Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

My bike is coming apart :(

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

My bike is coming apart :(

Old 07-07-13, 04:27 PM
  #1  
Mony
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My bike is coming apart :(

Hello everybody!

This is my "made in USA" bike:
https://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...y#.UdncEW1IUdY
It is pretty much stock. I have been riding it for three years and it is finally starting to come apart.



It gets rough treatment. The reason I have fell for it to begin with is because unlike a brand new $250 Schwinn from Target that I destroyed going up a steep hill (derailleur sheered off) in the first week my Nishiki is stoic as hell. I bought it for $130. It felt solid. I figured -- if it lasts a year -- cake. Now I got so attached to it that I refuse to even look at anything else to replace it.

The bike rides anywhere from 25 to 50 miles on an average day five or six days out of the week. It gets thrown in cars, trucks, trunks. It goes up miles on steep hills. It sees rain, mud, trails, but mostly city streets. And it does all this while carrying 260+ pounds.

It has been having hard time shifting for couple of months signaling ether bent rear dropout, bent derailleur, stretched chain or tooth decay on the cassette (or all of the above?) -- and now it is even worse. Friend and I have tried fiddling with the derailleur to no avail. One of the grip shifters (for my front derailleur) has became a friction shifter about a year ago (works reasonably well). The bike fits me well, except for the handlebars which I'm thinking of replacing with mustache bar to try something different. My shoulders are quite wide and the usual road bike handle bars aren't wide enough for me to feel comfortable. I really like the easy gear combination on this bike: I can pedal for half an hour on a really steep grade (something I have to do at least twice a day) with out much struggle while others walk their bikes. Past month was extra hard on the bike. It was crammed in a cars and trunks just about every day and got stuff thrown on top. This bike hates being stowed away in cars and trunks. The plastic cover over the springs fell apart today on the front cantis. Just about every bolt I haven't touched in a month or two on the bike is loose. When I buy accessories that mount to the frame of the bike -- I often find that using Threadlock is a must or I loose things to the road after couple of days (gives you guys an idea what this bike experiences during the day).


I can put about $50/mo into this bike for the next six months. I'm an avid eBay shopper and I usually get what I am looking for a fraction of the cost.




What direction do you guys think I should go in with this bike?


Mony is offline  
Old 07-07-13, 09:04 PM
  #2  
AnkleWork
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Llano Estacado
Posts: 3,702

Bikes: old clunker

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 103 Times in 81 Posts
It's impossible to say without seeing and evaluating the whole bike. It would be bad if $250 into your refurbishment you found something irreparable.
But your stated budget shows the way forward: save up $300 and buy a very good used bike in six months.
AnkleWork is offline  
Old 07-07-13, 09:12 PM
  #3  
Bill Kapaun
Really Old Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 13,188

Bikes: 87 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1521 Post(s)
Liked 808 Times in 591 Posts
New shift cable.
Bill Kapaun is offline  
Old 07-07-13, 09:40 PM
  #4  
rekmeyata
Senior Member
 
rekmeyata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: NE Indiana
Posts: 8,774

Bikes: 2020 Masi Giramondo 700c; 2013 Lynskey Peloton; 1992 Giant Rincon; 1989 Dawles; 1985 Trek 660; 1985 Fuji Club; 1984 Schwinn Voyager; 1984 Miyata 612

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 856 Post(s)
Liked 111 Times in 98 Posts
If you're slamming the bike into trunks and backs of cars I would start with the simple stuff first that get's damaged doing that kind of stuff, the shift cable as Bill Kapaun mentioned. Next place to check is the chain, if the bike has a fair amount of miles on it before you bought it and are unsure how many miles on the chain then that may be the problem as also could be the rear gear cluster maybe worn.

Cables are inexpensive, as are chains, and even the clusters can be found relatively cheap. Probably if you replaced all three you would be out about $100 at the most from an LBS and probably a lot less on E-Bay.

