Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Why there is a spring in the noodle connector in front V-Brake

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Why there is a spring in the noodle connector in front V-Brake

Old 09-01-12, 05:09 PM
  #1  
loubapache
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
loubapache's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Western MI
Posts: 262

Bikes: 2015 Windsor Oxford; 2012 Trek T900; 2008 Iron Horse Commuter; 1999 Specialized Stumpjumper M2 Pro; 1999 Kona Lava Dome; 1992 Trek 520 Tour; 1980 Fuji Grand Tour SE; 1973 Raleigh LTD-3; 1956 Robin Hood; 198x Worksman Industrial Trike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Why there is a spring in the noodle connector in front V-Brake

I recently got a Trek T900 Tandem bike. The front brakes are a little soft and I have been trying to get them firmer. The rear brakes are nice and firm.

After some careful examination, I cannot see a "traditional" ferrule inside the noodle connector. The rear brakes do have the "traditional" ferrule inside the noodle connector.

I thought I found the problem. So I cut the cable end and tried to add a ferrule and re-do the front brakes. To my surprise, there is a spring inside the noodle connector, then a tiny ferrule. It goes like: casing -> spring -> a tiny ferrule -> noodle connector -> noodle. The rear brakes are simply: casing -> ferrule -> noodle connector -> noodle,

Has anybody seen this?

Anyway, I added a "traditional" ferrule and the front brakes are better. However, under hard squeeze of the lever, I can still feel a little softness, unlike the rock hard feeling of the rear brakes.

TIA.

Last edited by loubapache; 09-01-12 at 05:13 PM.
loubapache is offline  
Old 09-01-12, 05:17 PM
  #2  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,049

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4331 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Bicycle ABS.

We live in a litigious age (at least in the USA). There are lots of stories about people over applying front brakes and going over the bars. I really have no idea how often this happens, or if it's even possible on a tandem. I also don't know anybody that can't modulate his brakes, but it remains a concern.

Combine stupidity, ineptitude, with a CYA attitude in a litigious society, and you get a spring in the front brake to prevent front wheel lockup. I doubt it actually can be relied on in a pinch, but at least in court a maker can say they tried.

If you promise never to say I suggested this, you might - at your own risk, of course, and you didn't read it here - replace the noodle with a standard rear noodle, and solve the problem. Of course any modification voids the warranty.

BTW- this post will self destruct in 20 minutes.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

Last edited by FBinNY; 09-01-12 at 05:22 PM.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 09-01-12, 05:24 PM
  #3  
loubapache
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
loubapache's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Western MI
Posts: 262

Bikes: 2015 Windsor Oxford; 2012 Trek T900; 2008 Iron Horse Commuter; 1999 Specialized Stumpjumper M2 Pro; 1999 Kona Lava Dome; 1992 Trek 520 Tour; 1980 Fuji Grand Tour SE; 1973 Raleigh LTD-3; 1956 Robin Hood; 198x Worksman Industrial Trike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks, FB, for the great info. I did not know that but understand why now.

Well, it is under warranty so I am going to let it stay this way. As soon as the warranty is over, I am going to retro-fit as the rear brakes.

Funny thing is that we have two other bikes with V-brakes and they do not have that spring in the front brakes. One of them was bought last year so it has been fairly new.
loubapache is offline  
Old 09-01-12, 05:28 PM
  #4  
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 31,344

Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1089 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What make and model brakes are these? A few months ago I fit a set of Avid Single Digit 7 V-brakes to my Cross Check and neither pair has anything but the standard ferrule at the end of the casing and both have nearly identical "feel".
HillRider is offline  
Old 09-01-12, 05:31 PM
  #5  
loubapache
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
loubapache's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Western MI
Posts: 262

Bikes: 2015 Windsor Oxford; 2012 Trek T900; 2008 Iron Horse Commuter; 1999 Specialized Stumpjumper M2 Pro; 1999 Kona Lava Dome; 1992 Trek 520 Tour; 1980 Fuji Grand Tour SE; 1973 Raleigh LTD-3; 1956 Robin Hood; 198x Worksman Industrial Trike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The brakes on the Trek T900 are:

Tektro alloy linear-pull brakes with Tektro adjustable reach alloy, Kraton inserts levers.
loubapache is offline  
Old 09-01-12, 05:35 PM
  #6  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,049

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4331 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The spring in the front brake noodle is a trade off. It may (not will) prevent front wheel lockup and an endo. OTOH, if there's sufficient loss of braking force it will increase braking distance materially, increasing the risk of a collision. I'm not advising anybody here, and each should make their own decision, but I think it's a poor trade off.

