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Stripped/cross-threaded hub shell temporary fix?

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Stripped/cross-threaded hub shell temporary fix?

Old 03-15-12, 03:06 PM
  #1  
Aquakitty
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Stripped/cross-threaded hub shell temporary fix?

I have a hub size/type that is hard to find. A replacement is coming eventually but I was thinking in the mean time maybe I could do a temp fix?

Here's the problem: The beginning threads inside the hub shell are missing and this caused the 10mm bolt that holds the freehub body on to cross thread and strip. It was like that when I bought it (22 year old bike).

When I first removed the freehub body for cleaning (the freehub is another story... the bearings inside are disintegrating) and re-installed the bolt I noticed it slightly cross thread. I unscrewed it and carefully screwed it back in, and it went (I just got lucky.).

I removed the freehub again because it needed more flushing and oiling. I went to put it back on but this time it would not go.

I examined the hub shell threads and saw the first threads are gone completely. There is no going back now, the bolt won't go on straight.

I was thinking, what if I file down the threads and use magic putty or JB weld to hold on the bolt temporarily (or some other substance?)

Bad idea? There is not much force on it once it is in and the hub is done for anyways.

Not my pic obviously but similar hub style, the arrow is pointing to the stripped threads inside hub.

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Old 03-15-12, 03:23 PM
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Look for an old wheel at the bike shop with rim damage .
and use the Hub, Rebuild wheel, re-spoke.

it will be a proper replacement, not a ...
it aint gonna last might break at the worst possible time .. JB weld Bodge.
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Old 03-15-12, 07:32 PM
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Temporary - If your new hub comes with the bolt try cutting some slots in the end of this bolt perpendicular to the threads. Dremel prefered, hacksaw will work. These will act as cutting edges and be sort of a tap to cut new threads.
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Old 03-15-12, 11:52 PM
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Out of curiosity, what's so unusual about the hub?
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Old 03-16-12, 05:14 AM
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Temporary - If your new hub comes with the bolt try cutting some slots in the end of this bolt perpendicular to the threads. Dremel prefered, hacksaw will work. These will act as cutting edges and be sort of a tap to cut new threads.
Hmm interesting, never thought of that one might give it a go.

As for the "buy an old hub" I have one and was going to do that (old freewheel hub) but seems like a pain in the rear to have to build the wheel twice.

Originally Posted by silver_ghost View Post
Out of curiosity, what's so unusual about the hub?
It's a 126mm OLD 7 speed cassette hub with 36 holes. I can't stretch out the frame at all as it is bonded carbon fiber. I can get a 130 andremove a spacer so it will fit but I still have to wait for the hub to come. I was waiting it out to try and find an original hub but it's not looking good.
There are a ton of freewheel hubs out there with 126/36h but I don't want to downgrade to a freewheel as this used to be a fairly nice wheel (Shimano 600 w/light weight aero clincher rim).
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Old 03-16-12, 11:08 AM
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when installing shimano freehubs on shells i often wondered how tight that fancy bolt really needed to be. after all, the star shaped boss that it engages on the shell hub is pretty wide and the tension of the bearings via the locknuts hold it together too.

most of the torque is borne by the boss and there is little sideways force on that bolt, so i would just strip the threads if necessary, put 'er together and see what happens, after all it's junk already. maybe it's really just junk that will work. (like a lot of MY stuff!).
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Old 03-16-12, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by hueyhoolihan View Post
when installing shimano freehubs on shells i often wondered how tight that fancy bolt really needed to be. after all, the star shaped boss that it engages on the shell hub is pretty wide and the tension of the bearings via the locknuts hold it together too.

most of the torque is borne by the boss and there is little sideways force on that bolt, so i would just strip the threads if necessary, put 'er together and see what happens, after all it's junk already. maybe it's really just junk that will work. (like a lot of MY stuff!).
I thought the freehub might be crooked if I did that, but maybe not since it has to sit on those splines. Just the bolt would be crooked. Right?
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Old 03-16-12, 11:35 AM
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It wounds me deeply that you would call a freewheel a downgrade.

I will probably forgive this with time, but for now, you are off my Xmas card list.

I suppose you are adamantly opposed to a 126mm 6cog freehub, too?
They are pretty commonly found hereabouts and work very well.

I, too, wonder how much of the torque actually finds its way to the bolt.

JB Weld is the spawn of Beelzebub.
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Old 03-16-12, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
It wounds me deeply that you would call a freewheel a downgrade.

I will probably forgive this with time, but for now, you are off my Xmas card list.

I suppose you are adamantly opposed to a 126mm 6cog freehub, too?
They are pretty commonly found hereabouts and work very well.

I, too, wonder how much of the torque actually finds its way to the bolt.

JB Weld is the spawn of Beelzebub.


No 6 cog scum shall touch my 7 speed index shifters! I do have a 7 speed 36h freewheel hub set but I am too lazy to want to build the wheel twice.

I think I will JB Weld it. What the hell.

I have a story to tell. One time, not long ago, I bought a bike frame with a wheel set. I was to use this bike and wheel set for touring, and to test it out I loaded 50 lbs of weight into the rear panniers.

As I was flying down a hill I hit the rear brake, but the rear wheel locked and I skidded like 50 ft with 50 lbs of weights hanging off the back. Fortunately I came out unscathed.

At the time all I could see was that somehow the wheel shifted and the disc brake disc had jammed against the calliper.

It turned out someone had not put that 10mm bolt back into the freehub. I had ridden the bike a good 100km before the touring load incident. So, that should give you some idea of what it takes to make it move sans bolt.
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Old 03-16-12, 10:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Aquakitty View Post
Hmm interesting, never thought of that one might give it a go.
Here's what I mean. Couldn't find it the other night.
https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-a-tap-from-a-bolt/

Last edited by dedhed; 03-16-12 at 10:43 PM.
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Old 03-17-12, 10:49 AM
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The freehub bolt is actually a VERY important part of the hub. The bearings sit out in the end of the freehub cup but the drive side spokes are in at the flange inside of the freehub. So the center bolt actually connects the side forces of the spokes holding the bike up to the bearing in the cup which connects these forces to the frame. If the threads don't hold the wheel hub area will flex and collapse. Carrying the forces requires tensile preload in that bolt. And that means it has to be able to withstand the torque needed to achieve adequite tensile load and not strip out when you're sitting on the bike and hanging from the spokes.

All in all if you've got a half dozen turns of the bolt which are good then I "think" you could get away with the epoxy trick. But the hub will certainly be toast for any further work at all. Thoroughly degrease and dry first of course. You need to totally weld it in and not disturb the hub for at least 24 hours. It will also need to be able to withstand half the required torque on the remaining threads to achieve the sort of connection needed to not flex and collapse in use.
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Old 03-20-12, 06:52 PM
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Just an update if anyone is interested/gets into the same situation.

I cleaned the hub body threads and 10mm steel bolt and then put some light oil on them. As you know the hub body is aluminium and the threads are quite soft.

I just used a big hex wrench and a lever to slowly turn the bolt into the hub. I would go a little ways forward then back out. I cleaned it out a few times and re-oiled it.

I had no problem attaching a new freehub body to the old hub (Uniglide > Hyperglide) and after this procedure it screwed in tight on it's own.

I would not trust this for hundreds of miles but it'll do until my new hub arrives.

BTW I tried making a tap out of the bolt with a triangular metal file I had laying around.... there was no way that was gonna happen at least by hand. The bolt material must be heat treated, it is hard as a fricking diamond. I could have done it with my dremel (crudely I am sure) but why bother since this worked fine.

Once the bolt was all the way on the freehub was perfectly straight.
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