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Trouble truing with bladed spokes

Old 02-20-13, 01:30 PM
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Trouble truing with bladed spokes

Any tips on how to keep a bladed spoke form twisting when Im trying to true a wheel. Do "spoke holders" work well? Any other tips?
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Old 02-20-13, 01:34 PM
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I just used a pair of small vise-grips. It seemed to work fine but I am wondering if there's a better solution.
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Old 02-20-13, 02:25 PM
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Get a [synthetic] wine cork, cut a slot in it. It doesn't take much to keep it from turning.
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Old 02-20-13, 02:51 PM
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Just overtighten and back off as necessary until the spoke is "straight" again, like you would regular spokes. Or am I missing something?
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Old 02-20-13, 03:15 PM
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Pff many ways to solve the problem... grab a :

Block of plastic.
A lego block.
A small block of wood
A tiny piece of pvc pipe
ETC

and dremel a slot so the spoke gets in there. The way it works is self explanatory IMO
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Old 02-20-13, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by clones2
Any tips on how to keep a bladed spoke form twisting when Im trying to true a wheel. Do "spoke holders" work well? Any other tips?
There are some pretty good ideas here. Don't forget, you can just hold the spoke with a pair of pliers.
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Old 02-20-13, 03:37 PM
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In the shop we have a little piece of aluminum wih a slot in the edge,

its something someone with a little effort could make.. saw a thin slot.

a 4" short 'crescent' wrench may do. doesnt have to be vise grip tight .. just a slip fit.
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Old 02-20-13, 05:13 PM
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It's way easier than keeping round spokes from twisting.
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Old 02-20-13, 05:16 PM
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Plastic tyre lever, hacksaw slot. 30 sec tool which doesn't affect the original function of the tool. Perfect.

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Old 02-20-13, 05:32 PM
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I used to use a plastic tire lever with a slot cut in it, but I recently picked up a Park tool like this.



Part # BSH-4 blade

Easily worth the 5 bucks or so.
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Old 02-20-13, 05:39 PM
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Thanks guys. Ill give it a try.
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Old 02-20-13, 08:06 PM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott
Just overtighten and back off as necessary until the spoke is "straight" again, like you would regular spokes. Or am I missing something?
I too thought this would work and ended up cold-working a bladed shimano spoke into a helix. You really need to use a spoke-holder of some kind to prevent the wind-up. The bonus though is that when using a spoke holder, bladed spokes get 0 windup and will not need any stress-relieving whatsoever.
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Old 02-20-13, 08:24 PM
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+1

One of the reasons bladed spokes are nice, they are a lot easier to hold than round spokes. If they weren't so darn expensive they'd be on all my wheels.
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Old 02-20-13, 08:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Looigi
It's way easier than keeping round spokes from twisting.
: D

(emphasis mine)
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Old 02-20-13, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by nhluhr
the bonus though is that when using a spoke holder, [straight pull] bladed spokes get 0 windup and will not need any stress-relieving whatsoever.
ftfy
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Old 02-20-13, 10:10 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob
a 4" short 'crescent' wrench may do. doesnt have to be vise grip tight .. just a slip fit.
That's what I do.
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Old 02-20-13, 10:20 PM
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Originally Posted by nhluhr
I too thought this would work and ended up cold-working a bladed shimano spoke into a helix. You really need to use a spoke-holder of some kind to prevent the wind-up. The bonus though is that when using a spoke holder, bladed spokes get 0 windup and will not need any stress-relieving whatsoever.
Stress relieving has nothing to do with windup. It is taking the parts of the spoke that are overstressed and raising the stresses past the yield point actually stress relieving the spokes.
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Old 02-20-13, 10:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Al1943
That's what I do.
Just be careful not to kink the spoe and shorten it's life.
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Old 02-20-13, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by nhluhr
I too thought this would work and ended up cold-working a bladed shimano spoke into a helix. You really need to use a spoke-holder of some kind to prevent the wind-up. The bonus though is that when using a spoke holder, bladed spokes get 0 windup and will not need any stress-relieving whatsoever.
Ah, gotcha. Thanks.
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Old 02-20-13, 11:22 PM
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Originally Posted by davidad
Stress relieving has nothing to do with windup. It is taking the parts of the spoke that are overstressed and raising the stresses past the yield point actually stress relieving the spokes.
Well it's cute that you think that but Musson, Schraner, and Brandt all discuss stress relieving in terms of both seating nipples/heads and also removing spoke wind-up.

And since this thread is not about building, but rather about truing, we're talking of nipples and heads that are already seated.
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Old 02-21-13, 12:03 AM
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Originally Posted by nhluhr
Well it's cute that you think that but Musson, Schraner, and Brandt all discuss stress relieving in terms of both seating nipples/heads and also removing spoke wind-up.
It's funny that you can be a jerk when you don't know what you're talking about. Avoiding windup is important, but totally different from stress relieving the spokes. Maybe you should take a materials class.

Below is a quote from Brandt in Sheldon Brown's wheelbuilding article explaining stress relieving, even though davidad has already done a good job of it.

"...After cold forming, steel always springs back a certain amount (spokes are entirely cold formed from wire). Spring-back occurs because part of the material exceeded its elastic limit and part did not. The disparate parts fight each other in tension and compression, so that when the spoke is tensioned, it adds to the tensile stress that can be, and often is, at yield.

"...When spokes are bent into place, they yield locally and addition of tension guarantees that these places remain at yield. Because metal at or near the yield stress has a short fatigue life, these stresses must be relieved to make spokes durable.

"...These peak stresses can be relieved by momentarily increasing spoke tension (and stress), so that the high stress points of the spoke yield and plastically deform with a permanent set. When the stress-relief force is relaxed, these areas cannot spring back, having, in effect, lost their memory, and drop to the average stress of the spoke."
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Old 02-21-13, 12:26 AM
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We keep one of these Twist Resist tools in the shop, it works with bladed and round spokes:



Mavic makes a cheap little plastic disc with slots of varying thickness, Mavic usually include this and a spoke tool with their Ksyrium wheel sets:



We must have 50 pairs of these in a box.
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Old 02-21-13, 02:40 AM
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Old 02-21-13, 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
We keep one of these Twist Resist tools in the shop, it works with bladed and round spokes:



Mavic makes a cheap little plastic disc with slots of varying thickness, Mavic usually include this and a spoke tool with their Ksyrium wheel sets:



We must have 50 pairs of these in a box.
Hey, I totally forgot I had one of those laying around in a bin on my workbench!
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