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spd pedal problems on longer rides

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spd pedal problems on longer rides

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Old 11-07-12, 11:00 PM
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mynameuk
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spd pedal problems on longer rides

i have a cheap set of spd pedals that have a platform pedal on one side so you can wear normal shoes if you like. they work quite well for the most part but the problem i have is that when i ride for a longer period of time it can become difficult to get released from the pedals. i have tried adjusting the spring tension but it doesn't help. anyone experienced something like this before. i'm not sure if the problem lies with the pedals or the shoes or me.

any advice is welcome. thanks.
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Old 11-07-12, 11:13 PM
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First confirm the condition of the pedal clasp and cleats. All bolts/pivots and plates need to be in good order to work well. Clean and lubed. Next the shoe's sole can contact the pedal body too much for the cleat to engage the clasp. Check for this, temp lubing with dish soap, on the sole, can help discover this problem.

But I will say more about the timing of the problem. I've heard many times of problems that only show them selves after a lengthy ride. The only aspect that changes (in the vast majority) over a ride (outside of lube washing off in rain or grime collecting) is the rider's fatigue. Many times problems can be understood by the rider's lowering awearness/focus. I am open to other explanations. Andy.
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Old 11-08-12, 02:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post

But I will say more about the timing of the problem. I've heard many times of problems that only show them selves after a lengthy ride. The only aspect that changes (in the vast majority) over a ride (outside of lube washing off in rain or grime collecting) is the rider's fatigue. Many times problems can be understood by the rider's lowering awearness/focus. I am open to other explanations. Andy.
+1

SPDs, particularly those witn little/no float disengage "best" if you've got a bit of snap to your motion. It's common for them to feel real stiff if you're twisting out slowly - which is a natural thing when you begin to feel fatigued.
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Old 11-08-12, 11:42 AM
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I have the same problem getting un-clipped from my SPDs when I am worn out from a long ride. I plan ahead and get un-clipped a little early to minimize the chances of a tombay.
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Old 11-08-12, 01:05 PM
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+1

I suspect that the variable is tiredness or loss of snap in your legs. I use Look type pedals and can snap out in either direction when fresh, but find I have more snap to the inside when I'm tired and can only release in that direction. This has become the norm for me and my right shoe has a tire scuff/wear mark on the inside of the heel.
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Old 11-08-12, 01:23 PM
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I agree on the fatigue part, but it's worth noting that SPDs can be harder to release when the cleats are worn. So, perhaps getting some fresh cleats and making sure the release tension is on the low side will help you out.
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Old 11-08-12, 01:50 PM
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Make sure your cleats are soundly secured to the shoes as well. If they are loose at all, they can be a pain to disengage from the pedal.
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Old 11-08-12, 10:31 PM
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hello again,

thanks for the replies. i had always considered the fatigue factor but it only really happens with the left foot. perhaps because my right side is stronger. i have thick mtb soles on my shoes and the pedals are quite big so perhaps what andrew was saying is worth a look. pedals and cleats are all new and in good condition.

thanks
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Old 11-08-12, 10:41 PM
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When I first installed SPD (mountain) pedals on my road bike, I loved them. After enough long rides I realized my feet were actually getting fatigued from the pedal/shoe combination.

After switching to SPD-SL (road) pedals on my road bikes only I have no regrets and would never go back to SPD mountain for long rides.
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Old 11-08-12, 11:55 PM
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Try the multi-release type of cleat. I've used them exclusively for 20 years without this issue.
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Old 11-09-12, 12:35 AM
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Originally Posted by anixi View Post
Try the multi-release type of cleat. I've used them exclusively for 20 years without this issue.
not too sure what multi-release is. can you be more specific with a brand etc thanks
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Old 11-09-12, 12:42 AM
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Originally Posted by anixi View Post
Try the multi-release type of cleat. I've used them exclusively for 20 years without this issue.
not too sure what multi-release is. can you be more specific with a brand etc thanks
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Old 11-09-12, 12:45 AM
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I switched to crank bros. eggbeaters because it's basically a easy-release spd and I like the design.
If you want more float, you install the cleat backwards. Simple. There is no adjustment.

It is very easy to clip in and out. Much easier than SPD's.
If you decide to change pedals, it's worth a look.
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Old 11-09-12, 01:02 AM
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Here you go:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-SHIMANO-...item4abdef9948

Originally Posted by mynameuk View Post
not too sure what multi-release is. can you be more specific with a brand etc thanks
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Old 11-09-12, 03:15 AM
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I would stay away from the multi-release cleats. They are marketed to people who are new to riding spd pedals allowing release when the heel of the foot is turned outward (or inward) and also at an upward angle. What often happens with new folks riding SPDs is they forget to release in time when they stop...they start pulling up with their foot instead of twisting their heel....the pedal does not release and they start to look down at the foot/pedal to see what is wrong which shifts their center of mass over to the other side of the bike to the foot that they have not even thought about trying to release....they start to fall over on this side and the angle the leg/foot is put in relative to the pedal as they try not to fall over makes it hopeless for the pedal/shoe to release and they hit the ground. The reason this happens is the pedal/shoe are not supposed to release with an upward force. The multi-angle release cleat allows for release with an upwards force....this is not a big deal for new riders who are just tooling around but can cause unexpected release when pedalling agressively such as climing a hill or on trail. If you already know to swing your heel outward then you should be good to go with the standard SPD cleat. Check your cleat bolts to make sure they are tight and make sure any lugs on the sole of your mt bike shoes are not getting in the way of proper function of the pedal.

-j
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Old 11-09-12, 11:42 AM
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^Everyone is entitled to their opinion!
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