Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Build or Buy

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Build or Buy

Old 09-04-12, 08:22 PM
  #1  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Flat Rock, NC
Posts: 464
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 109 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 32 Posts
Build or Buy

I'm in the market for a new set of 700c wheels. I prefer Shimano hubs and I like to build my own wheels. But with
places like Bicycle Wheel Warehouse, I can buy 2 sets of wheels for what it would cost me to build 1 set myself.

What a poor spoke head supposed to do?
coupster is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 08:25 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA USA and Golden, CO USA
Posts: 6,341

Bikes: 97 Litespeed, 50-39-30x13-26 10 cogs, Campagnolo Ultrashift, retroreflective rims on SON28/PowerTap hubs

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 550 Post(s)
Liked 324 Times in 225 Posts
Originally Posted by coupster
I'm in the market for a new set of 700c wheels. I prefer Shimano hubs and I like to build my own wheels. But with
places like Bicycle Wheel Warehouse, I can buy 2 sets of wheels for what it would cost me to build 1 set myself.

What a poor spoke head supposed to do?
Order your hubs from the UK (where on-line retail can be lower than US wholesale), use Velocity or Kinlin rims that aren't subject to Mavic's minimum price rules, and build.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 08:28 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 13,525
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4166 Post(s)
Liked 2,882 Times in 1,760 Posts
If it has all the specs you want (the right spokes, right hub, right rims - no cheating), buy it and then loosen all the spokes an bring them up to proper tension and true yourself. If it's that cheap, it's probably machine build and re-tensioning/truing it yourself will give it better life and performance. And you get the best of both worlds.
__________________
Bikes: 1996 Eddy Merckx Titanium EX, 1989/90 Colnago Super(issimo?) Piu(?), 1990 Concorde Aquila(hit by car while riding), others in build queue "when I get the time"





himespau is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 09:04 PM
  #4  
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Grid Reference, SK
Posts: 3,768

Bikes: I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Buy the complete wheels, tear them down, build them back up.

Choose a set of wheels with the hubs and rims you want but with cheapo spokes, and buy a set of your preferred spokes, and rebuild. You can keep the extra spokes as spares.
LarDasse74 is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 09:11 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
dsbrantjr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Roswell, GA
Posts: 8,319

Bikes: '93 Trek 750, '92 Schwinn Crisscross, '93 Mongoose Alta

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1438 Post(s)
Liked 1,091 Times in 722 Posts
Welcome to the economies of scale. I've bought BWW wheels and was pleased with their build quality; mine were built as ordered, were true and well-tensioned and have held up well. Just stay away from aluminum nipples, wherever you end up buying them from.
dsbrantjr is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 09:18 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
mrrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Posts: 3,503

Bikes: 2001 Tommasini Sintesi w/ Campagnolo Daytona 10 Speed

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 144 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 34 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by coupster
I'm in the market for a new set of 700c wheels. I prefer Shimano hubs and I like to build my own wheels. But with
places like Bicycle Wheel Warehouse, I can buy 2 sets of wheels for what it would cost me to build 1 set myself.

What a poor spoke head supposed to do?
Is this a shill for Bicycle Wheel Warehouse?

We had quite a few of these last year...

The rhetorical question and the lack of a mechanical "aid" request is what raises suspicion...

=8-)
__________________
5000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
mrrabbit is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 09:43 PM
  #7  
bike whisperer
 
Kimmo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Melbourne, Oz
Posts: 9,532

Bikes: https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=152015&p=1404231

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1520 Post(s)
Liked 716 Times in 508 Posts
Originally Posted by LarDasse74
Choose a set of wheels with the hubs and rims you want but with cheapo spokes, and buy a set of your preferred spokes, and rebuild. You can keep the extra spokes as spares.
This.