I would try to save the bike first, spending $50 to $100 isn't bad at all.
rekmeyata is offline  
Old 07-07-13, 09:56 PM
  #5  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 23,256

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1142 Post(s)
Liked 686 Times in 481 Posts
Even a top of the line, well built bike, is not going to take to being crammed into trunks, stuff tossed on top of it, etc. Bikes are not really designed for that kind of abuse.

That being said, most stuff is fixable, and should not take $50 a month for six months to take care of it.
wrk101 is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 06:08 AM
  #6  
Myosmith
Lover of Old Chrome Moly
 
Myosmith's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: NW Minnesota
Posts: 2,949
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 143 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 16 Posts
Assuming that your frame/fork, headset and BB, and wheels are in decent condition here is an example of what you could accomplish for approx. $50/mo:

July: Alivio shifter brake lever combination, new cables and housings, new basic grips ($60 +/-) https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-ST-M41...livio+shifters

August: Alivio front and rear derailleurs ($50 +/-) https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-Alivio...vio+derailleur

September: Cassette and chain ($40 +/-) Might want to save up two months and replace at the same time as rear derailleur

October: Alivio crankset ($45 +/-) https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-FC-M43...livio+crankset

November: Alivio brakes ($25) https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-Alivio...=alivio+brakes

December: Ask for any bike bits still needed as Christmas gifts ($0)

Assuming you can do the work yourself, total investment of about $225 gives you new drivetrain, brakes and controls appropriate to the type and level of bike (entry level hybrid). I picked the Alivio components as they are dependable, inexpensive, entry level components that will serve you well if properly cared for. You might not need some of the items like the FD and crankset so you could end up spending a lot less. Of course, the alternative is to save the $225 and put it toward a different bike. Whatever the case you need to start taking better care of your ride.

NOTE: Don't anyone give me a hard time about Amazon vs. LBS. I'm all for supporting local LBSs and the links are just for pricing and illustration. The OP mentioned EBay so he is apparently not opposed to online purchases.

Last edited by Myosmith; 07-08-13 at 06:20 AM.
Myosmith is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 06:32 AM
  #7  
himespau 
Senior Member
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 12,905
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3434 Post(s)
Liked 2,183 Times in 1,291 Posts
If you are going to keep tossing it into trucks, etc., at the very least make sure you're putting it in there derailleur side up and not putting stuff on top of it.
himespau is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 07:05 AM
  #8  
rekmeyata
Senior Member
 
rekmeyata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: NE Indiana
Posts: 8,774

Bikes: 2020 Masi Giramondo 700c; 2013 Lynskey Peloton; 1992 Giant Rincon; 1989 Dawles; 1985 Trek 660; 1985 Fuji Club; 1984 Schwinn Voyager; 1984 Miyata 612

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 856 Post(s)
Liked 111 Times in 98 Posts
Originally Posted by Myosmith View Post
Assuming that your frame/fork, headset and BB, and wheels are in decent condition here is an example of what you could accomplish for approx. $50/mo:

July: Alivio shifter brake lever combination, new cables and housings, new basic grips ($60 +/-) https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-ST-M41...livio+shifters

August: Alivio front and rear derailleurs ($50 +/-) https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-Alivio...vio+derailleur

September: Cassette and chain ($40 +/-) Might want to save up two months and replace at the same time as rear derailleur

October: Alivio crankset ($45 +/-) https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-FC-M43...livio+crankset

November: Alivio brakes ($25) https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-Alivio...=alivio+brakes

December: Ask for any bike bits still needed as Christmas gifts ($0)

Assuming you can do the work yourself, total investment of about $225 gives you new drivetrain, brakes and controls appropriate to the type and level of bike (entry level hybrid). I picked the Alivio components as they are dependable, inexpensive, entry level components that will serve you well if properly cared for. You might not need some of the items like the FD and crankset so you could end up spending a lot less. Of course, the alternative is to save the $225 and put it toward a different bike. Whatever the case you need to start taking better care of your ride.

NOTE: Don't anyone give me a hard time about Amazon vs. LBS. I'm all for supporting local LBSs and the links are just for pricing and illustration. The OP mentioned EBay so he is apparently not opposed to online purchases.

