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Nuevation C50 3rd Spoke Broken Don't Know What to Do

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Nuevation C50 3rd Spoke Broken Don't Know What to Do

Old 05-01-12, 09:18 AM
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jfmckenna
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Nuevation C50 3rd Spoke Broken Don't Know What to Do

I got a hold of a Neuvation C50 tubular wheel set from a friend last year. I was only intending on racing on these. So the second race I did I broke a drive side spoke. I contacted Neuvation and they sent me 3 spare spokes. I just replaced the last one this weekend. 5 races and 3 broken spokes does not leave a very good taste in my mouth concerning Neuvation wheels. I broke one on the drive side and the other two were on the non drive side and they always break right at the 90 degree angle coming out of the flange.

I can probably never trust these things again. Quite frankly I'm pissed, it sucks wondering WTH is wrong with you in a race only to find out you've been riding your brake the entire time due to a broken spoke

I think it's just a bad design. Granted I do weigh 200lbs but still I have other low spoke wheels that have had zero problems and have taken quite a pounding. And I'm not hitting pot holes or anything. Typically it happens when I put power down in a climb the first two broke this way, the last one I'm not so sure. But typically I start to hear a spoke tweaking sound and then a short time after that it snaps.

The hubs are built such that the spokes come out in pairs. The holes are not evenly spaced around the perimeter of the flange. All the spokes exit on the same side and they are 2x.

I'm probably just going to get rid of them because like I said I just cannot trust them anymore. But I was wondering your opinions. Maybe just have the whole thing rebuilt? Maybe try a new hub with a 3x pattern? Radial? IDK???

regards.
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Old 05-01-12, 11:56 AM
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200lbs is starting to push it a bit; IMO your other low-spoke-count wheels must be pretty decent, or just heavier.

My advice is not to worry about bling on the rear; it doesn't see much air anyway. Have your fancy wheel on the front where it does some good, and isn't too weak.

But on the rear, I'd go for a good old 32h or 28h Shimano hub with butted spokes, and an Aerohead OC. The 405g rim seems about right for racing under a 200lb guy, and the OC spoke bed will mean it's heaps stronger than a plain Aerohead. Dunno if you'd contemplate a clincher for racing, though.

Or you could spring for something like these; a big guy needs a strrong rear wheel, and trying to build a strong rear wheel without an OCR is just dumb.
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Old 05-01-12, 01:53 PM
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That's not what I wanted to hear Kimmo but I think I already know that you are right. I only race on tubulars these days but I had a low spoke count 30mm profile set built by Mike Garcia, clinchers, that took quite a beating. Also have a set of Rolfs in 30 mm also and there is only 16 spokes, different style I guess but still. I can use that one as the rear.
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Old 05-01-12, 02:04 PM
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Were the spokes nicked by the chain having dropped inside the large cog? The slightest nick can cause a spoke to break. I have a set of Neuvations that have been solid but I did have a situation where a bent DR hanger caused the chain to drop against the spokes of another wheel. Sure enough, several hundred miles later one broke. I replaced all drive-side spokes and the wheel has been find for 3000 miles so far.
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Old 05-01-12, 02:48 PM
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I'll have to check but two out of the three were on the non drive side so I guess that would not be the case.
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Old 05-01-12, 03:58 PM
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At 200 pounds you shouldn't expect much from a 24 spoke wheel. A 32 or 36 would be a reliable wheel for your weight and strength.
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Old 05-03-12, 02:09 AM
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A Rolf 16h rim on the rear? Paired spokes, right? With almost 45 degrees between spoke pairs, you're looking at a beefy rim.

I guess you prefer a flywheel effect to quicker acceleration and braking then? Swings and roundabouts there; lightness isn't everything.

But the real advantage of low spoke counts is aerodynamics, which hardly counts on the rear. Which is why I say forget about aero for the rear, and concentrate on maximising the strength/weight tradeoff.

Which for the rear, I maintain involves a Shimano hub and off-centre rim... unfortunately, there seems to be bugger-all OC tubulars, which is a shame. A tubeless tyre might help bridge the performance gap... but then, how much grip do you need on the rear? Maybe just a tubular on the front would be the go?
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Old 05-03-12, 12:59 PM
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I had to look up what off-centre rim is as I never heard of it. Good idea. I think there is still significant traction in the rear and it's not just that why I like tubulars but for the over all feel over bumps and such it helps on long rides. Thanks for all your replies.
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