I'm pretty sweet on my wheels now I've rebuilt em with some Wheelsmith semi-aeros... found a box of em, rolled the threads, and now the aero bit goes right down to the nipple
Kimmo is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 09:58 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 38,396

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5629 Post(s)
Liked 2,249 Times in 1,262 Posts
As the others say, if the spec. is spot on or very close to what you want, buy. Hubs are easy you can get just about anything you want. Rims not too hard, but IMO having the exact spokes you want is as, if not more, important than either. DB spokes in the right mix of gauges for your application is something that can make a difference between decent and great wheels. I can't buy, because I mix gauges on all my wheels, typically using 15/17 on the front, and 14/16g & 14/17g for rears.

However I disagree with the notion of buying and loosening to start fresh. Instead I'd do a quick test of the evenness in tension and radial true, and if it was reasonable close, I'd just touch it up. One trick for the rear, is to loosen left side only, and the rim moves over the right will ease off on it's own. Then you can dial in radial true, get the tension even (though still low), and true the wheel. Finish by bringing the left side tension back up while dishing it to the left and back to center (of the axle). That will save you the problems of working very tight right side nipples, and give you great results with less effort.

There are also places like Yellow Jersey, that will hand build you great wheels to your exact spec. They're not usually as cheap as mass produced wheels, but can still cost you less than the sum of the parts. Over the last 45+ years I haven't ridden any wheels not built by me, but I wouldn't hesitate to own a pair of Yellow Jersey wheels, and I wouldn't touch them until/if they needed it.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

Just because I'm tired of arguing, doesn't mean you're right.

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

Last edited by FBinNY; 09-04-12 at 10:07 PM.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 10:01 PM
  #9  
bike whisperer
 
Kimmo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Melbourne, Oz
Posts: 9,532

Bikes: https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=152015&p=1404231

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1520 Post(s)
Liked 716 Times in 508 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY
However I disagree with the notion of buying and loosening to start fresh.
Me too. If I wanted to keep the spokes, I'd unlace half the wheel anyway to bugger off the ugly machine-laced pattern.
Kimmo is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 10:22 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 38,396

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5629 Post(s)
Liked 2,249 Times in 1,262 Posts
Originally Posted by Kimmo
Me too. If I wanted to keep the spokes, I'd unlace half the wheel anyway to bugger off the ugly machine-laced pattern.
If you're talking about the left not mirroring the right, that has nothing to do with machines. It's a human consideration.

In production, spokes aren't loaded and laced the way many do one side of the flange at a time. Instead all the spokes are loaded into the hub at the same time, then the hub is fixtured, along with a rim, and spokes are brought and attached 1 crossed pair at a time. The nipple may be attached by a self feeding screwdriver, or by hand. Most right handed builders pick up and cross (over/under) the spokes with their left hand, using the right for the nipples, or to guide the tips of the spokes to the automatic screwdriver. In order to get decent time, the left hand motion is almost unconscious, and it's very difficult to learn how to mirror, without making a hash of it.

So the fastest way to do this is to lace the lower flange, then the right, and the wheel ends up non-mirrored. The other way is to lace the upper flange, stop and flip the wheel, then repeat and the wheel will come out mirrored. A good worker (usually a woman) laces about 60 wheels per hour and is usually paid piecework, so has no interest in losing 10-20 seconds to flip the wheel and doesn't, ending up with unmirrored wheels.

BTW- I lace the same way because it's faster, and eliminates scratching rims when pulling spokes through the cross. At my fat fingered speed, it's nowhere near 1 minute a wheel. So 20 seconds to flip the wheel halfway through is nothing.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

Just because I'm tired of arguing, doesn't mean you're right.

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

Last edited by FBinNY; 09-04-12 at 10:25 PM.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 10:36 PM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
mrrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Posts: 3,503

Bikes: 2001 Tommasini Sintesi w/ Campagnolo Daytona 10 Speed

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 144 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 34 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY
If you're talking about the left not mirroring the right, that has nothing to do with machines. It's a human consideration.