The OP doesn't need to replace all that stuff, he only needs to replace that stuff if and when it's needed.
rekmeyata is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 07:51 AM
  #9  
Myosmith
Lover of Old Chrome Moly
 
Myosmith's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: NW Minnesota
Posts: 2,949
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 143 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 16 Posts
Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
The OP doesn't need to replace all that stuff, he only needs to replace that stuff if and when it's needed.
I don't recall saying that he did. In fact, I mentioned toward the end of my post that he may not need or want to replace everything listed. The OP did specifically mention problems with the rear derailleur and possibly chain and cassette needing replacement, a grip shifter going bad, and damage (at least cosmetic) to his brakes. In addition the bike has seen a lot of hard miles and has not received good care.

The OP also mentioned having $50 a month for six months to put into the bike. What I posted was an example of what could be accomplished within that budget if needed or desired. It is obviously up to the OP to determine what, when and in what order to do the repairs/upgrades.

Honestly, I'd have to look hard at putting much into this bike, but the OP seems very attached to it. I'd start with a new rear shift cable and housing, RD, and if needed the cassette and chain (have LBS check hanger alignment). After that I'd look at getting some better shifters (could get just shifters instead of shifter/brake lever combos if staying with canti brakes). Once the bike is safely functional, everything else is optional, but if he loves the bike and has the budget, that's his business.

Last edited by Myosmith; 07-08-13 at 08:17 AM.
Myosmith is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 08:40 AM
  #10  
cny-bikeman
Mechanic/Tourist
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Syracuse, NY
Posts: 7,510

Bikes: 2008 Novara Randonee - love it. Previous bikes:Motobecane Mirage, 1972 Moto Grand Jubilee (my fave), Jackson Rake 16, 1983 C'dale ST500.

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 482 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 10 Posts
I've never seen a Made in USA Nishiki (nor any other bike in decades) but that's beside the point.

To the point: One does not have to just throw a bike into a truck/car, and there's no need to pile stuff on top of it. Using just a modicum of care will save much in the long run. All the other issues you mention - miles, hills, rain, mud, etc. are met by many other riders and bikes. The key is regular maintenance, rather than allowing things to deteriorate for "a couple of months" or more. Anything you ignore will only get worse and more expensive, especially with the drive train, where one part can directly affect others.

Rather than fiddling with parts learn correct procedures for maintenance and repair and apply them regularly. A bike obeys the rules of physics and troubleshooting it is a logical process. There is no shortcut laundry list of what you should do with $50 per month. Start with Sheldonbrown.com, parktool.com/blog and Google to learn how to address each issue.

Finally, road bike bars evolved because they give the most efficient riding position and a variety of options. They also are available in wider widths than standard, so don't abandon them without considering other options.

Last edited by cny-bikeman; 07-08-13 at 01:29 PM.
cny-bikeman is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 09:38 AM
  #11  
Spld cyclist
Senior Member
 
Spld cyclist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Springfield, MA
Posts: 1,060

Bikes: 2012 Motobecane Fantom CXX, 2012 Motobecane Fantom CX, 1997 Bianchi Nyala, 200? Burley Rock 'n Roll

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I generally agree with the suggestions already made. I would add rebuilds to the hubs, headset, and bottom bracket (unless the bottom bracket is a sealed unit that you just run until it dies).

Cables, chains, and cassettes are so cheap that you should just buy them new. I would also change the shifter cable housings at the same time you replace the shifter cables.
Spld cyclist is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 11:11 AM
  #12  
Mony
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You guys are absolutely amazing! Thank you so, so much for all the detailed suggestions and cool tidbits such as an Italian paint job. Yesterday, while waiting for replies to this post, I had this crazy idea pop into my head:

What if! What if I can ask my LBS to patch up my bike to keep it running this season and spend the money of an internal gear system and brakes? I know I'm only getting nine gears at best, and I don't understand the gearing yet (e.g. I don't know what gearing I'm running o the bike because I can't find much info about the component set it came with), but if the gears are sufficiently low enough to get up the aforementioned hills it might be a wise investment especially considering that it is something that I can move onto my next bike. This way if I abuse the crap out of it it should be as robust as a fixed gear bike.

