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Im cycling up some big hills - need help with cassetts

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Im cycling up some big hills - need help with cassetts

Old 07-15-13, 10:10 AM
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Im cycling up some big hills - need help with cassetts

Hi Guys and Girls, I have signed up for the Cymru Etape in September, which is hilly to say the least, I have a boardman carbon thing, and need help with getting up the monster hills, so just bought an ultegra cassette as it has 11 to 18t (cs-6700) and just received, instructions say compatible with a few model numbers, however the current cassette i have is a shimano 105 cs-700 and bot a cs-600, will it still be okay?? - no idea? - any guidance greatly received - also do I need a specialists tool - must admit I already feel like one..
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Old 07-15-13, 10:14 AM
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Post a Link to your Exact Bike. Year model and pics would be great.
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Old 07-15-13, 11:21 AM
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11-18? I hope this is a typo. Wide cassettes usually run to 28t, and extra wide ones to 32 or 34t, some wider than that also.

Most derailleurs can handle up to 28t OK, subject to some limitations, but you'll probably need a longer chain if you're replacing a much smaller cassette. You'll also need a cassette lockring tool, and some means to keep the existing cassette from spinning backward as you try to unscrew the lockring.

I can't give you any more help beyond that without know much more specific info, such as the chainring combination you're using the wider cassette with.
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Old 07-15-13, 11:33 AM
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The CS-6700 cassette is a 10-speed (10 cogs). If your current cassette is a CS-5700 (not CS-700) then it is also 10-speed and the Ultegra should be an exact replacement. You will need a Shimano lockring tool (Park Tool's FR-5 or equivalent) and a chain whip to remove the old cassette and install the new one. Also, if your old chain has more than a few miles you should replace it with a new one for the new cassette.

BTW, more careful typing and a bit of proofreading would make your questions easier to understand.
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Old 07-15-13, 02:11 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
11-18? I hope this is a typo.
Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
BTW, more careful typing and a bit of proofreading would make your questions easier to understand.
I was wondering about the gearing steps in an 11-18 ten speed cassette.
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Old 07-15-13, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by gregjones View Post
I was wondering about the gearing steps in an 11-18 ten speed cassette.
Finally, the "half-gears" the racers have been wishing for all these years!
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Old 07-15-13, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
Finally, the "half-gears" the racers have been wishing for all these years!
There have been many days when I'd wished for a 15 1/2 tooth cog.....
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Old 07-15-13, 02:19 PM
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OP get your model numbers right first so someone can give accurate info best guess goes to HillRider so far
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Old 07-15-13, 02:24 PM
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In my experience, "27t max" means a 28t will fit. I have two 28t cassettes on "27t max" derailleurs, and didn't have to do anything special. Btw, I did install new chains at the same time as the 28t cassettes, so I was able to guarantee a properly-sized chain.
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Old 07-15-13, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by gregjones View Post
I was wondering about the gearing steps in an 11-18 ten speed cassette.
For the two most-used cogs, they give you extras. In case one wears out
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Old 07-15-13, 02:53 PM
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Having had a quick look at the route, a 11-28 with either a 53/39 or 50/34 will be more than sufficient. Boardmans are normally spec'd for the starter rider, so it should have a 50/34 and a 11-25t cassette, which will get you round, would be concentrating on training more than the cassette to use at this stage.

For tools, in addition to those mention above, you really need to torque the cassette lock ring down after fitting this, you need a torque wrench, preferably 3/8 or 1/2 inch drive, with a 24mm socket, the torque wrench needs to go to at least 40Nm. Also some anti sieze to apply to the splines of the freehub is a good idea as well.
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Old 07-16-13, 08:33 AM
  #12  
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Describe Your Training Plan

OP, looks like you have ~7 weeks. Please describe your bike and how you ride daily/weekly. Summarize your training method, weight and nutritional approach on and off the bike.

What is your current riding/climbing capacity for a day?

