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How tight is too tight? (Question about tire bolts)

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How tight is too tight? (Question about tire bolts)

Old 03-08-13, 05:57 AM
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How tight is too tight? (Question about tire bolts)

Hello All,

Just a quick question. Today I adjusted the chain tension on my Tern P7i. When I was tightening the axle nuts, I wondered how tight is too tight?

I only have a wrench to work with, but is there some way of knowing how tight to make the nuts?

Thanks,

CLM

Last edited by Crazylegsmurphy; 03-08-13 at 06:24 AM.
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Old 03-08-13, 06:18 AM
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What on Earth's a tyre bolt? If you mean the axle nuts that hold your wheel on, the answer is "tight enough that they don't slip, but not so tight that the threads strip". There's no hard-and-fast torque measurement to use - a BMX with a 24-tooth front sprocket will have a lot more force trying to pull the wheel forward than a singlespeed road bike with a 42-tooth one, for instance, so the BMX would need more torque on the axle nuts than the road bike. How long is the spanner you're using?
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Old 03-08-13, 06:26 AM
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Sorry, my terminology is a bit off. Yes, I meant the axle nuts. (edited my post above)

I'm using an 8" wrench (spanner).
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Old 03-08-13, 06:51 AM
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An 8" wrench is unlikely to over tighten a rear axle nut unless you are putting an uncomfortable amount of pressure on your hand. Back in the "old days," when no bike shop had a torque wrench and it was not even possible to find torque specs anyway, I taught students in my mechanic course that a bolt or nut is properly tight when a large and sudden increase in resistance is felt.
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Old 03-08-13, 06:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Crazylegsmurphy
Sorry, my terminology is a bit off. Yes, I meant the axle nuts. (edited my post above)

I'm using an 8" wrench (spanner).
Not to worry, everyone has to learn the words from somewhere.

With an 8" spanner you should be able to get adequate torque on the nuts fairly easily, I was just worried you were using a mini-adjustable, like a 5" one or something, it's pretty hard to get enough torque on an axle nut with those (I've tried it).

Basically, if your wheel isn't slipping in the dropouts under the hardest pedalling you do, you should be alright.
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Old 03-08-13, 07:53 AM
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An eight inch wrench should be just fine. If the axel does slip tho readjust and apply more torque.
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Old 03-08-13, 08:28 AM
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Clicked on the thread to be educated on tire bolts...
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Old 03-08-13, 12:19 PM
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A couple of weeks back I was doing a new build which involved a crank with external bearings and other bits which required torque setting of 10 inch pounds through 400 inch pounds. I began to look for such an item. I found that I have 12 different classic T-wrenches in the shop, but none that went down that low or that had the finer grandularity. Also found none generally for sale either. A further searching found one item. Having now used it several times, I am very happy with it and it seems perfect for a BM to own and use. Note that it is USD45 w/ free 2-day shipping. That is pricey for a torque wrench in general. But it has what the others don't so recommend it.

Park Tool TW-2 Torque Wrench (3/8- Inch Drive, 0-600 inch Lbs)


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000NVAHMW/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1


/K
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Old 03-08-13, 12:29 PM
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A torque wrench with a maximum reading of 600 lb-in will not be sufficiently accurate a 10 lb-in to rely on for sensitive parts. As a rule analog measuring devices are most accurate between about 20% and 80% of their full scale reading. If you really need to deal with 10 lb-in values, you need a 1/4"-square drive torque wrench and these typically max at about 60 lb-in.
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Old 03-08-13, 12:29 PM
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To close on early post, these URLs should help sort the cats.

The last one is a conversion calculator that can be very helpful.

https://www.cncexpo.com/MetricBoltTorque.aspx


https://www.cncexpo.com/InchBoltTorque.aspx

https://www.cncexpo.com/TorqueConvertCalc.aspx
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Old 03-08-13, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider
A torque wrench with a maximum reading of 600 lb-in will not be sufficiently accurate a 10 lb-in to rely on for sensitive parts. As a rule analog measuring devices are most accurate between about 20% and 80% of their full scale reading. If you really need to deal with 10 lb-in values, you need a 1/4"-square drive torque wrench and these typically max at about 60 lb-in.
HR; Yes generally agree. I have a bunch of the little ones with max of 50 or 60 inch pounds. All of them have a minimum dial-in setting of 20 so gave up on those. Guys at Park said their product is pretty good/pretty accurate even at 10 inch ppounds. It did seemed to work well for the little bolts I had to tighten and the tool seemed to be "in its effective range" as I brought the bolts up from 0 to 10 inch pounds in increments. All else aside, I have now enough of them...the peg board is full.
/K
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