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Freewheel on a phil wood fixed hub?

Old 07-01-13, 02:56 PM
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Freewheel on a phil wood fixed hub?

This has been briefly discussed, but they don't address all of my concerns in this thread: https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...wood-fixed-hub

I am interested in installing a freewheel on a phil wood fixed hub. I called Phil Wood customer service and they said it will void the warranty and they would make no comment on the likelihood of a negative outcome because they do not recommend it...

1. Does anyone have first-hand experience with this? How was your experience?

2. Does anyone know of singlespeed freewheel that they would recommend that is perhaps narrower and better suited to grabbing onto the limited number of threads?

Thanks,

K
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Old 07-01-13, 03:36 PM
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I doubt you will face any problems with almost any freewheel.
Just make sure the threads on the freewheel are very close to the edge and do not have some flange-unthreaded area near the shoulder.

I've seen a couple of ghetto bikes with track hubs* and freewheel cassette 6-7speed.

*track hubs are not more "special" or expensive, some are just cheap ones used on velodromes in soviet Russia, cheap, heavy and reliable and with no performance whatsoever, so you might find ghetto bikes with track hubs in certain parts of the world.
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Old 07-01-13, 04:20 PM
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If you're talking about a single speed freewheel to replace a fixed sprocket there should be zero problem of any kind. I'm also very surprised that someone at Phil said it would void the warranty. The other way around fixed on a freewheel hub I could understand, but a freewheel doesn't impose any added strain on the hub and, in fact, is much easier on a hub than a fixed sprocket.

BTW- it might be that someone at Phil misunderstood, and thought you had in mind respacing for a multiple freewheel. then again, maybe I'm the one who doesn't understand your plans.
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Old 07-01-13, 04:35 PM
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there is just the inside half of the freewheel supported by the hub, dont over do the power input.
but the torque is transferred to the hub when it meets the shouder where you tighten it up to that face..
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Old 07-01-13, 04:45 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob
there is just the inside half of the freewheel supported by the hub, dont over do the power input.
but the torque is transferred to the hub when it meets the shoulder where you tighten it up to that face..
It is exactly the same number of threads engaged as a fixed sprocket would use, namely all the forward threads on the hub. Both types of sprockets would overhang and what engages air doesn't count either way.
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Old 07-01-13, 04:57 PM
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I won't tell PW & Co if you wont..
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Old 07-01-13, 05:34 PM
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A point of view is that the sprocket stand just about in air where the threads are ending, and will stress at bending effort as well, but the radial force is not too great to cause a problem, the leverage arm is very very short maybe one millimeter or so.

Another take on this is about common sizes of freewheels and fixed sprockets, while many track sprockets are 12-15T, most freewheels are 16+ T so you will get lower ratio that stresses more at torsion and stripping the threads, but still, nowadays with city "fixie" fad for tricks and stuff, you can even get 20+T fixed sprockets.

Anyhow, fixed gear (especially trick bikes with low ratio) will stress the threads and the hub far worse than any freewheel you may have. Just stay way from large distances from the threads to the actual cog to prevent bending stress - that is: "do not use multiple speeds freewheels" just to be on the safe side (doable with care and gentle actions on casual riding and preferably on a junk bike)

endpoint: IMHO no problem for singlespeed freewheel on track side. In fact all my flipflop hubs are fixed-fixed in the idea that if i want a freewheel i can put one but hadn't need it yet - i like the fixed side.
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