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Need help finding out my spoke size and length

Old 02-25-13, 01:06 AM
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Need help finding out my spoke size and length

I was riding my old early 90's Raleigh Technium Chill Mountain bike on a regular paved road today and one of my front rim spokes cut in half. I was not too far from home and made it home safely riding very slowly. Now I need to replace the lone broken spoke. I watched some YouTube vids on spoke replacing and waned to give it a try before taking it down to my LBS. I went on-line looking at various spoke calculator websites and could not find any specs on my front wheel hub.

The front rim I have is a ARAYA RM20 26" mountain Bike Aluminum rim. I found the specs for that on Sheldon Brown Spocalc excel spread sheet.
ERD 547.0
OSBmm 0.0
ISOmm 559

The hub is a Shimano Deore model HB-MT60. I cant find the specs for this anywhere on the web.

Wondering if anyone in this forum would know the answer or lead me to where I can find the answer. The broken spoke is bent near the hub and the other half is dangling from the spoke nipple.

Thanks, Maukaman.....
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Old 02-25-13, 01:42 AM
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Best you can do is to remove another spoke, from the same side of the same wheel and bring it with you to a bike shop, ask them to sell you one or two just like it, incl nipples. Buying a single standard spoke online wouldn't be cost effective.
If you insist, I still recommend that you start with removing a spoke. Hang it by the bent end over a ruler that's graded from the edge, then just check how far it will reach. That - in mm - is your spoke length.

Gauge/thickness, you really need a vernier caliper.
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Old 02-25-13, 02:29 AM
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Hub is likely d=38.00 and c=34.25

Therefore @36 hole your spoke length is probably 265.72mm (265 or 266 even should get the job done.)

Therefore @32 hole your spoke length is probably 268.00mm

=8-)

https://www.mrrabbit.net/wheelsbyflemingapplications.php

See the spreadsheet...

=8-)
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Old 02-25-13, 11:42 AM
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Thanks for the info guys. I'll call my LBS today and see if they carry my spoke size. I may just bring the rim down to see if it fits.

Maukaman.
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Old 02-25-13, 12:10 PM
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Here's an easy way to measure accurately. Measure along an existing spoke (start from inside the elbow) to the rim one of two ways.

1- eyeball or estimate the allowance for the height of the nipple, usually about 5-6mm for non-eyeletted rims, and 6-7mm if eyeletted.
2- for greater precision, measure to the outer edge of the rim. remove the tire, and gauge the drop to the top of the nipple using a pencil or piece of scrap wood as a gauge and laying a knife across the rim and scoring it. Measure the drop and subtract from the earlier measurement, and you have the precise desired spoke length.
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Old 02-25-13, 01:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Maukaman
Thanks for the info guys. I'll call my LBS today and see if they carry my spoke size. I may just bring the rim down to see if it fits.

Maukaman.
They usually just cut to size in the store.
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Old 02-25-13, 07:08 PM
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Thanks for all of the great tips. I ended up bringing my 2 broken pieces of spoke and the guy at my LBS used a spoke ruler and cut to the exact measurements like you are saying. I ended buying 3 in case I need to replace more down the line. I trued my bare wheel by flipping my bike upside down and using my cantilever brakes as my guide. Seems kind of easier this way as I can use a flat head scewdriver instead of the spoke wrench. I am ready to ride again. Thanks all.

Maukaman....
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Old 02-25-13, 07:12 PM
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If you were able to turn the spokes very easily with a screwdriver they may not be tight enough, which can cause spoke breakage. Probably would have been best had you brought the entire wheel in. Even if you end up doing it yourself they can advise you if the tension is poor, hub needs attention, etc.
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Old 02-26-13, 02:35 AM
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Originally Posted by cny-bikeman
If you were able to turn the spokes very easily with a screwdriver they may not be tight enough, which can cause spoke breakage.
+1

Sounds like an overall retension would be needed.
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Old 02-26-13, 09:10 AM
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Ziptie the 2 extra spokes to your chainstay and you'll have them when you need them.
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Old 02-26-13, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by kmv2
Ziptie the 2 extra spokes to your chainstay and you'll have them when you need them.
This only makes sense for long multi-day tours, and may be borderline if your riding takes you many hours from home. Otherwise you might as well ride home and deal with replacing spokes there.