The 28T rear cog will likely be helpful for you, but it's a minor part of the story. PG
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Old 07-16-13, 03:14 PM
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Boardman Spec

Hi All, the spec is as follows:-

Approximate Weight (KG): 8.25
Brake Type: Dual Pivot Caliper Brake
Chainset: FSA Gossamer Pro BB30 compact crank 50/34T
Forks: Full Carbon
Frame Colour: Carbon matt
Frame Material: Carbon
Front Brake: Shimano 105 Dual pivot
Front Mech: Shimano 105
Gear Shifters: Shimano 105
Gender: Mens
Handle Bars: Boardman alloy anatomic
Headset: FSA Orbit 1.1/8 - 1.5 Aheadset
Number of Gears: 20
Pedals: N/A
Rear Brake: Shimano 105 Dual pivot
Rear Mech: Shimano 105
Saddle: Fizik Arione
Seatpost: Carbon Boardman 350mm x 31.6mm black
Stem: Boardman black alloy 31.8mm
Tyre size: 23c
Tyres: Continental Ultrasport 700x23 black
Cassette: 12-25T
Exact Frame Size: 53cm
Geometry: Semi Compact
Wheel size: 700c
Hubs: Mavic Aksium
Rims: Mavic Aksium
Suspension: Rigid

url is http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/s...Id_165710#tab2

I am 5ft 6 inches around 11stone 4lbs, comfortable with 50+m rides, and shorter rides in the week, cycling back from work, sometimes there and back which is around 25miles each way, some hills at the back end of the cycle

Going to need to ramp up training as useless on hills, on a diet of around 1400 cals a day

Thanks you all for your advice so far, never used a forum before so was quite surprised with the response

Originally Posted by Davidwa View Post
Hi Guys and Girls, I have signed up for the Cymru Etape in September, which is hilly to say the least, I have a boardman carbon thing, and need help with getting up the monster hills, so just bought an ultegra cassette as it has 11 to 18t (cs-6700) and just received, instructions say compatible with a few model numbers, however the current cassette i have is a shimano 105 cs-700 and bot a cs-600, will it still be okay?? - no idea? - any guidance greatly received - also do I need a specialists tool - must admit I already feel like one..
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Old 07-16-13, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
OP, looks like you have ~7 weeks. Please describe your bike and how you ride daily/weekly. Summarize your training method, weight and nutritional approach on and off the bike.

What is your current riding/climbing capacity for a day?

The 28T rear cog will likely be helpful for you, but it's a minor part of the story. PG
Originally Posted by Davidwa View Post
Hi All, the spec is as follows:-

Approximate Weight (KG): 8.25
Brake Type: Dual Pivot Caliper Brake
Chainset: FSA Gossamer Pro BB30 compact crank 50/34T
Forks: Full Carbon
Frame Colour: Carbon matt
Frame Material: Carbon
Front Brake: Shimano 105 Dual pivot
Front Mech: Shimano 105
Gear Shifters: Shimano 105
Gender: Mens
Handle Bars: Boardman alloy anatomic
Headset: FSA Orbit 1.1/8 - 1.5 Aheadset
Number of Gears: 20
Pedals: N/A
Rear Brake: Shimano 105 Dual pivot
Rear Mech: Shimano 105
Saddle: Fizik Arione
Seatpost: Carbon Boardman 350mm x 31.6mm black
Stem: Boardman black alloy 31.8mm
Tyre size: 23c
Tyres: Continental Ultrasport 700x23 black
Cassette: 12-25T
Exact Frame Size: 53cm
Geometry: Semi Compact
Wheel size: 700c
Hubs: Mavic Aksium
Rims: Mavic Aksium
Suspension: Rigid

url is http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/s...Id_165710#tab2

I am 5ft 6 inches around 11stone 4lbs, comfortable with 50+m rides, and shorter rides in the week, cycling back from work, sometimes there and back which is around 25miles each way, some hills at the back end of the cycle

Going to need to ramp up training as useless on hills, on a diet of around 1400 cals a day

Thanks you all for your advice so far, never used a forum before so was quite surprised with the response
Given these facts going to a 28t may help a little but being ready for it physically will be a bigger factor.
Just go slow and pace yourself do not ride at someone else's pace.
Going to even a bigger cassette would make it easer but slower climb but may require more parts than you would want to swap out at this time.
Only you know how you fill climbing as you will need to.

