Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Well, crap. Is my bike toast?

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Well, crap. Is my bike toast?

Old 01-11-13, 06:05 PM
  #1  
ollin
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ollin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Guadalajara, México.
Posts: 53
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well, crap. Is my bike toast?

Riding back home when I look down to find this:


Any options besides throwing it away?

2008ish Trek 7.3FX, I weigh 110kg(220lb), well within limits. I might have converted it to drops and did about 2000km of loaded touring and maybe 8000km of city riding. Doesn't seem to be an unusual amount of use to me :/ but i got it second hand so no warranty.

This is how tall i set the seat post:



there still was 6cm(2.4in) before the minimum insert mark!

Is this goodbye?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
20130111-IMG_0001-1.jpg (95.9 KB, 322 views)
File Type: jpg
20130111-IMG_0011-1.jpg (97.3 KB, 266 views)
File Type: jpg
20121223-DSC00878-1.jpg (107.7 KB, 260 views)
ollin is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 06:08 PM
  #2  
aramis
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Santa Cruz, Ca
Posts: 427
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Worst case you can just swap everything over to another frame. Aluminum frames are pretty cheap these days.
aramis is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 06:12 PM
  #3  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 11,660

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1734 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 32 Posts
I'd still approach the Trek dealer. Sometimes companies will extend a crash replacement discount. Andy.
Andrew R Stewart is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 06:27 PM
  #4  
jmccain
Senior Member
 
jmccain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 597

Bikes: Kvale, Peugeot, Cervelo, Bridgestone

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ollin View Post
I might have converted it to drops
Looking at the photos, I have to strongly agree that you might have.
jmccain is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 06:50 PM
  #5  
ollin
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ollin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Guadalajara, México.
Posts: 53
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jmccain View Post
Looking at the photos, I have to strongly agree that you might have.
OK, I did! I couldn't stop myself!

Also... maybe this is the signal for me to go cromoli
ollin is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 07:03 PM
  #6  
hueyhoolihan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Above ground, Walnut Creek, Ca
Posts: 6,689

Bikes: 8 ss bikes, 1 5-speed touring bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
it looks like that crack goes all the way around. if so, that chunk of metal above the seat cluster is just for show anyway. so just cut it off and reassemble. or not, it looks like that seat cluster needs a standalone seat clamp and there may not be enough room for it.

this may have been caused by a seat post that was not inserted far enough into the top tube...

Last edited by hueyhoolihan; 01-11-13 at 07:06 PM.
hueyhoolihan is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 07:04 PM
  #7  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,049

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4342 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
If that's a crack in the seat tube above the Top tube weld,your frame is golden brown, but may not be toast yet.

First of all, understand what is causing it, which is excess stress from an unsupported seat post. The minimum insetion mark on the pot relates to the posts requirements. However, there's a second requirement that the post extend to about 1" below the top tube. On a frame with a design like yours this may mean that the minimum insertionis deeper than the mark indicates.

Also, an undersized post can cause a similar problem by rocking within the tube. If all is right, the post fully supports the seat tube where yours is cracked.

If it isn't cracked all the way around, you might extend the life with a longer, better fitted post, however the crack will probably continue to grow. If you're willing to sacrifice a post to save the frame, and you have no plans to ever adjust the saddle height, you can get a longer seat post and bond it in place with epoxy, or an anaerobic (loctite) adhesive. Once a strong post is bonded in it will hold the frame together through the cracked area.

Given your weight, it may not be a forever repair, but if done right will last a long time.

If you replace the frame, consider a careful fit for the tallest frame you can manage properly. This will shorten the unsupported post reducing stress at the base. Also a frame design with a minimum extension of the seat tube above the joint will prevent this kind of damage.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 07:07 PM
  #8  
davidad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 5,822
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 302 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Get a Surly Long Haul Trucker frame and fork and put your components on it.
davidad is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 07:11 PM
  #9  
99Klein 
Senior Member
 
99Klein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Lincoln Nebraska
Posts: 1,089

Bikes: 99 Klein Quantum, 2012 Cannondale CAAD10 5, Specialized Tarmac Comp, Foundry Thresher, Fuji Sportif

