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FYI: Harbor Freight Selling 20-200 inch/lbs Torque Wrench $10 w/coupon

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FYI: Harbor Freight Selling 20-200 inch/lbs Torque Wrench $10 w/coupon

Old 03-29-12, 12:24 AM
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durrrell
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FYI: Harbor Freight Selling 20-200 inch/lbs Torque Wrench $10 w/coupon

I just picked one up. I didn't have a coupon, so I lingered around the store until I found someone that wasn't gonna use theirs and they gave me the coupon... Otherwise it's still on sale for $17. Still a good price. This is for a clicker type, 1/4" drive.
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Old 03-29-12, 12:41 AM
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My dad has a machine that can measure and test a torque wrenches to see if they are accurate at his shop. He keeps telling me not to get the ones had Harbor Freight and that they are not very accurate.
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Old 03-29-12, 03:11 AM
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We have our own calibration tech in the tool room at work. My Harbor Freight torque wrench (3/8 drive) was less than 2% out in 5 different settings. That is more than close enough for anything you will put on a bicycle. You need to remember that just about all non-high end torque wrenches are made by the same few factories in China, be they Craftsman, Harbor Freight, store brands, etc. As a side note, my Snap-On 1/2 drive varies wildly in accuracy from one setting to the next and it was $300. I finally got sick of chasing the adjustment and stopped bringing it in to work to get checked.
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Old 03-29-12, 07:33 AM
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Harbor Freight tools are pure garbage. Only use for their stuff would be if you need a tool cheap for a one time job. I don't understand the individual who will spend $$$$$ on a bike and then skimp on the cheapest piece of crap tool to maintain it?
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Old 03-29-12, 08:33 AM
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I used to own about $10k of Snap-on tools and only bought the best tools when I was a motorcycle service manager and pro AMA/FIM Expert MotoGP roadracer. Unfortunately years after I retired from racing, all my tools were stolen. Yes, I owned a Snap-on torque wrench and they are excellent tools. But I'm now just a bicycle hobbyist, my life is not on the line when I ride my road bikes and I'm not hitting 200+mph on my bicycles. A cheap torque wrench is far better than no torque wrench. Also, if you do enough wrenching, after awhile, you get a feel for what is the correct amount of torque even without the benefit of a torque wrench. I'm not used to the low inch-pounds of force used on bicycles, so I needed to get a torque wrench to reacquaint me to the lower torque forces used on bicycles.

@ $10, that's a throwaway price. If you are a bike mechanic, sure go for the pro level tools. But for the majority of the bike hobbyists and home mechanics, I think this is good enough and $10-17... come on! that's a great deal! I buy/own vintage bikes and haven't spent over $200 for any of the 12-15 bikes I own, excepting a bike I bought new in the 80's which is now also considered a vintage bike... I guess I'm now an antique too... so to spend way more for a single tool that I would only very occasionally use, doesn't make sense to me. If you've got money to burn and own $3-10k bikes, sure you can afford to spend the bucks on top quality tools... of course do it... love Snap-on...

I used to be a tool snob... Mac, Craftsman and the other quality tool makers were not good enough for me... Only Snap-on... unless they didn't make the tool I wanted/needed. I'd only buy Craftsman when I wanted tools I would/could abuse because Sears had such a great warranty. Today, Craftsman is plenty good for my needs.

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Old 03-29-12, 08:59 AM
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Old timers never used one and pretty much they still are not using them, probably we still have the touch
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Old 03-29-12, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by PixelPaul View Post
Harbor Freight tools are pure garbage. Only use for their stuff would be if you need a tool cheap for a one time job. I don't understand the individual who will spend $$$$$ on a bike and then skimp on the cheapest piece of crap tool to maintain it?
Yes and no. I agree that the hand tools are crap and I would not buy screwdrivers, hammers, pliers, wrenches etc from HF if they were intended for serious use.

But other specialty tools can be reasonable. I just bought a 6" digital caliper from HF last week for $20. Not as good as an expensive one but certainly good enough for my purposes. I tested it on some seatposts and the caliper was within 0.05mm on all the posts I have laying around assuming they are exactly in spec.

