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Minoura FT-1 wheel truing stand

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Minoura FT-1 wheel truing stand

Old 03-05-13, 11:47 PM
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bobonker
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Minoura FT-1 wheel truing stand

I picked up a Minoura FT-1 truing stand last year as an upgrade to the Spin Doctor one that I had been using from Performance Bike.

I've had a frustrating time with the FT-1 and am wondering if I'm doing something wrong?

Specifically, the "T" that is included to center the truing "arms" does not seem to get the arms centered properly.

Here's a pic of the stand with the "T" in place.


After performing this step (and ending up with a ~1mm gap on either side of the "T"), if I drop in a couple of known good front wheels, the truing arms that measure runout are not centered. I'll have a ~2mm gap on the left, but a ~6mm gap on the right. The "T" includes 2 small washers and 1 large one. One set of instructions (the main set) says to make sure that the big washer is "on the inside". The 2nd set says to not use the big washer at all. In either scenario, the arms do not end up centered.

Anyone else using this stand?

Thanks,
Bob

Last edited by bobonker; 03-06-13 at 01:06 AM.
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Old 03-06-13, 01:55 AM
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Anyone else using this stand?
No, but I have used out of whack truing stands for a long time,
just get a dish stick,
to double check that centering measurement, after flipping the wheel over often..

your picture is [?] now

Last edited by fietsbob; 11-10-13 at 01:17 PM.
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Old 03-06-13, 07:25 AM
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Wil Davis
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Originally Posted by bobonker View Post
Anyone else using this stand?
Yup, I've built dozens of wheels using mine, and have never had a problem. I think I've checked the "centering" of the gauge about once. I think the "centering" seems to only really matter if you're planning to set the dish of the wheel using the Minoura. I have a Park Tool WAG-3 Dishing gauge which I use for that purpose. The "Important Notes" in the instructions for the Minoura suggests that you use a wheel-centering gauge for setting the "dish" of the wheel.

HTH -

- Wil
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Old 03-06-13, 09:25 AM
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Not familiar with your stand, but can you "flip" the T stick over until you get the same reading both ways?

With my old Park TS-2, IF I'm "centered" for a front (100mm), it's off for a rear and vice-versa.
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Old 03-06-13, 11:16 AM
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Bill: The T produces the same result even if I flip it over. So, it appears to be centered. I'll play with it some more (ie, with the washers) and see if I can get to consistent start in the middle. Not a huge deal for truing a rim, but when building a new front wheel, I'd like to know that the rim will end up centered over the hub.

Thanks,
Bob
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Old 03-06-13, 11:47 AM
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Mine has this problem too, and I use a wheel dish gauge to check the dish after truing the wheel. Yes, it's a work-around solution that I wish wasn't needed, but it gets the job done without spending extra for a better truing stand.
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Old 03-06-13, 12:17 PM
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I think the Op's problem is believing that a truing stand is also a dishing tool. It's a rare truing stand that can stay centered. I never trust a truing stand for anything other then a suggestion of dish condition. For a proper check of dish you need a proper tool, that's why a dishing tool is made.

Now you can make one out of a flat table top and some blocks and business cards. Place the wheel flat on the table top. It will rock/roll around on it's axle. Place blocks of enough height to support the rim at two opposite points and so the axle is slightly above the table top. Using business cards or coins make a stack and place it under the axle so the stack just touches the axle lock nut. You now have what is in essence a dishing tool. Flip the wheel over and note the stack of cards/coins and whether it touches the lock nut.

I have used this when at friend's houses and we needed to check their wheel's centering. It's easy to carry a few spoke wrenches on your bike, a dishing tool is a bit less easy to carry... Andy.
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Old 03-06-13, 02:09 PM
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I use a Dishing tool. I have a Minoura stand and have found the only reliable way to dish the wheel is with the tool.
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Old 03-06-13, 02:19 PM
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I am not trying to use the stand as a dishing tool. The included instructions make it clear that it was NOT designed for that purpose.

However, they include the "T" to help calibrate things (ie, center the runout arms) and it's annoying that it doesn't seem to do the job. Why even include it? Hence, my thought that maybe it DOES do the job and that it's user error.

Thanks,
Bob
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Old 03-06-13, 03:20 PM
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Bob- The truing stand has no need to be centered for the indicator to be adjusted close to the rim. Only one side's indicator is needed for truing. Everything else is needless features and extra no value added. The inclusion of the centering tool is for marketing purposes actually. I'll bet when you bought the truing stand you said "cool, it even has a center Gage" (or something like that). Not that there's anything wrong with trying to keep the indicators fairly centered or including a center Gage with a stand. Just that it's not needed. You're methods aren't in error. Andy.
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Old 03-06-13, 04:50 PM
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I have used the park stand and while solid and well built, I will say that as stated by many others, there is no substitute for a dishing gauge.
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Old 11-10-13, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
I think the Op's problem is believing that a truing stand is also a dishing tool. It's a rare truing stand that can stay centered. I never trust a truing stand for anything other then a suggestion of dish condition. For a proper check of dish you need a proper tool, that's why a dishing tool is made.

Now you can make one out of a flat table top and some blocks and business cards. Place the wheel flat on the table top. It will rock/roll around on it's axle. Place blocks of enough height to support the rim at two opposite points and so the axle is slightly above the table top. Using business cards or coins make a stack and place it under the axle so the stack just touches the axle lock nut. You now have what is in essence a dishing tool. Flip the wheel over and note the stack of cards/coins and whether it touches the lock nut.

I have used this when at friend's houses and we needed to check their wheel's centering. It's easy to carry a few spoke wrenches on your bike, a dishing tool is a bit less easy to carry... Andy.

That's the best diy dishing tool I've ever heard of! Thanks!
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Old 11-10-13, 01:15 PM
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its just a reference point. brake pads on the bike are OK too .. [mid trip broken spoke compensation truing].

truing stands are convenient.. again, you might be good to get a 'dish stick' too. (mine is Minoura)

Though wheel flipping is often sufficient.

Last edited by fietsbob; 11-10-13 at 01:22 PM.
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Old 11-10-13, 07:27 PM
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I have their stand and the T doesn't help much. I use a dishing tool and use a true wheel to center the radial gauge.
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Old 11-11-13, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by itstom View Post
That's the best diy dishing tool I've ever heard of! Thanks!
FB suggested using soup cans for the blocks -- work great and usually available!
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Old 11-11-13, 09:47 AM
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I discovered by using Parks instructions, I was able to center my stand.
I'd picked it up used, and it was misaligned when I got it.
IF I centered it for a front, it would be off on the rear or off on the front with the rear centered.

Basically the concept was-
Adjust the threaded rod with both arms exactly vertical.
IF you don't, "trigonometry" causes the arm "ends" to move different amounts.
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Old 11-13-13, 04:37 PM
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I have the Minoura as well as the Park which I later upgraded to and I can tell you that there is no real substitute for a dishing gauge. While flipping the wheel back and forth will serve the purpose, the dishing tool gives a better measurement.
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