With that been said, I'm on my way to an LBS right this moment, and I'll get their opinion in the mix. I think my crank is good (although it was recalled for manufacturer defect a long time ago), I also think it is sealed. My headset hasn't given me any issues, but I thought of maybe pulling my stem up a bit to avoid carpal tunnel as my hands often get numb from the wrists being in a crap position. I will also work on readjusting my riding posture as per SB's directions. I think mustache bars might give me more options, and I thank you for the point that was made about wider downbars.

I'll let you guys know what LBS tells me today!


Thanks again, and again!





You guys rock!
Mony is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 12:00 PM
  #13  
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 8,688
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1073 Post(s)
Liked 289 Times in 216 Posts
Originally Posted by Mony View Post
What if! What if I can ask my LBS to patch up my bike to keep it running this season and spend the money of an internal gear system and brakes?
Keep in mind that bike parts are a lot more expensive than bikes. While it's entirely doable to get new wheels with internal gear, drum/roller brakes, maybe even a generator front hub - it'll cost you. To the point where buying a bike spec-ed that way can well be cheaper. Such a big overhaul is usually not cost effective unless there's something special about the frame, or if you can score the parts at bargain prices.

Originally Posted by Mony View Post
I know I'm only getting nine gears at best, and I don't understand the gearing yet (e.g. I don't know what gearing I'm running o the bike because I can't find much info about the component set it came with)
What is it that you want to understand?
Start with counting the teeth, that'll give you the ratios - assuming the bikepedia spec isn't enough.

Basically, on a triple you'll have a fair bit of overlap. Expect to have about 2/3 as many usefully different ratios as you have different combinations. So for a 3x6 bike, about 12 usefully different gears. Rule-of-thumb is smallest front= uphill. Middle front=flat. Big front= downhill, tailwinds.

Sheldon Brown has a good gear calculator that'll let you compare IGHs and external gear hubs.
dabac is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 12:04 PM
  #14  
bkaapcke
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3,268
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 117 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 24 Posts
When you finally get another bike, don't beat the snot out of it. Unless you want the same results. bk
bkaapcke is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 04:06 PM
  #15  
gyozadude
Senior Member
 
gyozadude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Sunnyvale, California
Posts: 1,180

Bikes: Bridgestone RB-1, 600, T700, MB-6 w/ Dirt Drops, MB-Zip, Bianchi Limited, Nashbar Hounder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
OP:

If you're located near a town or city with a Bike Co-op, you may be able to find the right parts to keep your bike maintained, and learn a little bit about how to service most parts of your bike and this can be a much lower-cost alternative to the prices charged at a retail LBS. Or you might want to
invest a little bit more in tools and learn maintenance for yourself. While I think that higher quality components do keep their adjustments for longer than lesser quality components, it doesn't mean that you can simply leave them alone. All bikes need maintenance and the more you ride, the more your bike will need maintenance, otherwise, it will fall apart. For some strange reason, I have fun working on my bikes, so I treat it as a hobby and get a lot of satisfaction getting my bikes back into great working condition. My budget isn't as tight as yours, but I recycle and patch old tubes and put them back into service, I recycle discarded rear brake and derailleur cables and use them for front brakes/derailleurs that have a shorter run. And once a week or so, I'll take my tri-allen wrench and go through and snug up most bolts just to prevent them from falling off mid-ride.
gyozadude is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 09:12 PM
  #16  
Mony
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
So I had few things done at the LBS:

Rear wheel trued
New front cantis and pads (generic) instaled
New derailleur installed
New shifter cables installed
New freewheel installed
New chain installed
Rear dropout straightened
Grip shifters adjusted

All for $80

Not bad, right?
Mony is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 09:15 PM
  #17  
Mony
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I do have a bike co-op and I plan checking them out in the near future. They have really strange business hours.
Mony is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 09:24 PM
  #18  
Mony
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I wouldn't even know what to do with a $1k+ bike. It would be too precious. I would put it in my living room and molest it every time I would walk by. Me precious!

