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Chain replacement

Old 07-13-13, 10:44 AM
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Chain replacement

Its been a long time since I rode or let alone worked on my bike. I am in currently getting back into riding and dusting off my 1986 Schwinn Voyageur. I need to replace the chain and for the life of me I can't remember changing it out (15 years maybe?). Anyway chain has 112 links. Here is were i hesitate. Wheels and cassette have changed. Currently on 27 inch Mavic ma40 with
Suntour winner Pro cassette 6 speed. This setup has worked well for a few thousand miles. Now I look at whats available today and i,m clueless as to what to replace it with as things have changed a great deal since I rode last. Oh - front crank is the now de****ed Shimano BioPace . Any help or direction would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you
Henry
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Old 07-13-13, 11:02 AM
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Any chain marked for 6s or 7s would be appropriate. You'll probably need a chain tool to splice it, though some come with connector links.

Note, if the bike saw decent mileage during it's prior lifteime you may end up having to replace the freewheel as well, but you won't know until you replace the chain. If the new chain runs smoothly, you're home free, but if it skips under load, especially on the smaller sprockets, then the freewheel is worn.
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Old 07-13-13, 04:46 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY
Note, if the bike saw decent mileage during it's prior lifteime you may end up having to replace the freewheel as well, but you won't know until you replace the chain. If the new chain runs smoothly, you're home free, but if it skips under load, especially on the smaller sprockets, then the freewheel is worn.
Hi,

Even if it doesn't skip a worn freewheel will toast a new chain far
faster than the now very worn original chain ever lasted. So it is
worthwhile to check the old chains stretch over 12", 12 links, 24
pins, report back the position of the pin that should lineup with
12" , but now doesn't, how much it it past 12" (tensioned chain).

rgds, sreten.
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Old 07-13-13, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by sreten
Hi,

Even if it doesn't skip a worn freewheel will toast a new chain far
faster than the now very worn original chain ever lasted. So it is
worthwhile to check the old chains stretch over 12", 12 links, 24
pins, report back the position of the pin that should lineup with
12" , but now doesn't, how much it it past 12" (tensioned chain).

rgds, sreten.
There's serious debate on the extent to which a worn sprocket accelerates chain wear. Of course it's a matter of degree, but the general consensus is that the impact isn't great if the chain runs smoothly. Of course if the sprocket is very worn, the new chain won't run on it anyway.

Most of us routinely replace chains, while keeping our old sprockets, and if worn sprockets materially affected chain life, we'd probably go back to the concept of running chains and sprockets together until they just won't (typically at about 2-3% chain stretch) then replacing everything.

IME, chain life on my 3rd chains is very comparable to that of the first two.
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Old 07-13-13, 05:52 PM
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Hi,

The stretch of the chain coming off is useful information.
Best way to proceed generally depends on that number.

Something I never did in my youth but now understand,
when my chain becomes anything less than perfect, I
should replace it but keep it, and then at least keep
swapping the two chains at the same sort of point.

Rather than a new chain when real problems happen.

rgds, sreten.
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Old 07-13-13, 05:57 PM
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6 speed freewheels had, for the most part, thick steel cogs, and IME they did not wear out at anything like the rate that current 9-11 speed casettes do. I would be very surprised if you need to change your freewheel.
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Old 07-14-13, 08:40 AM
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If a new chain is installed and you don't get new-chain skip on any of the cogs, while pedaling under a heavy load, then there is no reason to replace the freewheel. If a cog doesn't skip with a new chain, it will NOT prematurely wear-out the chain. The new chain merely rides at a slightly lower position on the teeth, than the old chain.
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