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Recommend a truing stand?

Old 12-17-12, 07:53 PM
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Recommend a truing stand?

So I need something decent for a truing stand. This will be my first one, never attempted truing a wheel before...but doesn't seem to bad. Wouldnt think I need a professional stand or something... but want something that will work well.

Suggestions?
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Old 12-17-12, 08:28 PM
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Find the stiffest stand you can get for the amount you are willing to spend.

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Old 12-17-12, 08:32 PM
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I used to use my bike frame, flipped upside down. heh.
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Old 12-17-12, 08:40 PM
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I have a Minoura truing stand. This is it at Amazon. It sucks because it pivots at every point on the stand, making it hard to know what you are measuring against. That said, I've built a half dozen wheels with it and trued about double that. You can get it to work but it's a PITA. It's problematic because it functions well enough that I don't need another, but poorly enough that I don't want to use it.

Get something you will enjoy using. That could be anything (including a modified fork), but be sure that you are comfortable and happy with it. You will spend hours sitting at the stand. Some time spent thinking about this carefully will pay big dividends in the long run.
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Old 12-17-12, 08:45 PM
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When my buddy Rob gets tired of letting me use his, I'm going to buy this Park truing stand: https://www.amazon.com/Park-Professio...dp/B0030LBLAY/

It's expensive, but so nice to use. Don't forget that it's more expensive to cheap out, then upgrade to what you wanted all along.
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Old 12-17-12, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott
When my buddy Rob gets tired of letting me use his, I'm going to buy this Park truing stand: https://www.amazon.com/Park-Professio...dp/B0030LBLAY/

It's expensive, but so nice to use. Don't forget that it's more expensive to cheap out, then upgrade to what you wanted all along.
You are correct there... So - do I still need something to checking the dishing of the wheel as well with that stand?

Last edited by clones2; 12-18-12 at 07:39 AM.
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Old 12-17-12, 09:27 PM
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Originally Posted by clones2
You are correct there... So - do I still something to checking the dishing of the wheel as well with that stand?

Yes, you do.
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Old 12-17-12, 09:38 PM
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Originally Posted by clones2
You are correct there... So - do I still something to checking the dishing of the wheel as well with that stand?
You can dish a wheel accurately by reversing the wheel on the stand as many times as necessary while making spoke adjustments until the wheel is indexed the same either way.
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Old 12-17-12, 10:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Al1943
You can dish a wheel accurately by reversing the wheel on the stand as many times as necessary while making spoke adjustments until the wheel is indexed the same either way.
You guys beat me to it, but yeah -- unless you intend to build off-center wheels, you can just flip it around on the stand.
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Old 12-17-12, 10:48 PM
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I'll give you the same type of advice i give frame building newbies that talk about which jig to get. Do some truing first with what you've got, a bike. Brake pads placed close to the rim, pieces of masking tape flapped over and stuck to the inside of the frame or a nail held with a rubber band are all easy indicators. A truing stand does nothing but make seeing the rim easier. it's the focus (and skill) of the hand weilding the wrench that counts.

After you've played with truing yoyr wheel on a bike then go to your LBS and ask if you can play with your wheel in their truing stand for a couple of minutes. then you'll have had some understanding to what you need and can decide what you want.

There is almost no resale market for cheap truing stands. Good ones are sought after by those who have learned why they're nice. Andy.
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Old 12-17-12, 11:18 PM
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Look always at your local Craigslist. I bought a brand new Park TS-2 for peanuts from a guy who had gotten it as a gift but was no longer into cycling b/cos he'd hurt his back.
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Old 12-17-12, 11:51 PM
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Why not go all out and buy this beauty? Will only set you back a couple g's.



https://www.pklie.de/truing_stand.html
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Old 12-18-12, 05:14 AM
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^^ drool...
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Old 12-18-12, 05:57 AM
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I have this Spin Doctor truing stand.

I've never used the Park Tools stands. I'm sure they are better, but I can get the wheel very true with this one. If your budget is tight, this stand and a Park TM-1 tension meter will be good enough for occasional wheel building and truing.

Tension meter
For a newbie wheel builder, the tension meter is really helpful. It's fairly easy to get spokes to have similar tension, but hard for a new builder to determine how far to tighten the spokes.

I'd want a tension meter even for truing a wheel, not just building one. Wheels can have uneven tension from the factory. And eventually you'll want to replace a rim or build a wheel from scratch.

Truing stand
Each of the two feelers can be moved independently. I decide which side has the most rise, fix that, then work on the other side. It's easy to slide the feeler in just enough to barely scrape on the tallest bumps on the brake track.

The two arms that hold the wheel axle are geared together, so they slide inwards together. For centering, it's pretty accurate and repeatable, better than I expected.

I've been meaning to get a dishing tool, but I just use the flat gauge at the bottom of the Spin Doctor stand, and two pieces of masking tape. I flip the wheel to see how far off center the rim is, then put the tape on the gauge where I want the rim to end up.

Now, years later, I'm not on a bike budget. I'll buy any tool or bike accessory that I think would be useful. But I don't feel any need to upgrade this truing stand.


One more tool for wheel building: I made a nipple install tool from an old spoke. I folded the spoke a few times to make a handle, wrapped with tape. The nipple can be threaded on the tool from the slot side. It's placed into the rim hole easily Turn the nipple with the tool to thread it onto it's spoke.


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Old 12-18-12, 06:45 AM
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Originally Posted by clones2
So I need something decent for a truing stand. This will be my first one, never attempted truing a wheel before...but doesn't seem to bad. Wouldnt think I need a professional stand or something... but want something that will work well.