So far my bike expenses for the last three years: $130 bike, wheels trued x2 $20, rear tire $40, today's visit $80. Two seventy 'aint bad for 18,000 miles!
Mony is offline  
Old 07-08-13, 11:43 PM
  #19  
Mony
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm trying to figure out how well the frame fits me. Wrist pain is getting quite annoying.

I used this calculator for measurement guidance:

https://www.ebikewarehouse.com/Tiemey...Calculator.htm


I averaged between cyclocross, road, touring (numbers were very close). Seat tube is 1.5" taller; bottom bracket drop is 1.5" shorter; top tube is 2" shorter; chain stay length is on the dot. I nave no idea what angles I have, but the seat tube angle should be between 72 & 73, head tube angle should be between 72 & 74, and top angle should be level. Again, I do not know what my angles are.

Seat Tube Length: +1.5"
Top Tube Length: -2"
Chainstay Length: 0
Bottom Bracket Drop: -1.5"
Seat Tube Angle: ???
Head Tube Angle: ???
Top Tube Angle: ???
Mony is offline  
Old 07-09-13, 05:57 AM
  #20  
cny-bikeman
Mechanic/Tourist
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Syracuse, NY
Posts: 7,510

Bikes: 2008 Novara Randonee - love it. Previous bikes:Motobecane Mirage, 1972 Moto Grand Jubilee (my fave), Jackson Rake 16, 1983 C'dale ST500.

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 482 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 10 Posts
It's not the frame causing the problem but rather your position on it. Start with the seat position, both height and fore-aft, then distance from seat to stem and stem height. Bars can be changed but not usually necessary - padding on the bars and cycling gloves can help, though.

LOTS of guidance (and disagreement) on seat position, but basically you should have a slight bend in your knee at the bottom of the stroke. Sometimes it helps to put your heel on the pedal and adjust so your leg is straight with hips level. Fore-aft is more difficult - Google bike seat KOPS. If the saddle is more forward you will lean too heavily on the bars, but if too far back you may have too long a reach to the bars or too much weight on the saddle. Bars can be adjusted for both height and reach with the stem - don't just make them taller to relieve pressure.

It's always best to get in-person assistance from someone familiar with bike fit and comfort (not necessary to spend big bucks, though - find someone in a bike club or similar).
cny-bikeman is offline  
Old 07-09-13, 11:14 AM
  #21  
3alarmer 
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 21,018

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 293 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23837 Post(s)
Liked 7,538 Times in 5,325 Posts
Originally Posted by Mony View Post
I do have a bike co-op and I plan checking them out in the near future. They have really strange business hours.

I help run the bike coop here where I live. Given your description of the general care and treatment of your bicycle, I won't say which one. Good luck.

Except for your description of hills in your riding, you sound like a guy who might benefit from a single speed setup.


There are few hills near me, so I feel safe for the moment....................
__________________
3alarmer is offline  
Old 07-09-13, 12:32 PM
  #22  
rekmeyata
Senior Member
 
rekmeyata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: NE Indiana
Posts: 8,774

Bikes: 2020 Masi Giramondo 700c; 2013 Lynskey Peloton; 1992 Giant Rincon; 1989 Dawles; 1985 Trek 660; 1985 Fuji Club; 1984 Schwinn Voyager; 1984 Miyata 612

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 856 Post(s)
Liked 111 Times in 98 Posts
Originally Posted by Mony View Post
So I had few things done at the LBS:

Rear wheel trued
New front cantis and pads (generic) instaled
New derailleur installed
New shifter cables installed
New freewheel installed
New chain installed
Rear dropout straightened
Grip shifters adjusted

All for $80

Not bad, right?
That's cheap actually for all that work. If I were to have that stuff done where I live it would cost me about $250! Just the cables, chain, and shifters adjusted with labor would have costed $120 today!!

And some of you wonder why I don't buy my crap at the local LBS's in town.

In fact, in case no one believes me, here is a copy of their rate board.

SERVICE MENU


Quick Tune $30.00
• A safety check with necessary adjustments to make
your bicycle shift, brake & be safe.