BTW- While you might want spare spokes for a long tour, the right solution really lies in doing what's necessary to avoid breaking them in the first place. A decently built wheel can and will go thousands of miles without breaking a spoke.
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Old 02-26-13, 10:26 AM
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Be sure to bring the wheel to a good shop to recheck spoke tension before you re-use that wheel. Otherwise, you may lose more spokes due to fatigue. A motorist ran into my rear Matrix ISO 3 rim around 13K miles. Rim was bent, so I had to raise the spoke tension all around to compensate for two loose spokes on the non-drive side. Fast forward to today. Wheel has about 27K miles. Still riding with the two loose spokes. Rim is running +/-0.002", although tolerance will grow to +/-0.005" every 3K miles, requiring some tinkering with the spokes.
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Old 03-01-13, 04:51 PM
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My bike survived for 22 years with the same rim and spoke on them. This is the first time a spoke broke. After looking at the break area, it seems the stainless steel spoke cut on a spot that has a tiny rust mark. Really small but mayhave may eaten enough to weaken the spoke in that area.
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Old 03-01-13, 05:51 PM
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Stainless steel does not rust easily, and only the lower grades (including 302/304 often used in spokes) do so at all. Even with that the likely cause of the breakage is fatigue. In fact the fatigue could have made the spoke more subject to corrosion at that spot. The fact that the wheel lasted for 22 years is great, and is also an argument for fatigue being the cause. If you break 1-2 more spokes it's time to look at replacement or rebuild.

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Old 03-01-13, 06:27 PM
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The tiny rust mark was probably the fatigue spot. Just like a nick would.

Last edited by Bill Kapaun; 03-01-13 at 06:39 PM.
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Old 03-02-13, 07:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Maukaman
I was riding my old early 90's Raleigh Technium Chill Mountain bike on a regular paved road today and one of my front rim spokes cut in half.
What are you trying to accomplish?

If your objective is to get the bike back into riding condition, the cost effective solution is to replace the entire front wheel. That's an old bike and the rest of the spokes have the same age and wear factors as the one that just broke in half. Used front wheels, by the way, are cheap and easy to find. Rears, not so much.

If your goal is to learn about bike mechanics, then I agree the right thing is to try to fix what you have. Just plan on adding the price of a replacement spoke and nipple onto the cost of the new wheel that you're eventually going to have to buy.
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Old 03-04-13, 05:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
What are you trying to accomplish?

If your objective is to get the bike back into riding condition, the cost effective solution is to replace the entire front wheel. That's an old bike and the rest of the spokes have the same age and wear factors as the one that just broke in half. Used front wheels, by the way, are cheap and easy to find. Rears, not so much.

If your goal is to learn about bike mechanics, then I agree the right thing is to try to fix what you have. Just plan on adding the price of a replacement spoke and nipple onto the cost of the new wheel that you're eventually going to have to buy.
My entire bike even if 22 years old, still looks in great shape. My rim and spokes are not all rusty or even dirty. I would have to use my reading glasses to have seen the small rust pit on that spoke. I am slowly upgrading a few new parts on my bike to make riding more comfortable at current my older age. I am mainly using it for an exercise bike and currently ride about 10 miles or so 3 to 4 times a week. I added 2 new tires, new tubes, new comfortable seat, new adjustable stem, new handlebar. My new v brakes and new shifters and lever combo are on order awaiting delivery. I really don't care if I could find a Craigslist bike for cheaper or a used rim with good spokes for now. My bike is perfectly fine and I will change or replace as I need them or want them. I enjoy the new mods and this bike is a keeper to me. Kind of like an old car that has been under the car cover for over 15 years and brought back to life again. It's looking good as new, shifting perfectly with the older deore levers and derailleurs. My new tires are true and runs smooth. It may also have been a tiny branch that took out my spoke as there are scattered on the paved deserted road where I ride. I try as much as possible to avoid the branches or sticks on the ground. I am not trying to accomplish anything or have any goal in mind. I just enjoy learning how to fix, adjus, ride,set up etc and having fun in the process. When I want something done, I study, ask alot of questions, watch YouTube videos and just do it. This forum and most of the members here are very helpful and I am happy to be riding again. One day, I'll respoke both my wheels myself, but for now I can replace a broken spoke if neede as I bought some spares. So far so good and over 100 miles ridden since the rebirth of my Raleigh Chill. I lost 4 pounds in the last month from biking and hopefully another 15 more pounds within the year. Thanks for the tips and concerns.


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