Suggestions?
For your first experiment at this you can just use your bike. Flip the bike over and set the brakes to barely rub in spots and keep working on the wheel to eliminate rub. Move the brakes in closer and repeat. You will either get frustrated and decide to let a LBS do this next time, or you will find the project rewarding enough that you want to do a lot more wheels, in which case a dedicated stand could prove convenient.

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Old 12-18-12, 07:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Don in Austin
For your first experiment at this you can just use your bike. Flip the bike over and set the brakes to barely rub in spots and keep working on the wheel to eliminate rub. Move the brakes in closer and repeat. You will either get frustrated and decide to let a LBS do this next time, or you will find the project rewarding enough that you want to do a lot more wheels, in which case a dedicated stand could prove convenient.

Don in Austin
Great info in here. Thanks a lot. I think when I decide to get the stand, I'll get something decent like the Park Tool stuff. I trust the guy that built my custom wheels, so some minor truing the first year or so I should be ok with, using the bike and brake pads for truing etc... But I'm sure I would like to get the stand and spoke tension gauge after I've put a couple thousand miles on the tires and have trued them a couple times.
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Old 12-18-12, 08:32 AM
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Originally Posted by clones2
Great info in here. Thanks a lot. I think when I decide to get the stand, I'll get something decent like the Park Tool stuff. I trust the guy that built my custom wheels, so some minor truing the first year or so I should be ok with, using the bike and brake pads for truing etc... But I'm sure I would like to get the stand and spoke tension gauge after I've put a couple thousand miles on the tires and have trued them a couple times.
FWIW, if you got custom wheels built locally, the builder should have a warranty policy in place for truing. You should just be able to drop them by without a problem. Unless you do something stupid in terms of riding (hopping curbs, potholes, riding a road bike through Masa Back), the builder will likely true them for free, and to be honest, they shouldn't need it in the first year.
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Old 12-18-12, 11:38 AM
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I have a "Spin Doctor" truing stand that I bought from PBS a couple of years ago for something like 60 bucks and it works good enough for building a few wheels a year at home. It's really a re-labled Minoura stand, so you save a bit more money than going with a Minoura branded item but there's one thing that I wish they included with the stand that the Minoura branded stands come with. It's the centering "T" tool that gets you started with the feeler gauges close to center so you do not have to flip the wheel on the stand as much during the wheel build to maintain centering.
I still think that the Spin Doctor is a good buy anyway after using it to build up a few wheelsets and re-truing older ones I had in the last couple of years with no real problems......Just don't let it get banged around so the joints and other parts do not loosen up on it.
Yes, you can spend a lot more for a stand that could save you a little bit more time and effort per wheel build (Like maybe the beautiful machined billet aluminum DT stand I saw last year at one of my LBS's for a something like a whopping $2.7K!), but if you don't really plan on building a few hundred wheelsets a year, I don't think it's really worth going that far with a truing stand unless you have all that dosh just burning in your pocket, I guess....

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Old 12-18-12, 11:53 AM
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I would really like to have a Part stand, but when a "Spin Doctor" was offered for $20, I couldn't turn it down. I was using an old Raleigh front fork with Weinmann side pull brake stuck in a wood block about 10x10x6 that was a pain to use. I used a the cable shield adjustment on the brake to "clamp" the brake calipers. Instead of using brake pads, I bolted a small 90 degree shelf bracket in place. For radial adjustment, I bolted a long piece of very thin sheet metal piece to the brake bolt (bend to adjust). Talk about a kludge, but it worked except for centering! Bending the forks randomly and repeatedly between 100, 120, 126 and 130 was a pain.
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Old 12-19-12, 01:49 PM
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Make one,it's simple and cheap....use an old fork:

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Old 12-19-12, 05:41 PM
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Roger Musson's Professional Guide to Wheel Building includes plans for a home built stand and dishing gauge. I've built several wheels with mine and find it comperable to the Park stands I use at the Co-op. I got carried away with mine and built it out of teak scraps with brass accents, 8 coats of varnish and classy black knobs. The dishing gauge is a beautiful curved piece of oiled ash....the set up brings me pleasure and motivates a bit more care in my work.
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Old 12-20-12, 12:27 AM
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The "old fork" approach only helps you true or build front wheels, right? I guess you could do a rear by fastening it on the outside, only 1 dropout used, but that seems shaky.

I have a Park TS2.2. Yes it was spendy but paid for itself in 2.5 wheelsets, it will last forever, and whenever I'm done with wheels it will fetch $100 in a day on Craigslist.
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Old 12-20-12, 12:48 AM
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I trued wheels for years using a Park TS-2. I never had one of my own and went years without a stand. Finally bought a TS-2.2, which I don't like as well, but the 29'er capacity is nice.
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Old 12-20-12, 12:57 AM
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Originally Posted by clones2
So I need something decent for a truing stand. This will be my first one, never attempted truing a wheel before...but doesn't seem to bad. Wouldnt think I need a professional stand or something... but want something that will work well.

Suggestions?
A Park TS-2 (or 2.2) is probably the best you can buy and use. It's a very nice piece of equipment. If, on the other hand, funds are limited stands like the Minoura that TimmyT linked to are good. I've used one like this Pyramid for many years before I got my Park. It's a good stand and, in my opinion, it's a bit better than the Minoura. It's stiffer and a little more stable.
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Old 12-20-12, 05:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Rubato
Roger Musson's Professional Guide to Wheel Building includes plans for a home built stand and dishing gauge. I've built several wheels with mine and find it comperable to the Park stands I use at the Co-op. I got carried away with mine and built it out of teak scraps with brass accents, 8 coats of varnish and classy black knobs. The dishing gauge is a beautiful curved piece of oiled ash....the set up brings me pleasure and motivates a bit more care in my work.
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