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Broken sram tourney derailleur, need better replacement!!

Old 06-22-13, 09:24 PM
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LeMansGTi
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Broken sram tourney derailleur, need better replacement!!

So, this is the second sram tourney derailleur to break on me, now I could spend 15 bucks for another one but I am looking for a better one. So, I am looking for one that would be a straight bolt in with no modifications. Any help would be great. Thanx
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Old 06-22-13, 09:29 PM
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Broken sram tourney derailleur, need better replacement!!
Originally Posted by LeMansGTi View Post
So, this is the second sram tourney derailleur to break on me, now I could spend 15 bucks for another one but I am looking for a better one. So, I am looking for one that would be a straight bolt in with no modifications. Any help would be great. Thanx
Can you post a photo?
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Old 06-22-13, 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork View Post
Broken sram tourney derailleur, need better replacement!!


Can you post a photo?


this is a pic of what it looks like when its not broken, haha

or did you want one of the broken pieces??
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Old 06-22-13, 10:07 PM
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My suggestion? Go this route...

It's a much better derailleur, and will probably last longer, too.
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Old 06-22-13, 10:16 PM
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First a minor point the Tourney derailleur is made by Shimano, not SRAM. I'm also wondering what you are doing to break your Tourney derailleur; JRA? As said above, you can pick a derailleur farther up the food chain like LX or SLX (the SLX is a little more heavy duty but costs more; like $80); but first see if you can avoid torturing your rear derailleurs..

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Old 06-22-13, 11:18 PM
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What happened to it?
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Old 06-23-13, 12:36 AM
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Originally Posted by jowilson View Post
What happened to it?
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Old 06-23-13, 12:51 AM
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I'm looking at a knobby tire, offroad fender and disc brake. Shimano Tourney is a groupset found on city bikes and mountain STYLED city bikes. Its NOT intended for off road use. Neither is Olivio nor Acera. Deore is the minimum you should be looking at.

Which won't necessarily mean the rest of the bike is any more suited to actual heavy duty off-road use.
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Old 06-23-13, 01:51 AM
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That's looking distinctly like a derailleur that had an encounter with the spokes on the rear wheel, are you sure you set the low-gear limit screw correctly when you fitted the first replacement?

Originally Posted by Burton View Post
Shimano Tourney is a groupset found on city bikes and mountain STYLED city bikes. Its NOT intended for off road use. Neither is Olivio nor Acera. Deore is the minimum you should be looking at.
I've done plenty of mountain biking with Acera and Alivio stuff with no trouble, what's different about Deore apart from less weight and more money?

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Old 06-23-13, 02:25 AM
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Smoother, tougher, stays put on the bug bumps better. Its not that much lighter. If you wqnt light go xtr, if you want the best for mtbing then its xt or slx. Big difference between deore and xt. Not as much between xt and xtr. At any rate acera etc will break on single track.
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Old 06-23-13, 02:43 AM
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Originally Posted by krobinson103 View Post
At any rate acera etc will break on single track.
I fail to see how, it's not like the derailleur takes any weight or anything. As I said, I've done plenty of singletrack riding with an Acera rear mech, without any issues.
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Old 06-23-13, 02:50 AM
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I killed 3 acera deraillers in 5 months on the road doing distance work. Switched to deore. Thing has done 7000km with zero problems. You get what you pay for.
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Old 06-23-13, 05:46 AM
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That looks to me like the result of a twig in the lower chain run. The dirty little truth is any mountain bike rear derailleur, even XTR, is just a twig away from such disaster. XTRs just cost a lot more to replace.
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Old 06-23-13, 07:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Airburst View Post
That's looking distinctly like a derailleur that had an encounter with the spokes on the rear wheel, are you sure you set the low-gear limit screw correctly when you fitted the first replacement?



I've done plenty of mountain biking with Acera and Alivio stuff with no trouble, what's different about Deore apart from less weight and more money?
Thats like stating you've driven your car offroad a number of times and it hasn't fallen apart yet so it must be designed for that. I didn't give you an opinion - I paraphrased EXACTLY whats in the dealer's literature that Shimano publishes every year and provides to dealers. Its nothing new - there's been a complete page detailing the suitability of each groupset for specific activities for years, and I've gone so far as to post the entire page in the MTB forum multiple times.

