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Two Locknuts on the freewheel side?

Old 03-11-12, 11:31 PM
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Pepper Grinder
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Two Locknuts on the freewheel side?

I'm repacking a rear hub Shimano HB-6207. The drive side has the cone, then a thin keyed washer, then a thin, smooth sided threaded locknut (in a square shape), then a number of unkeyed spacers, then a proper serrated locknut.

What's with the smooth threaded locknut? It's making it difficult to test my bearing adjustment and make quick adjustments.

I found this thread where somebody was asking the same question: http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-no-difference and the answer seemed to do with drum braking for a tandem, but my HB-6207 is certainly not on a tandem. Was this hub supposed to be 'drum-brake capable'?
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Old 03-11-12, 11:34 PM
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if it was me, i would just mark it down as somebody's improvised spacer.

maybe use the NDS locknut/cone for quick adjustments? or get a few suitable washers to replace the square locknut on the DS?

edit: looks to me like hb-6207 was just a regular ol' shimano hub.

Last edited by hueyhoolihan; 03-11-12 at 11:38 PM.
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Old 03-12-12, 12:23 AM
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Yeah, the standard approach is to leave the driveside locked as-is, as the "reference" side, and perform adjustments on the non-driveside end of the axle. Clamp the axle in an axle vise so you have both hands free to work with the NDS cone and locknut. This also eliminates the need to remove the freewheel.
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Old 03-12-12, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Pepper Grinder View Post
I'm repacking a rear hub Shimano HB-6207. The drive side has the cone, then a thin keyed washer, then a thin, smooth sided threaded locknut (in a square shape), then a number of unkeyed spacers, then a proper serrated locknut.

What's with the smooth threaded locknut? It's making it difficult to test my bearing adjustment and make quick adjustments.

I found this thread where somebody was asking the same question: http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-no-difference and the answer seemed to do with drum braking for a tandem, but my HB-6207 is certainly not on a tandem. Was this hub supposed to be 'drum-brake capable'?
That's the normal arrangement. Take a look here: http://equusbicycle.com/bike/shimano...ocat750008.pdf (a slightly earlier version of your hub). As others said. you should lock down the right side of the hub, then do any bearing adjustment on the left side.
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Old 03-13-12, 03:30 PM
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I have seen plenty of hubs with double driveside locknuts. As mentioned, tighten all the DS spacers and nuts together like crazy, and never worry about them again. Adjust bearings with the non-drive-side from hereafter.
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Old 03-14-12, 05:32 AM
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Oh, the reason I asked is because I like to use the bearing adjustment method I learned from S. Brown: To tighten, grab both locknuts and tighten towards each other. To loosen, grab both cones and loosen away from each other. Doesn't seem to work with double locknuts and keyed washers.

Thanks though, I just tightened everything down and it only needed a bit of adjustment before it was where I wanted it.
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Old 03-14-12, 06:22 AM
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This is a fairly common arrangement. As others have said, make the adjustments from the left. If you wish to use the SB method for the final tweak (no more than that or you could shear the tabs of the keyed washers) use the cones outward the same way, or the outermost locknuts inward.

The arrangement seems illogical unless you think about the freewheels these hubs were first made for. The old Shimano, like the Atom from France required that the axle spacers were removed to make space for the splined freewheel remover.

Having the cone and locknut independent of the added RH spacers meant thet the outer locknut and spacers could be easily removed without affecting the cone adjustment. To get the full benefit of the design it's important that the outer RH locknut isn't over-tightened, so that it comes off fairly while holding the axle from the left side. If you over tighten the outer locknut there's a decent chance the left cone will move instead when you try to remove it.
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Old 03-14-12, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
This is a fairly common arrangement...

...The arrangement seems illogical unless you think about the freewheels these hubs were first made for. The old Shimano, like the Atom from France required that the axle spacers were removed to make space for the splined freewheel remover...
ahhhh HA! so there IS a reasonable explanation for this.

good to know, because it was BUGGING me man.
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