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Peloton44 06-27-12 09:36 PM

Made in France Chain
 
I broke a chain on my Schwinn Peloton with the intention of installing a quick release KMS master link. I then realized the chain is made in France by a company called Sedis. It seems thicker and has a slightly different profile that does not match the master link. Is it possible to rejoin the chain by re-using the links I broke off? Any ideas on how to made the KMS work? Or should I just buy a new chain? Thanks.

DannoXYZ 06-27-12 09:42 PM

For about 15-years from the early '80s the Sedis Sedisport was the chain most commonly used in the market. Was eventually bought out by Sachs. It's most likely a 7/8-spd chain and wider than the modern-day 9 & 10-spd chains. At this point, you have several options:

1. You can rejoin the original link if you didn't push out the pin all the way. I usually count 9 half-turns of the pin-tool. This leaves a little stub of the pin protruding inside the plate and requires bending the chain sideways to free the link. If so, you can just push it back in with the chain-tool after re-assembling the link. Then flex that link laterally a couple times to loosen it up. If you've pushed the pin out all the way, it's a bugger to get back in. If the angle is slightly off from the hole and you push it in, it may widen the hole enough to not be a tight fit and the chain may break there under shifting.

2. get a wider master-link, measure with calipers 1st

3. get a new chain.

fietsbob 06-27-12 10:46 PM

If its been on the road, for 20 years, you probably need a new chain.
probably the cogs on the back too.. freewheel etc.

I think Sedis sport brought in the bushingless chain design..

Regina was still a full bushing type.. separate sleeve in the inner plate.. around the pin.
now that is restricted to single speed types.

Ira B 06-28-12 09:05 AM

Those were actually darn good chains. If it is still serviceable, I would give it a good cleaning and lube and re-install with chain tool.

Peloton44 06-28-12 09:37 AM


Originally Posted by Ira B (Post 14416125)
Those were actually darn good chains. If it is still serviceable, I would give it a good cleaning and lube and re-install with chain tool.

That would be my preference - so do I just try and line it all up with my chain tool and try to force it back in (the pins were completely removed)?

Asi 06-28-12 09:58 AM

If you drove the pin out completely it may be easier to shorten two links out of it (if that is not a problem).
By shortening you remove the link where you drove out the pin.

On industrial chains I use this guy's method of joining chains: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUVhTaGZDf0 (rather than using a large mechanic-hydraulic press tool that I don't have). - works on some SSP chains but I do not advise it when a chain tool for bike chains is so cheap. But the principles are the same with almost every chain.

On 1/8" single speed chains I usually break them at any point, reconnect them with the same pin, numerous of times, times and times again.. lasts forever. Very forgiving.

Ira B 06-28-12 11:18 AM


Originally Posted by Peloton44 (Post 14416255)
That would be my preference - so do I just try and line it all up with my chain tool and try to force it back in (the pins were completely removed)?

That will probably not go well.
As previously suggested, if you have enough slack in the chain, go to the next male link and shorten the chain.

cny-bikeman 06-28-12 11:30 AM

I agree the Sedis chains were great, and yes they were the originators of the modern "bushingless" design. Do not try to push the pin in after removal. It's always a good idea to leave the pin in.

The chain may or may not be worn, as we don't know if it was original equipment - the bike would have been Suntour equipped. Look to Sheldon or Park sites to determine how worn the chain is. If minor you can swap to a new one and keep the same rear cog. There is a NOS Sedis on eBay for $28 including shipping if you want to get another one, but a new 7/8 speed chain with a master link might be the best choice.

p.s. Hope you turned out OK on the frame damage issue!


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