Let me say it again - Tourney, Altus, Acera, and Alivio are described as being suitable for city paved roads and smooth off road - period. If you want it spelt out more clearly than that - the specific warning posted on page 24 of the Trade Sales and Support Manual reads:
WARNING
Don't use a bike equipped with casual MTB/City Bike components on agressive off-road trails.
Alivio, Acera and Altus components are not developed for serious MTB riding, and there is a clear distinction from high end MTB components such as Deore and Saint groups in terms of purpose of use.
For instance, the use of a bike equipped with Alivio or Acera components for agressive riding may cause damage and possible injury.
Also, Tourney components are the MTB-look product group for casual city driving on paved roads. We will appreciate that you understand the product level and intended use of each product group and please give guidance to users on safe riding.
On your own bike you should feel free to do whatever you want. But information posted on these boards should be reasonable if its to be of any real use to anyone else. Obviously the OP has already experienced the results of using a city-bike RD off-road - suggesting it isn't really a problem will just guarantee a repeat performance, with possibly wheel damage next time.
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Old 06-23-13, 08:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Burton View Post
Thats like stating you've driven your car offroad a number of times and it hasn't fallen apart yet so it must be designed for that. I didn't give you an opinion - I paraphrased EXACTLY whats in the dealer's literature that Shimano publishes every year and provides to dealers. Its nothing new - there's been a complete page detailing the suitability of each groupset for specific activities for years, and I've gone so far as to post the entire page in the MTB forum multiple times.

Let me say it again - Tourney, Altus, Acera, and Alivio are described as being suitable for city paved roads and smooth off road - period. If you want it spelt out more clearly than that - the specific warning posted on page 24 of the Trade Sales and Support Manual reads:


On your own bike you should feel free to do whatever you want. But information posted on these boards should be reasonable if its to be of any real use to anyone else. Obviously the OP has already experienced the results of using a city-bike RD off-road - suggesting it isn't really a problem will just guarantee a repeat performance, with possibly wheel damage next time.

What precisely is the mode by which an Acera, Alivio or Tourney derailleur will fail if used offroad? Going into the spokes? Why is a low-end derailleur like the OP's Tourney or my Acera any more likely to do that than an expensive Deore one (or an XTR one for that matter)?

What would you say to cyclocross racers who use Shimano's proper road groupsets like Tiagra or Sora offroad, and advise other riders to do the same? Are they guilty of the same thing as me? I suspect so, as I doubt Shimano's literature recommends what they do.
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Old 06-23-13, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
That looks to me like the result of a twig in the lower chain run. The dirty little truth is any mountain bike rear derailleur, even XTR, is just a twig away from such disaster. XTRs just cost a lot more to replace.
Thats more of an opinion than a truth. I've personally chewed up and spit out lots of twigs with XT and Hone rear derailleurs with no issues. The ones too large to snap can be dislodged by pedaling backwards without stopping. The number one reason I've seen for rear derailleur damage on trails is rock impact. And in those conditions a short cage not only reduces risk, but is usually more in line with the use of a bashguard on front anyway.
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Old 06-23-13, 08:16 AM
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Originally Posted by onespeedbiker View Post
First a minor point the Tourney derailleur is made by Shimano, not SRAM. I'm also wondering what you are doing to break your Tourney derailleur; JRA? As said above, you can pick a derailleur farther up the food chain like LX or SLX (the SLX is a little more heavy duty but costs more; like $80); but first see if you can avoid torturing your rear derailleurs..


sorry about that mistake it is shimano. the one you have pictured here is that a straight bolt on replacement?
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Old 06-23-13, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Airburst View Post
That's looking distinctly like a derailleur that had an encounter with the spokes on the rear wheel, are you sure you set the low-gear limit screw correctly when you fitted the first replacement?



I've done plenty of mountain biking with Acera and Alivio stuff with no trouble, what's different about Deore apart from less weight and more money?
When I replaced it, I did not adjust any screws but I did ride the bike right after and for the rest of that summer without any issues. I guess it could of been a branch in there, I was riding down a long fast path with rocks and branches laying about.
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Old 06-23-13, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Airburst View Post
What precisely is the mode by which an Acera, Alivio or Tourney derailleur will fail if used offroad? Going into the spokes? Why is a low-end derailleur like the OP's Tourney or my Acera any more likely to do that than an expensive Deore one (or an XTR one for that matter)?

What would you say to cyclocross racers who use Shimano's proper road groupsets like Tiagra or Sora offroad, and advise other riders to do the same? Are they guilty of the same thing as me? I suspect so, as I doubt Shimano's literature recommends what they do.
Suggest you contact Shimano directly. Apparently you seem to feel the info they provide is just some attempt to sell products. My experience with them has been very different and Norh America cyclists aren't their major market for cycling products so there's no reason you should feel 'targeted'.