I'd get the torque wrench but I already have one I can borrow, and I do a lot by feel..
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Old 03-29-12, 09:25 AM
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If a took does the job well, it doesn't matter how much it cost. You pay an awful lot for Snap-on cachet.
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Old 03-29-12, 11:22 AM
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expensive or cheap, old or new, in the correct hands any measure of force is valuable

don't quite agree HF stuff is junk
there is also a point that torque is set not only for proper tightening but also to apply the force necessary to stretch a bolt-

admit old timers can have the feel- also feel they most likely have a torque wrench somewhere- agree there's nothing wrong with buying the best money can buy- nothing wrong with buying inexpensive either

think it's good the OP posted this- looks like a tool that would get the job done and very reasonable
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Old 03-29-12, 09:07 PM
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for a little bit more you COULD just get a Park tools TW-2, I believe it's also made in USA.
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Old 03-29-12, 11:44 PM
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Ditto what ben4345 wrote. HF is great for a lot of stuff, but I would get a "good" torque wrench for cycling needs.
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Old 03-30-12, 12:02 AM
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Originally Posted by durrrell View Post
I just picked one up. I didn't have a coupon, so I lingered around the store until I found someone that wasn't gonna use theirs and they gave me the coupon... Otherwise it's still on sale for $17. Still a good price. This is for a clicker type, 1/4" drive.
I once threw a clicker type which didn't click at the right time through my garage door.

My garage door was closed at the time.
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Old 03-30-12, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by FastJake View Post
Yes and no. I agree that the hand tools are crap and I would not buy screwdrivers, hammers, pliers, wrenches etc from HF if they were intended for serious use.

But other specialty tools can be reasonable. I just bought a 6" digital caliper from HF last week for $20. Not as good as an expensive one but certainly good enough for my purposes. I tested it on some seatposts and the caliper was within 0.05mm on all the posts I have laying around assuming they are exactly in spec.

I'd get the torque wrench but I already have one I can borrow, and I do a lot by feel..
Their nicer 6 inch digital caliper is now on sale in the flyer I got today for $11.99. No bike hobbyist should be without one. Regular price $29.99. Be sure to take a free item coupon with you and pick up a free tape measure, flashlight, or whatever.

On HF tools, it really depends on the tool and the application. I like their T handle metric wrenches (on sale right now for $5.99), I've used them for years. On screwdrivers, I like something better. I also like something better for a ratchet (like my Snap on). But in general, the truck tool stuff is grossly expensive. I was looking for a set of ratcheting combo wrenches. Gear Wrench on sale for $19.99; Snap On's version was $250.....

Last edited by wrk101; 03-30-12 at 08:16 AM.
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Old 03-30-12, 09:48 AM
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1:Clicker type torque wrench is the least accurate of all types.You have to pray that it's correct.

2:ALL torque wrenches are an educated guess,nothing more.Cheap or expensive.

3:The type of lube you use will change the ACTUAL clamping force more than the least accurate torque wrench.Actual clamping force can vary by 50%!!!!! from one type lube to another using the same setting on a torque wrench.

4: People that use a torque wrench for critical fasteners should be lined up and shot.Spaceship,race car,and airplane mechanics ect... should not own torque wrenches....there are some things you shouldn't guess at......

5:That torque wrench will work fine for a bicycle.It's not that bad for the money,I'd use it on my bike if I needed one.

6:If you REALLY want to know what the clamping force is,you measure bolt stretch,that eliminates all external factors.( lube,friction,the wrench,temps,ect.) If you measure bolt stretch,you can tighten the fastener with Vice Grips!

7: Torque wrenches are not all that everybody thinks they are.When a company,say Ford,says a head bolt is suppose to be 75 ft/lbs,that number comes from many hours of testing with lubes that the average mechanic would have around the shop.It is NOT the ideal setting for the particular fastener at hand.It's a guess,it's something that the regular mechanic,Joe Blow like us,can do to come close to the correct setting,without having fancy bolts or equipment.