Possibly it makes sense for bikes sold to newbies, but in short order the need disappears. On a tandem especially, I can't see applying a brake hard enough to go over (not sure it's even possible given the weight distribution), and I'd much rather have the added braking power in an emergency.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 09-01-12, 05:39 PM
  #7  
loubapache
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
loubapache's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Western MI
Posts: 262

Bikes: 2015 Windsor Oxford; 2012 Trek T900; 2008 Iron Horse Commuter; 1999 Specialized Stumpjumper M2 Pro; 1999 Kona Lava Dome; 1992 Trek 520 Tour; 1980 Fuji Grand Tour SE; 1973 Raleigh LTD-3; 1956 Robin Hood; 198x Worksman Industrial Trike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I agree that to experienced riders, this is a negative thing because it decreases braking efficiency.

I have been riding bike for about 40 years and have never experienced or seen anyone with locking front brakes. I guess it is theoretically possible on a steep own-hill PLUS that the rider ONLY applies the front brakes.
loubapache is offline  
Old 09-01-12, 06:14 PM
  #8  
Burton
Certified Bike Brat
 
Burton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 4,251
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The item you are describing is commonly called a brake modulator and is found on front brakes of hybrids equipped with V-brakes from a variety of manufacturers. Shimano describes the units function in their technical documents:

(SI-8DV0B-001) The power modulator is a device that makes it easier to control braking by increasing the cable stroke at the brake lever within a certain constant range of braking force......... The power modulator is not equipped with a function to prevent the wheel from locking up.
Burton is offline  
Old 09-01-12, 06:32 PM
  #9  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,049

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4331 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Burton View Post
The item you are describing is commonly called a brake modulator and is found on front brakes of hybrids equipped with V-brakes from a variety of manufacturers. Shimano describes the units function in their technical documents:
Welcome to the world of NewSpeak. If someone were making a modification to reduce the chances of front wheel over-braking or lockup, the very last thing they would say is that it prevents lockup. Think of the legal implications if they called them anti-lockup devices.

There is no advantage in increasing lever travel with engaged brakes, since people modulate by force not movement, so there's another agenda here, and you don't have to be a genius to figure it out.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 09-01-12, 09:23 PM
  #10  
LarDasse74
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Grid Reference, SK
Posts: 3,768

Bikes: I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think the warranty comment was a joke. If you are worried about the warranty just consult with the shop where you bought the bike.

I have never heard of putting a Bicycle ABS brake noodle on a tandem. That sounds really wrong.

Anybody ever hear of this?

Maybe put in place for someone who didn't have total control over her/his hand movements.
LarDasse74 is offline  
Old 09-01-12, 09:49 PM
  #11  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,049

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4331 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
I think the warranty comment was a joke.
Yes, simply alluding to warranty boilerplate.

Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
I have never heard of putting a Bicycle ABS brake noodle on a tandem. That sounds really wrong.
The ABS comment was sort of a joke too, but the rest of the post was straight. I don't know what to call this,but the idea isn't new. Someone else did something similar some 30+ years ago, but got rid of it a year or two later. Don't ask me for details or a citation, it's just a case of Deja vu all over again.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 09-01-12, 09:56 PM
  #12  
LarDasse74
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Grid Reference, SK
Posts: 3,768

Bikes: I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have plenty of experience with the normal spring loaded noodle or hinge 'ABS' system. Surely you don't mean you have seen them on tandems before?
LarDasse74 is offline  
Old 09-01-12, 10:00 PM
  #13  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,049

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4331 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
I have plenty of experience with the normal spring loaded noodle or hinge 'ABS' system. Surely you don't mean you have seen them on tandems before?
No, they were on entry level solo bikes some time back. I don't think this is smart for any bike, but it's one order higher of uselessness on a tandem.