Good luck in any case have fun most of all!
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Old 07-16-13, 03:51 PM
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OP,

I have a bike like yours.

I was able to put on a 12/30 cassette and ride mountains in Tennessee.

Have fun.
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Old 07-16-13, 03:52 PM
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It looks like the grades are about 5% (e.g. from mile 20 to mile 24) and the longest climb of that grade is about 4 miles. You are of reasonable weight. A 34 x 25 low gear could be enough, but no harm having that 34 x 28 option.

The main thing for you to do, in my opinion, is to find a climb that is 5% grade and 5 miles long, and do hill repeats - ride up, turn around, ride down, turn around, ride up, repeat over and over - five or six times. That is, after all, pretty much what the actual route is going to be like. You need to build up your strength and endurance, and learn how you need to pace yourself for to last for 5 miles or about 30 minutes of 5% grade, and how much you recover in the next 5 miles of descending. You also need to learn how much you must eat and drink, and how to do so safely while descending at a pretty high speed.

Days spent training on flat roads won't be as useful.

Also, you need to eat more, at least on on the days you are training. 1400 cal/day is what a small sedentary woman might eat. You're going to be riding hard days, burning up 600+ cal/hour, trying to build your strength and stamina, losing weight should be secondary. Plenty of protein, and don't go "low-carb".
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Old 07-17-13, 05:02 AM
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It looks like the grades are about 5% (e.g. from mile 20 to mile 24) and the longest climb of that grade is about 4 miles.
I'm disappointed - thought we were talking about some BIG hills here.
A 15% grade I can see asking about gearing advice . A 5% grade? Probably the motor needs more work than the gearing.

Last edited by Burton; 07-17-13 at 05:05 AM.
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Old 07-18-13, 01:16 AM
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That is great advice, will up the training and the diet, appreciate your help
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Old 07-18-13, 01:17 AM
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understood, will get training..., thanks
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Old 07-18-13, 01:17 AM
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good to know, will be changing as soon as the tools come in..
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Old 07-18-13, 01:18 AM
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Thanks, looks like some climbing is coming my way..
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Old 07-18-13, 05:19 AM
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You do need to be in shape for the grades you will face but in my experience I would not worry terribly about training for a long climb by doing them. That is fortunate because finding a 5 mile (or even 2 mile) 5% grade is not possible in most places. In my experience once you are in good enough shape to climb for a reasonable amount of time (10 minutes is plenty) without getting winded or having any leg discomfort you will be able to handle longer climbs.

Rolling hills or grades that are reasonably challenging (max 7%) are more than enough to get into shape for climbing. It's the miles that count, or if you can't put in a lot of miles interval training can shorten things up. Obviously reducing your own weight can help greatly. Reducing bike weight is much less helpful, as you can't take off comparable amounts. Given the bike you have I would ignore any attempts to further reduce its weight, especially as it takes away from time on the road.

I have a few techniques or hints for climbing:

1. Don't try to get a "head start" on a long or hard climb. Powering into a hill just tires our your lungs and muscles with no real benefit. Do exactly the opposite and slow down before you hit the climb. The exception is "roller coaster" linked hills, which are best done with a tuck and coast down after pre-selecting a gear for the next uphill, coasting until you hit the right speed for that gear, and then, depending on length of hill either smoothly pedaling up or powering over the next hill - obviously takes some experience but one can actually increase speed over doing flat terrain.

2. If you are short on gearing go lower on cadence and gear early on. Again, slow down and hit your low gear when still on the level. It can be helpful to pedal as low as 60 rpm or so.

3. Do not look up the hill to see how far you've gone. Look to the side instead.

4. If it gets really bad the mantra "no hill, no hill" has helped me.
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