The most important fastener on a car engine is the head bolts.These days with torque-to-yield fasteners,you don't even use a torque wrench for final tightening,you measure degrees.Like,torque the bolts to 30 ft/lbs with 2 final rounds of 90* turns or some such.If that isn't a guess,I don't know what is.It's getting to be that half the fasteners on engines these days are torque to yield,can't get much less accurite than that.It's fast.....but.....

Last edited by Booger1; 03-30-12 at 10:40 AM.
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Old 03-30-12, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Booger1 View Post
1:Clicker type torque wrench is the least accurate of all types.You have to pray that it's correct.

2:ALL torque wrenches are an educated guess,nothing more.Cheap or expensive.

3:The type of lube you use will change the ACTUAL clamping force more than the least accurate torque wrench.Actual clamping force can vary by 50%!!!!! from one type lube to another using the same setting on a torque wrench.

4: People that use a torque wrench for critical fasteners should be lined up and shot.Spaceship,race car,and airplane mechanics ect... should not own torque wrenches....there are some things you shouldn't guess at......

5:That torque wrench will work fine for a bicycle.It's not that bad for the money,I'd use it on my bike if I needed one.

6:If you REALLY want to know what the clamping force is,you measure bolt stretch,that eliminates all external factors.( lube,friction,the wrench,temps,ect.) If you measure bolt stretch,you can tighten the fastener with Vice Grips!

7: Torque wrenches are not all that everybody thinks they are.When a company,say Ford,says a head bolt is suppose to be 75 ft/lbs,that number comes from many hours of testing with lubes that the average mechanic would have around the shop.It is NOT the ideal setting for the particular fastener at hand.It's a guess,it's something that the regular mechanic,Joe Blow like us,can do to come close to the correct setting,without having fancy bolts or equipment.

The most important fastener on a car engine is the head bolts.These days with torque-to-yield fasteners,you don't even use a torque wrench for final tightening,you measure degrees.Like,torque the bolts to 30 ft/lbs with 2 final rounds of 90* turns or some such.If that isn't a guess,I don't know what is.It's getting to be that half the fasteners on engines these days are torque to yield,can't get much less accurite than that.It's fast.....but.....
I happened to graduate from Whapeton State School of Science- main course was auto mechanics-

also was a Service Manager for a Ford Dealership for some years

I also had an automoblie repair business- specialized in engine rebuilding

your list makes me laugh

oh btw- any mechanic at Olathe Ford who was installing a head would be fired if not using a torque wrench
back at ya

Last edited by shadow12; 03-30-12 at 03:13 PM. Reason: needed to add
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Old 03-30-12, 12:44 PM
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Your laugh makes me wonder......

Have you ever seen a device that measures clamping force with sound waves? Ever use that at Ford?....or school.....or your engine rebuilding shop.I use it everyday at mine.If I catch somebody using a torque wrench at my shop,it better be on the machines.

Here:some basics

https://www.ge-mcs.com/download/ultra...ke3-theory.pdf

These have been widely use in industry for 30+ years,for those that really need it.

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Old 03-30-12, 03:09 PM
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Booger- btw- nice handle

you ever really had any experience building engines

you laugh at torque wrences

any mechanic not using a torque wrench on cylinder heads at Olathe Ford in the 70's would have been fired on the spot
back at ya

Last edited by shadow12; 03-30-12 at 03:16 PM. Reason: need to add
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Old 04-02-12, 04:47 AM
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On my Yamaha tZ250 Motorcycle GP road racing engines, I'd had disassemble the engine top end after every race. Most competitive racers/tuners/mechanics would as well and would use a torque wrench. Whether the wrench was accurate or not, the most important thing was that the wrench was consistent so that the head bolts had equal pressure to avoid warpage, fluid leakage, compression leakage etc. My aluminum watercooled cylinder heads tightening was probably the most critical imho and so I always used my Snap-on torque wrench. But wrenching on air cooled engines or any engine for that matter, the cylinder bolts all need equal tightening force for the aforementioned reasons.
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Old 04-02-12, 06:45 AM
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Another topic that elicits religious fervor. Right up there with greasing square tapers.
Keep it coming.
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Old 04-02-12, 09:15 AM
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The story I've heard about Harbor Freight is that they are sort of a "farm league" for up and coming manufacturers in China. In other words, they get cheap prices from new suppliers that have no reputation and are still refining their manufacturing process and quality control. As the manufacturer's product improves, it gets to the point where it can charge more for its products than Harbor Freight is willing to pay. So they part ways, HF finds another supplier, and the cycle restarts.