In production, spokes aren't loaded and laced the way many do one side of the flange at a time. Instead all the spokes are loaded into the hub at the same time, then the hub is fixtured, along with a rim, and spokes are brought and attached 1 crossed pair at a time. The nipple may be attached by a self feeding screwdriver, or by hand. Most right handed builders pick up and cross (over/under) the spokes with their left hand, using the right for the nipples, or to guide the tips of the spokes to the automatic screwdriver. In order to get decent time, the left hand motion is almost unconscious, and it's very difficult to learn how to mirror, without making a hash of it.

So the fastest way to do this is to lace the lower flange, then the right, and the wheel ends up non-mirrored. The other way is to lace the upper flange, stop and flip the wheel, then repeat and the wheel will come out mirrored. A good worker (usually a woman) laces about 60 wheels per hour and is usually paid piecework, so has no interest in losing 10-20 seconds to flip the wheel and doesn't, ending up with unmirrored wheels.

BTW- I lace the same way because it's faster, and eliminates scratching rims when pulling spokes through the cross. At my fat fingered speed, it's nowhere near 1 minute a wheel. So 20 seconds to flip the wheel halfway through is nothing.
That was necessary because?

=8-)
__________________
5000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
mrrabbit is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 10:49 PM
  #12  
bike whisperer
 
Kimmo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Melbourne, Oz
Posts: 9,532

Bikes: https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=152015&p=1404231

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1520 Post(s)
Liked 716 Times in 508 Posts
Well, the info's interesting.

Originally Posted by FBinNY
that has nothing to do with machines.
It has to do with production lines. And AFAIK, the non-mirrored pattern is referred to as 'machine-laced' by more folks than just me.
Kimmo is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 10:49 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA USA and Golden, CO USA
Posts: 6,341

Bikes: 97 Litespeed, 50-39-30x13-26 10 cogs, Campagnolo Ultrashift, retroreflective rims on SON28/PowerTap hubs

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 550 Post(s)
Liked 324 Times in 225 Posts
Originally Posted by LarDasse74
Buy the complete wheels, tear them down, build them back up.

Choose a set of wheels with the hubs and rims you want but with cheapo spokes, and buy a set of your preferred spokes, and rebuild. You can keep the extra spokes as spares.
BWW sells 105 + Open Pro rims for $269 when built with DT competition butted spokes.

Ribble sells 105 hubsets for $64
Velocity Fusions can be had off E-bay for $45 each with free shopping
DT butted spokes run about $1 each for DT Competitions (2.0/1.8) or Revolutions (2.0/1.5)
That's $218 which is still a savings after you figure in shipping.

You start with everything disassembled so you can lubricate everything _properly_ using anti-seize or grease that'll stay put for the life of the rim instead of compromising and lubricating with oil or taking nipples off, lubricating, and screwing back on.

The next time you crash a rim or wear out it's brake tracks get another for $45 (as opposed to $80 for an Open Pro, because there's no way to get around Mavic's minimum advertised price), tape it to the old one in a couple places, transfer spokes one at a time taking the opportunity to lubricate sockets and re-lubricate threads, and tension + true as you would normally.

Hub shells and spokes easily outlast rims 10:1.

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 09-05-12 at 10:01 AM.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 10:55 PM
  #14  
bike whisperer
 
Kimmo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Melbourne, Oz
Posts: 9,532

Bikes: https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=152015&p=1404231

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1520 Post(s)
Liked 716 Times in 508 Posts
And you won't have unsightly marks around the holes in one flange where you've reversed the pattern

Definitely the go if it's even a little more expensive, IMO. My first comment took for granted it was a lot more expensive.
Kimmo is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 11:12 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 38,396

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5629 Post(s)
Liked 2,249 Times in 1,262 Posts
Originally Posted by mrrabbit
That was necessary because?

=8-)
Necessary? No. But you might be making a linkage not intended in my post.