Service Special #2 starting at $120.00
• Cable & housing replacement for the derailleurs and brakes.
• Adjustments to the derailleurs, brakes, & bearings.
• Wheel truing.
• Cleaning & lubrication of the drivetrain.
• Tighten loose nuts & bolts.


Service Special #1 starting at $60.00
• A complete tune up.
• Adjustments to the derailleurs, brakes, & bearings.
• Wheel truing.
• Cleaning & lubrication of the chain.
• Tighten loose nuts & bolts.


Service Special #3 starting at $180.00
• A complete overhaul.
• Bearing overhaul of the hubs, headset, & bottom brackets.
• Cable & housing replacement for the derailleurs and brakes
• Cleaning & lubrication of the drivetrain.
• Thorough cleaning of the frame and fork.


• ALL SERVICES GUARANTEED FOR 30 DAYS.
• ALL SERVICES WILL BE PERFORMED FOR THE QUOTED PRICE.
• BICYCLES LEFT AFTER THIRTY (30) DAYS WILL BECOME PROPERTY OF
SUMMIT CITY BICYCLES & FITNESS.
• CLAIM TICKET REQUIRED FOR PICK UP OR A VALID ID WILL BE ACCEPTED
• ALL REPAIRS WILL BE CHARGED A $25.00 “SMALL PARTS CONTINGENCY”
TO COVER THE ADDITIONAL COSTS OF PARTS AND LABOR THAT MAY
ARISE. THIS PRE-APPROVAL SAVES YOU TIME AND WILL BE REMOVED IF
NOT NEEDED
rekmeyata is offline  
Old 07-09-13, 03:52 PM
  #23  
Turtle Speed
happy bike wishes
 
Turtle Speed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Mony View Post
So I had few things done at the LBS... All for $80
You got a heck of a lot of labor for 80 bucks. Assuming they know what they're doing, consider yourself lucky.

I'm probably going to get flamed for this, but I think one of the best investments you can make on a bike that is going to get its ass kicked is to put a rear derailer guard on it. The rear derailer hanger is possibly the most fragile part on a bike, and if it gets bent, your shifting will start to act majorly weird. Having the bike fall over on the right side, or even leaning the bike down on the right is sometimes enough to bend it. Throwing the bike in trunks and piling stuff on it can definitely do it.

If you can, always lay the bike down on its left side, so the rear derailer hanger isn't being pressed on by the weight of the bike, and try not to pile stuff on that part of the bike. Do that, and get a derailer guard for good measure, and it might spell the best $5-10 you invest in the bike.

A lot of people would never use a guard, because they add a nominal amount of weight, aren't always necessary, "look dorky," etc., but you're so heavy-duty with your bike that I think it is worth strong consideration.
Turtle Speed is offline  
Old 07-09-13, 07:58 PM
  #24  
cyclist2000
Senior Member
 
cyclist2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Up
Posts: 4,640

Bikes: Masi, Giant TCR, Eisentraut (retired), Jamis Aurora Elite, Zullo, Cannondale, 84 & 93 Stumpjumpers, Waterford, Tern D8, Bianchi, Gunner Roadie, Serotta, and looking for a Brompton M6R or T-line

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 297 Post(s)
Liked 1,899 Times in 557 Posts
Originally Posted by Mony View Post
I wouldn't even know what to do with a $1k+ bike.
Hopefully you would buy some pedals and ride it.
cyclist2000 is offline  
Old 07-13-13, 10:34 PM
  #25  
Wordbiker
Pwnerer
 
Wordbiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 2,909
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Mony View Post
What direction do you guys think I should go in with this bike?
Forward.

Other than that I think you should buy locally and support the economy you live in, buy from an LBS that carries brands that contribute to cycling advocacy, volunteers their time to promote a cycling friendly atmosphere within your community so that you can ride in relative safety and supports cool people that love the same sport that you do so it continues into future generations rather than stagnates into an undervalued commodity item.
__________________
Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
Ski, bike and wish I was gay.
Wordbiker is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.