I'd say it makes me wonder who's spec'ing bikes these days, but I'm long past wondering about that.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 09-02-12, 10:47 AM
  #14  
Burton
Certified Bike Brat
 
Burton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 4,251
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
Welcome to the world of NewSpeak. If someone were making a modification to reduce the chances of front wheel over-braking or lockup, the very last thing they would say is that it prevents lockup. Think of the legal implications if they called them anti-lockup devices.

There is no advantage in increasing lever travel with engaged brakes, since people modulate by force not movement, so there's another agenda here, and you don't have to be a genius to figure it out.
I guess you're free to read whatever you want to out of that. Personally I think it has more to do with the average consumer shopping for a hybrid buying based on total features rather than quality. Haven't seen a decent front suspension on a hybrid yet but people seem to think they're getting 'more' just because the front end moves a little too.

If this was really an attempt at an anti-lock braking system - I'd think you'd see similar attempts for disc brakes, cantis and road brakes and I personally haven't seen any.
Burton is offline  
Old 09-02-12, 11:00 AM
  #15  
Drew Eckhardt 
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Sunnyvale, CA USA
Posts: 5,661
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 258 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by loubapache View Post
Thanks, [COLOR=#3E3E3E][FONT=Arial]FB, for the great info. I did not know that but understand why now.

Well, it is under warranty so I am going to let it stay this way. As soon as the warranty is over, I am going to retro-fit as the rear brakes.
I'd be a lot more worried about having full brakes going down-hill than the warranty on a $12 V brake. Especially on a tandem where a brake that can't lock the wheel on a solo bike will be providing half that minimal deceleration.

My wife and I bought some comfort bikes with those @#$%^ crippled brakes and they were scary with a bit of pad wear.

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 09-02-12 at 11:56 AM.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Old 09-02-12, 11:17 AM
  #16  
loubapache
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
loubapache's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Western MI
Posts: 262

Bikes: 2015 Windsor Oxford; 2012 Trek T900; 2008 Iron Horse Commuter; 1999 Specialized Stumpjumper M2 Pro; 1999 Kona Lava Dome; 1992 Trek 520 Tour; 1980 Fuji Grand Tour SE; 1973 Raleigh LTD-3; 1956 Robin Hood; 198x Worksman Industrial Trike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The warranty is not just about the $12 V brake. If something does happen, then they can void it for everything on the bike and frame.

Where we ride is pretty flat and we only go up to about 16 MPH max so with the experience I have, I think we should be fine. The wife does not want us to go too fast. I was talking to her about replacing the stock 26x2.0 tires with narrower ones and she did not want me to do that.

The "traditional" ferrule I add did firm up the brakes. I guess it must have gone into that spring a bit so effectively I have a shorter spring in it now for the firmer brakes.
loubapache is offline  
Old 09-02-12, 11:29 AM
  #17  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,049

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4331 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by loubapache View Post
The wife does not want us to go too fast. I was talking to her about replacing the stock 26x2.0 tires with narrower ones and she did not want me to do that.

.
In the end enjoying the bike is what it's really about. Any improvement in the mechanics is a losing proposition if it causes marital discord.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 09-02-12, 11:30 AM
  #18  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 40,362

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 179 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6368 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Get the wife a suspension seat post , since stokers don't see the bumps,
like the eyes in the front..

yes a springless V noodle will be fine..

If this is a straight bar rig .. I really Like German Magura's Hydraulic Rim brakes ..
their double wheel cylinder system Uses the V mounts.

The very long rear cable to the brakes is stretchy, But, like in your Car, compressing
a fluid will be similar , long separation between the lever or caliper , or short.

Last edited by fietsbob; 09-02-12 at 11:34 AM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 09-02-12, 11:35 AM
  #19  
loubapache
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
loubapache's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Western MI
Posts: 262

Bikes: 2015 Windsor Oxford; 2012 Trek T900; 2008 Iron Horse Commuter; 1999 Specialized Stumpjumper M2 Pro; 1999 Kona Lava Dome; 1992 Trek 520 Tour; 1980 Fuji Grand Tour SE; 1973 Raleigh LTD-3; 1956 Robin Hood; 198x Worksman Industrial Trike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The stoker does have a suspension seat post. The captain does not, though.