The statement was a good worker laces... The inserted parenthetical usually a woman wasn't intended to imply that good workers are usually women, but simply to say that most production wheel builders worldwide are women. I've visited numerous factories where wheels were built in high volume, and don't remember ever seeing men lacing wheels.

As a matter of fact, women are disproportionately represented in the bicycle industry workforce. I'm sure there are reasons, and can think of a few, but it's a fact regardless of the reasons.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

Just because I'm tired of arguing, doesn't mean you're right.

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

Last edited by FBinNY; 09-04-12 at 11:41 PM.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 09-04-12, 11:18 PM
  #16  
bike whisperer
 
Kimmo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Melbourne, Oz
Posts: 9,532

Bikes: https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=152015&p=1404231

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1520 Post(s)
Liked 716 Times in 508 Posts
Prolly similar reasons to why old chauvinists shop for Asian brides
Kimmo is offline  
Old 09-05-12, 12:02 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
mrrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Posts: 3,503

Bikes: 2001 Tommasini Sintesi w/ Campagnolo Daytona 10 Speed

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 144 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 34 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY
Necessary? No. But you might be making a linkage not intended in my post.

The statement was a good worker laces... The inserted parenthetical usually a woman wasn't intended to imply that good workers are usually women, but simply to say that most production wheel builders worldwide are women. I've visited numerous factories where wheels were built in high volume, and don't remember ever seeing men lacing wheels.

As a matter of fact, women are disproportionately represented in the bicycle industry workforce. I'm sure there are reasons, and can think of a few, but it's a fact regardless of the reasons.
Care to back up that fact?

=8-)
__________________
5000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
mrrabbit is offline  
Old 09-05-12, 07:50 AM
  #18  
Banned.
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 937

Bikes: CCM Torino 76

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by mrrabbit
Care to back up that fact?

=8-)
The delicate and precise work done in Asian factories is often done by women.

Also, I watched a video on 'How a Bike is Made' taken in the 50s or 60s at the Raleigh factory in England, and it was men working in the steel mill making tubes, men dipping the frames in acid bath to clean the metal, men putting the frames into the heat to bond the joints, and women lacing the wheels.
DCB0 is offline  
Old 09-05-12, 07:56 AM
  #19  
Super Moderator
 
Homebrew01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ffld Cnty Connecticut
Posts: 21,841

Bikes: Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1173 Post(s)
Liked 917 Times in 605 Posts
FWIW, I, and quite a few others, have had OpenPro rims crack around the eyelets.
__________________
Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike.

FYI: https://www.bikeforums.net/forum-sugg...ad-please.html
Homebrew01 is offline  
Old 09-05-12, 08:09 AM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
mrrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Posts: 3,503

Bikes: 2001 Tommasini Sintesi w/ Campagnolo Daytona 10 Speed

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 144 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 34 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by DCB0
The delicate and precise work done in Asian factories is often done by women.

Also, I watched a video on 'How a Bike is Made' taken in the 50s or 60s at the Raleigh factory in England, and it was men working in the steel mill making tubes, men dipping the frames in acid bath to clean the metal, men putting the frames into the heat to bond the joints, and women lacing the wheels.
Read that last sentence - which generalizes that women are disproportionately represented in the bicycle industry workforce - the industry - not one tiny specific task in the industry.

That's what needs backing up if someone is going to claim it as fact.

=8-)
__________________
5000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
mrrabbit is offline  
Old 09-05-12, 08:25 AM
  #21  
Banned.
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 937

Bikes: CCM Torino 76

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by mrrabbit
Read that last sentence - which generalizes that women are disproportionately represented in the bicycle industry workforce - the industry - not one tiny specific task in the industry.

That's what needs backing up if someone is going to claim it as fact.

