVE TO.
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Old 01-30-12, 10:50 AM
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hmm.. this guy stated that 8-speed chain would be slightly thinner so the chain does not try to jump up the next gear. so this is not true at all?
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Old 01-30-12, 11:39 AM
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Modern 8 speed chains work for 6, 7 and 8 speeds. It probably would be a good idea to replace the chain, too, since everything else is new. Chains are the first thing to wear out, and if you replace them often, the rest of the drivetrain will last longer.

Good job finding the problem and fixing it!
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Old 02-07-12, 10:28 AM
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thanks everyone!
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