The problem is, on any given day, you don't know if you're buying a tool from a new guy who just entered the league and is totally green, or a AAA player who is just about to go pro.
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Old 04-02-12, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by durrrell View Post
On my Yamaha tZ250 Motorcycle GP road racing engines, I'd had disassemble the engine top end after every race. Most competitive racers/tuners/mechanics would as well and would use a torque wrench. Whether the wrench was accurate or not, the most important thing was that the wrench was consistent so that the head bolts had equal pressure to avoid warpage, fluid leakage, compression leakage etc. My aluminum watercooled cylinder heads tightening was probably the most critical imho and so I always used my Snap-on torque wrench. But wrenching on air cooled engines or any engine for that matter, the cylinder bolts all need equal tightening force for the aforementioned reasons.
good point- I and a few other motocross mechanics agree-
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Old 04-02-12, 12:41 PM
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I didn't say don't use a torque wrench,I said there are better ways.....big difference.

You worked on cars in the seventies.......I've worked on cars SINCE the sixties......everyday!

Last edited by Booger1; 04-02-12 at 12:46 PM.
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Old 04-02-12, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Booger1 View Post
People that use a torque wrench for critical fasteners should be lined up and shot.Spaceship,race car,and airplane mechanics ect... should not own torque wrenches....there are some things you shouldn't guess at......
Originally Posted by Booger1 View Post
I didn't say don't use a torque wrench,I said there are better ways.....big difference.
Am I allowed to use a torque wrench on the my bicycle? Or does that fall under the category of "critical fasteners"?
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Old 04-02-12, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by ben4345 View Post
My dad has a machine that can measure and test a torque wrenches to see if they are accurate at his shop. He keeps telling me not to get the ones had Harbor Freight and that they are not very accurate.
Compared to the torque spec? which is about 50% ?? He just doesn't get it.

Originally Posted by PixelPaul View Post
Harbor Freight tools are pure garbage.
Some are pretty bad, but the torque wrenches (as most hand tools) are merely mediocre. They will certainly do the job a cyclist needs done! (and the price is right)

Originally Posted by Booger1 View Post
1: <bullcookies>

2: <bullcookies>

3: <true, but how does that apply to the question?>

4: <triple bullcookies>

5: <thanks, but why surround this statement with nonsense? You devalue your credibility.>

6: <also true, but not germane>

7: <more bullcookies>
Originally Posted by FastJake View Post
Am I allowed to use a torque wrench on the my bicycle? Or does that fall under the category of "critical fasteners"?
There are a few fasteners that you should use a torque wrench (or the equivalent) on. Clamps on carbon fiber, crank bolts, any fastener in aluminum. Anything you don't know about how tight it should be.

A torque wrench isn't a panacea. You have to know how to clean and lube (or not) the fastener, how to use the TW, and which one is appropriate. For instance, never trust a wrench in the top or bottom 10% of its range - get one that puts the spec in the middle of its range.


I'm surprised torque wrenches are taking on the trappings of religious icons. Seems that some have become more interested in controversy than in how to mechanic...
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Old 04-02-12, 03:16 PM
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Hope the tools are at least a little better than the web site. I tried to look at their flyer online, but the 'zoom' button only enlarges it to about 80% of the size and clarity it would need to be actually readable. I tried to complain via the "feedback" form but the comment box on the form wasn't active - couldn't enter anything. Then clicked the Submit button and nothing happened. Hilarious mess of a web site.

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