Using short cage road derailleurs off-road is a strategy several of the riders at Bromont use. Not because its bombproof - but because they're too cheap to put out for a Saint RD and would rather replace multiple derailleurs in a season using sonething less expensive. They're recreational riders - not professionals, and in every case I've seen myself the key word is 'short-cage'. Which tucks things up and reduces risks.
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Old 06-23-13, 08:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Burton View Post

Using short cage road derailleurs off-road is a strategy several of the riders at Bromont use. Not because its bombproof - but because they're too cheap to put out for a Saint RD and would rather replace multiple derailleurs in a season using sonething less expensive. They're recreational riders - not professionals, and in every case I've seen myself the key word is 'short-cage'. Which tucks things up and reduces risks.
I wasn't talking about downhill or freeride or whatever people do at Bromont, I was referring to cyclocross, where road kit is commonplace from what I've seen. If offroading on derailleurs designated as "road" or "city" parts caused serious issues and regularly broke bikes, cross riders would all use MTB parts.

Originally Posted by Burton View Post
Apparently you seem to feel the info they provide is just some attempt to sell products.
I think it's more likely to be for legal reasons, i.e. so they don't get sued when someone goes downhilling on a set of Tourney cranks and ends up in hospital.
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Old 06-23-13, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by LeMansGTi View Post
sorry about that mistake it is shimano. the one you have pictured here is that a straight bolt on replacement?
Yes. The difference between the SLX and Deore rear derailleurs are a matter of opinion; the shifters OTOH SLX is a huge improvement. Supposedly the Deore is trickel down technology from XT and the SLX is trickle down technology from Hone. I can't verify this from experience, but Shimano touts the strength of the SLX over the lower weight XT. However the SLX, LX and XT rear derailleurs appear to have identical designs so the devil is in the details; weight wise, lighter to heavier is XT 230gm, SLX 260gm, LX 280gm and Deore 300.
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Old 06-23-13, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by onespeedbiker View Post
Yes. The difference between the SLX and Deore rear derailleurs are a matter of opinion; the shifters OTOH SLX is a huge improvement. Supposedly the Deore is trickel down technology from XT and the SLX is trickle down technology from Hone. I can't verify this from experience, but Shimano touts the strength of the SLX over the lower weight XT. However the SLX, LX and XT rear derailleurs appear to have identical designs so the devil is in the details; weight wise, lighter to heavier is XT 230gm, SLX 260gm, LX 280gm and Deore 300.
thank you very much!!
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Old 06-23-13, 01:19 PM
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I was checking out the Alivio rear derailleur as a 9 speed road compatible unit recently, and must say it looks pretty nice. They classify it as a mountain group on shimano's website. Is it for "serious" mountain biking? I don't know, but I'd venture to say it would hold up just as well as some of the older LX/XT designs. It looks to be aluminum and steel construction, what else do you need? With that being said, if the LX derailleur on Jensonusa is the same price or cheaper, I'm going with that.
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Old 06-23-13, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by likebike23 View Post
I was checking out the Alivio rear derailleur as a 9 speed road compatible unit recently, and must say it looks pretty nice. They classify it as a mountain group on shimano's website. Is it for "serious" mountain biking? I don't know, but I'd venture to say it would hold up just as well as some of the older LX/XT designs. It looks to be aluminum and steel construction, what else do you need? With that being said, if the LX derailleur on Jensonusa is the same price or cheaper, I'm going with that.
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Old 06-23-13, 05:17 PM
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Originally Posted by onespeedbiker View Post
Yes. The difference between the SLX and Deore rear derailleurs are a matter of opinion; the shifters OTOH SLX is a huge improvement. Supposedly the Deore is trickel down technology from XT and the SLX is trickle down technology from Hone. I can't verify this from experience, but Shimano touts the strength of the SLX over the lower weight XT. However the SLX, LX and XT rear derailleurs appear to have identical designs so the devil is in the details; weight wise, lighter to heavier is XT 230gm, SLX 260gm, LX 280gm and Deore 300.
What's so funny about feeling that the Alivio rear derailleur is pretty nice? Your post above just proves my point. If Deore benefits from trickle down technology, then why wouldn't Alivio? Have you seen the Alivio RD-M430? Check it out:https://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/s...Id_165694#tab1 and https://www.shimano.com/publish/conte..._mountain.html In my post, I said I felt it would hold up as well as some of the older XT/LX designs. Compare the RD-M430 to the RD-M580:https://velospec.com/components/shimano/rdm580sgs. Was I that out of line? The current Alivio seems to compare pretty well to the 2005 Deore LX to me. Maybe you are laughing because the equipment in 2005 wouldn't allow mountain bikers to completely shred? Please enlighten me.
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