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 98 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Giant warrantied some for me. Started at the weld.
99Klein is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 07:15 PM
  #10  
chriskmurray
Senior Member
 
chriskmurray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Colorado Springs
Posts: 1,134

Bikes: Borealis Echo, Ground Up Designs Ti Cross bike, Xtracycle, GT mod trials bike, pixie race machine

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If you bought the bike new before doing anything crazy go to a trek dealer and try and get them to warranty the frame for you. Trek is usually good about standing behind their products and it is not fair to assume the end user will realize their seatpost is not far enough into the frame if they are not above the min insertion line although what FB say's is spot on. Hopefully they will replace the frame for free and try to find a longer post to offer more support, especially since you need a setback post which would put a little more force on the seat tube.
chriskmurray is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 07:19 PM
  #11  
escarpment
Senior Member
 
escarpment's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: chicago
Posts: 781

Bikes: cannondale crit 3.0, specialized allez, old giant mtb/hybrid

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
3 options as I see it.


1) Contact trek, if you are original owner and can prove it

2) Buy a new Frame

3) Get a longer seatpost and do the loctite. The crack is not at a critical juncture in the frame as it is above the weld. A seatpost extending far enough downward will keep the frame together.
escarpment is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 07:26 PM
  #12  
pierce
S'Cruzer
 
pierce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: 122W 37N
Posts: 2,341

Bikes: too many

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
ya know, I saw somewhere on the Specialized webpile where they said most of their bikes were rated for max 200 lb riders. just saying... (I'm 210, down from 230).
pierce is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 07:33 PM
  #13  
mrt2you
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: new berlin wi
Posts: 172

Bikes: trek 720 multitrack hybred, 92 trek 2300, 2010 specialized roubaix, 2014 specialized roubaix

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by chriskmurray View Post
If you bought the bike new before doing anything crazy go to a trek dealer and try and get them to warranty the frame for you. Trek is usually good about standing behind their products and it is not fair to assume the end user will realize their seatpost is not far enough into the frame if they are not above the min insertion line although what FB say's is spot on. Hopefully they will replace the frame for free and try to find a longer post to offer more support, especially since you need a setback post which would put a little more force on the seat tube.
i agree see your trek dealer.
if you are the original owner it should have a lifetime free replacement warranty.
lots of clydes have broken there frames and gotten free replacements.
someone in the 50+ threads broke his fork steer tube on a 7.6 fx and trek replaced the entire bike.
mrt2you is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 07:35 PM
  #14  
mtbikerinpa
Shimano Certified
 
mtbikerinpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: PA
Posts: 1,840

Bikes: 92 Giant Sedona ATX Custom

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Looks like a prime candidate for a low temperature Alumi-braze or similar process(like HTS-2000) which can be used with a propane or mapp torch. For that juncture I do not think it would pose any risk if done properly in combination with a longer, tight fitting post.
mtbikerinpa is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 08:01 PM
  #15  
LarDasse74
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Grid Reference, SK
Posts: 3,768

Bikes: I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I believe that frame is fornicated,

Call the Trek dealer and see what they can offer, but after riding 10000 km on a used bike, don't get your hopes up. They may offer you a discount on a new bike or frame, but you may be able to get a new or clearourt replacement frame from another manufacturer for cheaper.
LarDasse74 is offline  
Old 01-11-13, 08:03 PM
  #16  
Airburst
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: England, currently dividing my time between university in Guildford and home just outside Reading
Posts: 1,921

Bikes: Too many to list here!

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mtbikerinpa View Post
Looks like a prime candidate for a low temperature Alumi-braze or similar process(like HTS-2000) which can be used with a propane or mapp torch. For that juncture I do not think it would pose any risk if done properly in combination with a longer, tight fitting post.
How low is "low temperature"? Anything using any kind of flame would have me worried about having to have the heat treatment on the frame redone to avoid weakening the alloy.
Airburst is offline  
Old 01-12-13, 12:04 AM
  #17  
ollin
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ollin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Guadalajara, México.
Posts: 53
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm using the original bontrager seat post that came with the bike, i'm possitive it's the correct size, 27.2mm. I also checked for weight limitations before buying it from the guy; this is what the website says:

  • Max rider weight of 300lbs:
  • All other bikes, including hybrids, urban, commuter, fitness, Ride+ electric assist, cyclocross, and all mountain bikes.
Things are sort of different here, most warranties will be honored for one or two years regardless of the stated duration (you will be blamed for any problems that occur after that period), dealers are not very commited to the brand; trek dealers here always deal other brands and most definitely will not honor the warranty if i'm not the original owner, which i'm not. So, that's pretty much out of the question.