The Trek T900 is actually drilled for disc brakes. Some people have replaced the stock V brakes with disc brakes. For us now, I think the V brakes are fine.
loubapache is offline  
Old 12-30-13, 06:54 PM
  #20  
dblA
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Campbell, CA
Posts: 19

Bikes: Used to have a 20 year old Cilo, beautiful, but went to nirwana the other day. No decision yet as to replacement. Meantime share Trek T900 tandem with my wife.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
We bought our T900 2 months ago and I can't find this "noodle" thing on my front break. However I have no idea what a "noodle" is if it is not on my plate. So maybe I looked at all the wrong places. But maybe they have changed their minds about it and install the breaks in the original shape. I think if somebody explains the "noodle" for us lay people I am not the only one who would appreciate it. As far as using them goes I don't feel much difference between the two breaks at the levers. I find the breaking power adequate, but not overwhelming, i.e. a fast stop downhill (I am not talking long descents, they don't exist where we bike) is not possible.

I have tightened the cables somewhat (as much as I could without having the breaks touch the rims without being engaged), so one can apply some more force, but it does not seem to help much, maybe the pads just aren't up to more. I read at several places that better pads help; I am just a bit concerned about them grinding down the rims even faster...
dblA is offline  
Old 12-30-13, 07:07 PM
  #21  
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 31,344

Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1089 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Zombie thread but welcome to the forum.

First, excuse the spelling lesson but they are brakes. Breaks means something fractures. The "noodle" in V-brake terminology is the curved metal tube that guides the cable into the nearer vertical arm of the brakes.
HillRider is offline  
Old 12-30-13, 07:38 PM
  #22  
FastJake
Constant tinkerer
 
FastJake's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 7,640
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Zombie thread but welcome to the forum.
+1

It's almost always better to start a new thread than dig up an old one. But the BEST thing you can do is SEARCH. Google "V-brake noodle" and I bet you'll figure it out from there.

Get some Kool Stop pads. They are the best and should increase your stopping power over whatever OEM pad you have.
FastJake is offline  
Old 01-06-14, 06:32 PM
  #23  
dblA
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Campbell, CA
Posts: 19

Bikes: Used to have a 20 year old Cilo, beautiful, but went to nirwana the other day. No decision yet as to replacement. Meantime share Trek T900 tandem with my wife.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks to both of you. I have meanwhile noticed my spelling error myself. As to the noodle: I don't find any spring in there that would modulate the braking. It seems that TREK has stopped putting those in (or maybe my dealer chose to omit the brake modulator when they assembled the bike). I will follow your advice and buy Kool Stop pads, especially since I hear a braking noise that sounds like sanding off my rims with the pads that we have now. Also a squeal on the front wheel (which some reviewers on Amazon report to go away with Kool Stops while others say the squeal will be worse than ever...).

Last edited by dblA; 01-06-14 at 06:33 PM. Reason: speling error corrected
dblA is offline  
Old 01-06-14, 09:35 PM
  #24  
Kimmo
bike whisperer
 
Kimmo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Melbourne, Oz
Posts: 7,818

Bikes: https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=152015&p=1404231

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 330 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dblA View Post
I will follow your advice and buy Kool Stop pads, especially since I hear a braking noise that sounds like sanding off my rims with the pads that we have now.
Any pads, no matter how good, will suffer to some extent from foreign material getting embedded in the pad, which works like a seed for the aluminium of the rim to collect on it, forming a growing chunk of abrasive grit that grinds a groove into the brake surface.

The only way to deal with it is to periodically clean your pads, more often when riding in the wet.
Kimmo is offline  
Old 01-07-14, 02:47 PM
  #25  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,391

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
On a tandem especially, I can't see applying a brake hard enough to go over (not sure it's even possible given the weight distribution)
Seriously! That'd be pretty impressive if somebody could brake hard enough to do an endo on a tandem! I'd like to see some YouTube of that...
RubeRad is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.