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Do I have this assembly right for my rear axle?

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Do I have this assembly right for my rear axle?

Old 05-17-13, 02:59 AM
  #1  
codyf13
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Do I have this assembly right for my rear axle?

Attachment below is photo I drew of how I have it right now.
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Last edited by codyf13; 05-17-13 at 03:02 AM.
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Old 05-17-13, 03:45 AM
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Don't put the spacers between the locknuts and the cones. Put them outside the locknuts. Otherwise, looks good.
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Old 05-17-13, 04:07 AM
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Originally Posted by cradom View Post
Don't put the spacers between the locknuts and the cones. Put them outside the locknuts. Otherwise, looks good.
I generally put them between the locknuts and cones, for two reasons. 1, it stops them moving around and making it hard to get the wheel into the frame and 2, the locknuts generally offer a larger surface area than the ends of the spacers, and that's the bit that's pressing against the dropout, so the larger the surface area, the less likely it is to damage or mar the dropout face. Plus locknuts are generally serrated to grip the dropout better.
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Old 05-17-13, 05:11 AM
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The spring is backwards.
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Old 05-17-13, 06:08 AM
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I don't even know what the spring dose. Also on that side with the spring the cone when I screw it down keeps going pass the ball bearings
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Old 05-17-13, 06:29 AM
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Originally Posted by cradom View Post
Don't put the spacers between the locknuts and the cones. Put them outside the locknuts. Otherwise, looks good.
This is wrong and Airburst gave the proper explanation. The spacers always go between the cones and the locknuts so the locknuts hold them in place and the locknuts usually have a ridged or grooved outer face to provide a better grip on the inside of the dropout faces.

As to the conical springs, (there should be one on each side) they are both installed with the narrow end of the cone facing inward. They aren't essential but they help center the quick release skewer when it is open and make wheel installation a bit easier.
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Old 05-17-13, 06:32 AM
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Originally Posted by codyf13 View Post
I don't even know what the spring does. Also on that side with the spring the cone when I screw it down keeps going past the ball bearings
There is supposed to be a spring on each side. they hold the Q/R skewer centered so that it's easier to mount the wheel. Should not be a great challenge to locate another one - none is better than one. The spacer/lockwasher absolutely should be between the cone and locknut, as noted above. If the cone is going past the ball bearings you have the wrong cone or the wrong size ball bearings. Finally, overhauling a hub is not just a matter of taking it apart and putting things back in the right order. It includes proper cleaning, inspection of parts, proper locking together and adjustment. There is plenty of guidance available - just Google overhaul rear hub - sheldonbrown.com and parktool.com being the best sources.
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Old 05-17-13, 08:15 AM
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One more note on the spring. If it doesn't go on with the small side facing in, the large end of the spring will go over the axel and interfere with the wheel mounting.

Dan
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Old 05-17-13, 08:18 AM
  #9  
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OP:

Are you doing a 5-speed, 6-speed or 7-speed setup? 120mm-122mm or 125mm-127mm setup?

=8-)

Info below...

[INFO]

A = Freewheel Stop to End-of-Locknut
B = Drive-Side-Flange-Center to End-of-Locknut
C = Outside-of-Locknut to Outside-of-Locknut

Regular 5 and 6 Speed

A = 29.00mm for 5 Speed
A = 35.00mm for 6 Speed
C = 120.00mm-122.00mm

Narrow 6 Speed, 7 Speed and 8 Speed

A = 31.00mm for Narrow 6 Speed
A = 36.00mm for Narrow 7 Speed
C = 125.00mm to 127.00mm

A = 40.50mm for Narrow 8 Speed
C = 130.00mm or 135.00mm

Most folks who want to build a classic 80s 126mm 6/7 Speed rear hub will simply go:

A = 36.00mm
B = 43.00mm to 44.00mm
C = 126.00mm to 127.00mm

IMPORTANT NOTE:

Get the freewheel side perfect as possible. That side must be correct.

Hold the hub and ruler "vertically" when reading your results to get a good read.

Use the non-drive side as your "buffer", "fudge" or "play loose" side in order to get "C". "C" doesn't have to be perfect. Most of my 6/7 Speed rears end up being 126.50mm when I'm done.

[END INFO]

=8-)
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Old 05-17-13, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by codyf13 View Post
Attachment below is photo I drew of how I have it right now.
As everyone else has said, you have it right except for the spring. I will add, however, don't take the freewheel side of the axle assembly apart if you can avoid it. When doing a hub overhaul, remove the cones, spacers and locknuts from the nondrive side and leave the driveside alone. It's not impossible to get the driveside assembly back together properly but it's more difficult.
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Old 05-17-13, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
As everyone else has said, you have it right except for the spring. I will add, however, don't take the freewheel side of the axle assembly apart if you can avoid it. When doing a hub overhaul, remove the cones, spacers and locknuts from the nondrive side and leave the driveside alone. It's not impossible to get the driveside assembly back together properly but it's more difficult.
+1 and this applies to any hub overhaul. Leave one side fully assembled and tight and remove only the other side. That assures you get the axle spaced properly on reassembly. The only exception would be if the cone on the assembled side is pitted or otherwise has to be replaced.
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Old 05-20-13, 10:45 AM
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Thanks for the help everyone, I've got it working now but I'm sure something else will go wrong very soon... ^_^
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