Quite frankly i don't think i'll ever be riding this frame with confidence again; failure might not result in catastrophe, but i'd rather not risk it; i think i'll take the advice from FBinNY, davidad and aramis and just move all my components to a new frame that fits my height better so the weight doesn't cause so much stress on the seatpost (AND SHED SOME POUNDS! do I hear you say? hehe)

thank you all for your opinions!
ollin is offline  
Old 01-12-13, 12:59 AM
  #18  
bargainguy
Senior Member
 
bargainguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Trekland
Posts: 1,738
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 302 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 14 Posts
Ollin already stated he bought the Trek secondhand. I don't think they'd honor any warranty here, but I suppose it's worth a shot.

Your original post said you weigh 110 kg. That's 242 lb. Maybe you meant 100 kg / 220 lb. You're still well under the 300 lb. stated limit, though.

A small voice is telling me that a drop bar conversion on an aluminum hybrid designed for hybrid bars might have resulted in you doing more pulling on the bars, thereby putting more stress on the seat tube above the top tube, especially if you hammer a lot and go up a lot of steep hills. If there wasn't enough seatpost in the seat tube as others have stated, this might be a contributing factor.

I don't know if there's ever a way of knowing where there were microcracks in the seat tube to begin with or whether drop bar + hammering caused this. Either way, I wish you the best of luck with your frame.
bargainguy is offline  
Old 01-12-13, 01:33 AM
  #19  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,928

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6836 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 215 Times in 179 Posts
I suspect you raised the seat post too far for its adequate inserted length..
you should have bought a longer seatpost.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 01-12-13, 04:55 AM
  #20  
Airburst
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: England, currently dividing my time between university in Guildford and home just outside Reading
Posts: 1,921

Bikes: Too many to list here!

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
I suspect you raised the seat post too far for its adequate inserted length..
you should have bought a longer seatpost.
OP already stated that the post was 6cm from the minimum insertion line... That's hardly too far.
Airburst is offline  
Old 01-12-13, 05:04 AM
  #21  
ultraman6970
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 7,859
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hope the guy has still some warranty in the frame because that thing is toasted, specially if its aluminum. Was steel it is fixable but probably cheaper to get a new frame or something.

Good luck with the new bike dude!
ultraman6970 is offline  
Old 01-12-13, 05:46 AM
  #22  
SortaGrey
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 589
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Another repair option... [?]... install a collar around that exposed tube area. Glue that securely.

Or.. weld it. [?].
SortaGrey is offline  
Old 01-12-13, 05:57 AM
  #23  
Airburst
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: England, currently dividing my time between university in Guildford and home just outside Reading
Posts: 1,921

Bikes: Too many to list here!

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by SortaGrey View Post

Or.. weld it. [?].
The frame would need to be re-heat-treated afterwards, to restore its strength in the heat-affected zone.
Airburst is offline  
Old 01-12-13, 06:13 AM
  #24  
SortaGrey
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 589
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Airburst View Post
The frame would need to be re-heat-treated afterwards, to restore its strength in the heat-affected zone.
It's a given then that all aluminum frames are heat treated?
SortaGrey is offline  
Old 01-12-13, 06:25 AM
  #25  
Airburst
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: England, currently dividing my time between university in Guildford and home just outside Reading
Posts: 1,921

Bikes: Too many to list here!

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by SortaGrey View Post
It's a given then that all aluminum frames are heat treated?
As far as I know, all welded aluminium frames are heat-treated after welding, as a significant amount of the strength of the aluminium alloy comes from the heat treatment.
Airburst is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.