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Can I change the bars on a Trek 930?

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Can I change the bars on a Trek 930?

Old 12-01-12, 03:28 PM
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jsdavis
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Can I change the bars on a Trek 930 to swept back bars?

I was gifted with a late 90s Trek 930. I'm not certain of the year but it has front suspension on it. Everything on the bike seems to work well.

I'm not sure what to do with the bike because I already have a decent commute bike and I don't really care for suspension bike in the city. I already know I'm not going mountain biking. Anyhow, I had my dad take a spin around the block on it since he's been asking about bikes. He complained that his back hurt because he had to lean over so much.

My dad asked me to turn the stem around so that it points towards the seat rather than the front...I don't think this is a good idea at all. Anyhow, what I started thinking was to get some bars like Soma Sparrow instead so that it would bring the bars closer to the seat. Maybe a shorter stem too...I'm probably going to have a shop do this for me.

What is involved in changing out the bars and what should I know before I go ask? I'm guessing I might need new cables.

The other thing is whether or not this is a good idea to covert a mountain bike to an upright city bike.

Soma Sparrow bars: https://store.somafab.com/sosp490bar.html
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Old 12-01-12, 03:39 PM
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Measure the bars at the handlebar clamp with a caliper (probably 22.2 or 25.4), and that will let you know what size bar to find.
Don't rotate the stem backwards.
Also measure the bar itself to ensure compatability of the brake/shifter levers (probably 22.2mm)
Another option is a shorter stem with more rise, or a combo of shorter stem and swept bars.
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Old 12-01-12, 03:45 PM
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As long as uyou stay with the same basic style, ie upright vs. drop changing bars is very straightforward and simple. The key element is the fit at the stem. This is typically 1" (25.4mm) for a bike of your vintage, and the rest of the bar is 7/8" so things like levers and grips transfer without issues.

While you're at it, you can change stems to a shorter extension, maybe also with some rise. Depending on how and how much you wish to change the position, this may make more sense than changing the bars, or may be done at the same time you change bars.

When you order the new bars, order a set of grips. This will have you covered if yours don't come off without being cut off. Even if the existing grips are OK, they wear out or get cut pretty quickly, so the new ones will be needed soon enough.
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Old 12-01-12, 06:54 PM
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You might also look into riser bars if the current ones are flat. That would give you some extra height on the bars but keep the orientation of your hands the same if that is something you are worried about.
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Old 12-01-12, 06:56 PM
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Two suggestions:
1) Ensure that the frame is not too large for your father. You can mess around with components but it's going to be difficult to make a too-large frame comfortable.
2) If you think you may be needing to fiddle around to get the sizing right you might consider a stem with a removable face plate and/or an adjustable stem.
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Old 12-01-12, 07:20 PM
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"When you order the new bars, order a set of grips."
Ergon grips,such as the GP-3, -4 or -5 offer additional hand positions and clamp to the bars so that they can be easily adjusted or removed/replaced. https://www.ergon-bike.com/us/en/home#
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Old 12-01-12, 09:02 PM
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Originally Posted by jsdavis View Post
The other thing is whether or not this is a good idea to covert a mountain bike to an upright city bike.
YES! YES! A thousand times yes!
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Old 12-01-12, 09:15 PM
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Originally Posted by jsdavis View Post
The other thing is whether or not this is a good idea to covert a mountain bike to an upright city bike.
My commuter is built from a non-suspension mtn bike. A pair of fat slick tires and it's perfect for the lousy streets on my route. I also don't have to worry about sewer grates, gaps between concrete slabs, or potholes all of which comes handy this time of the year when I'm going home in the dark.

Yes, it's marginally slower than my road bike, but I think that's mainly the result of the upright posture's higher wind drag.
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Old 12-01-12, 09:20 PM
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You will need longer shifter and brake cables and housing when changing out to riser bars or swept back cruiser bars.
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Old 12-02-12, 03:33 AM
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At least, you have permission to try ..
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Old 12-02-12, 04:16 AM
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Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
YES! YES! A thousand times yes!
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
My commuter is built from a non-suspension mtn bike. A pair of fat slick tires and it's perfect for the lousy streets on my route. I also don't have to worry about sewer grates, gaps between concrete slabs, or potholes all of which comes handy this time of the year when I'm going home in the dark.

Yes, it's marginally slower than my road bike, but I think that's mainly the result of the upright posture's higher wind drag.
I actually would prefer it if the bike were rigid, but I can't complain about a free bike. I don't care too much about it and just want to put it into use on the cheap. The frame is 17" and there's plenty of clearance over the top tube. Bike already has 26x1.75 Forte Gotham so it's good tire-wise too. I'm not sure speed is a huge concern for my dad.

My commute bike is a essentially a rigid 29er with street tires (Marin Muirwoods 29er) so I know where your coming from. Just never considered putting swept back bars on something like this and how well the geometry would work out.
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Old 12-02-12, 04:29 AM
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Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
Two suggestions:
1) Ensure that the frame is not too large for your father. You can mess around with components but it's going to be difficult to make a too-large frame comfortable.
2) If you think you may be needing to fiddle around to get the sizing right you might consider a stem with a removable face plate and/or an adjustable stem.
I think the frame is spot on. With good leg extension, the saddle is maybe 1cm higher than the bars.

Originally Posted by adclark View Post
You might also look into riser bars if the current ones are flat. That would give you some extra height on the bars but keep the orientation of your hands the same if that is something you are worried about.
Actually when discussing the bike, I'm pretty sure my dad wants swept bars. He told me when he was growing up the bikes would have bars behind the steering axis which I think is why he asked for the stem to be turned around.
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Old 12-02-12, 10:17 AM
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Yeah, just get a short stem and some swept back bars of some sort. Probably change to a wider saddle of some sort. ANd a set of colour-matched fenders. You dad will love it.
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