=8-)
I got that. I have no hard numbers, either. However, every image I have seen of Chinese factories of all sorts is that Women are doing almost all the assembly line work. Assembling, decalling, adjusting are almost definitely done primarily by women.
DCB0 is offline  
Old 09-05-12, 08:56 AM
  #22  
Mechanic/Tourist
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Syracuse, NY
Posts: 7,522

Bikes: 2008 Novara Randonee - love it. Previous bikes:Motobecane Mirage, 1972 Moto Grand Jubilee (my fave), Jackson Rake 16, 1983 C'dale ST500.

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 486 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY
...So the fastest way to do this is to lace the lower flange, then the right, and the wheel ends up non-mirrored
Maybe it's been far too long since I built a wheel, but I'm not getting lacing one side and then the other being connected to being non-mirrored. I'm assuming mirrored means head-in/out spokes in the same direction. I eventually transitioned to filling both flanges when building wheels, inserted in the hub and laced to the rim correctly to accomplish symmetry.
cny-bikeman is offline  
Old 09-05-12, 09:25 AM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
mrrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Posts: 3,503

Bikes: 2001 Tommasini Sintesi w/ Campagnolo Daytona 10 Speed

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 144 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 34 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by DCB0
I got that. I have no hard numbers, either. However, every image I have seen of Chinese factories of all sorts is that Women are doing almost all the assembly line work. Assembling, decalling, adjusting are almost definitely done primarily by women.
Industry...not wheel building, not China, not sales, not distribution...the industry,

=8-)
__________________
5000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
mrrabbit is offline  
Old 09-05-12, 09:27 AM
  #24  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Flat Rock, NC
Posts: 464
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 109 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 32 Posts
Originally Posted by mrrabbit
Is this a shill for Bicycle Wheel Warehouse?

=8-)
No shill, but I did find them referenced here first. I may be a noob here by post count but not any other way. I have successfully built my own wheels so no need for mechanical aid. Sorry. I didn't think that the fully kitted carbon fiber roadie playpen would get me much of a useful response so I went where old wrenches go - into the toolbox.

But back on topic. Shimano Ultegra hubs, DT double butted spokes with brass nipples, 32 hole Open Pro rims. Nothing exotic or special.
BWW=$300
DIY=$450

I'm almost at the point of buying the BWW wheels and then tearing them down. But figured a run by the folks here would be a good sounding board. Thanks for all the replies.
coupster is offline  
Old 09-05-12, 10:13 AM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA USA and Golden, CO USA
Posts: 6,341

Bikes: 97 Litespeed, 50-39-30x13-26 10 cogs, Campagnolo Ultrashift, retroreflective rims on SON28/PowerTap hubs

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 550 Post(s)
Liked 324 Times in 225 Posts
Originally Posted by coupster
No shill, but I did find them referenced here first. I may be a noob here by post count but not any other way. I have successfully built my own wheels so no need for mechanical aid. Sorry. I didn't think that the fully kitted carbon fiber roadie playpen would get me much of a useful response so I went where old wrenches go - into the toolbox.

But back on topic. Shimano Ultegra hubs, DT double butted spokes with brass nipples, 32 hole Open Pro rims. Nothing exotic or special.
BWW=$300
DIY=$450

I'm almost at the point of buying the BWW wheels and then tearing them down. But figured a run by the folks here would be a good sounding board. Thanks for all the replies.
Ultegra 6700 hubs from Ribble $127 (for the set - select US dollars for your currency on the web site to find out what you pay without the 20% Value Added Tax charged to UK/EU residents).

Open Pro rims $80 x 2
DT Competition 2.0/1.8 or Revolution 2.0/1.5 spokes 64 x $1
$351 + tax.

although there are _lots_ of reasons not to use Open Pros (shallow extrusion is easier to bend, the cracking problem, inferior aerodynamics, limited color choices, minimum advertised price $30-$40 more than other rims) and once you do that you spend less.

Open Pros do arguably make sense when you already have wheels built with them and want to match the ERD so you don't need to buy new spokes and relace. Otherwise
Drew Eckhardt is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.