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Re-lacing rear wheel with IGH

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Re-lacing rear wheel with IGH

Old 07-24-13, 08:47 AM
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GTryder
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Re-lacing rear wheel with IGH

Having "done my homework", I have pretty much decided to upgrade from Shimano Nexus Inter-3 to NuVinci N360. Now the big question - DIY on the re-lace or take it to the LBS?

Obviously new shorter spokes will be required along with a bolt on disc brake rotor.

I have re-laced one wheel - over 40 years ago. It was the front wheel on a Raleigh 3 speed - bent rim. As I remember, I was able to re-use most of the spokes, and it was a PITA to get it running (almost?) true; but it was such an improvement over the bent rim that was on the bike when I bought it.

With the investment I am looking at I'm thinking paying the LBS might be worthwhile.

Last edited by GTryder; 07-24-13 at 08:50 AM. Reason: typo
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Old 07-24-13, 09:31 AM
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I agree that the final tensioning up and truing of this wheel is best done by some one who has proven skills at producing long lasting wheels. How is your relationship with the LBS? perhaps you can do the initial lacing (following their spoke thread prep guide lines) and have them only provide the final steps. This could save you a little bit of $ and give you some personal investment as well. Andy.
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Old 07-24-13, 09:40 AM
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Given what you're spending and your lack of experience, having a pro do the job makes sense.

Of course you can learn and let this be your first wheel, and all you'd be risking is the cost of the spokes and your time (reuse rim). Nothing you can do will damage the hub, though it's possible to damage the rim.

If your existing heel is in decent shape, consider keeping it intact and buying a new rim for the NuVinci hub. The value of the existing wheel should be higher than the cost of the additional rim, whether you keep it for a future "B" bike, or sell it.
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Old 07-24-13, 11:07 AM
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Considering the extra work needed to take the wheel apart before you build it back up, unless your rim is really good quality and in very good shape, almost new, it would be far better to build a complete new wheel, and possibly try to sell the old one. A complete wheel is worth more than the hub alone and the old spokes are worth nothing
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Old 07-24-13, 11:23 AM
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+ the Shop will help with service, after finishing the build . minor truing if the rim goes out a little bit after riding a while .

of course DIY is DIY.
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Old 07-24-13, 12:41 PM
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Thanks everyone for the replies and great advice. LBS labour charge for wheel building is $50, definitely worth it!

I was going to use the existing rim as it is next to new and I had thought of re-using the 3 speed hub on my single speed. Current 3 speed is 26" and single speed is 700C, otherwise it would be a "No-Brainer" to keep the existing wheel intact.

Keeping the existing 3 speed 26" wheel might be a good idea, if for some reason, the NuVinci setup doesn't work out or to convert the bike back to stock; should I decide to sell it some point. Or sell the existing wheel on eBay to recoup some of the upgrade expenses.

A simpler alternative might be using the NuVinci on the single speed (new 700c wheel build) and just keep the 26" 3 speed bike as it is for a bad weather/winter commuter- the main reason I bought it in the first place. Decisions, decisions...
...at any rate getting the LBS to build the wheel(s) is definitely worth $50.

Last edited by GTryder; 07-24-13 at 12:45 PM. Reason: typo
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Old 07-24-13, 02:11 PM
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Originally Posted by GTryder View Post
Thanks everyone for the replies and great advice. LBS labour charge for wheel building is $50, definitely worth it!
Only if they do a good job which I wouldn't count on especially where most wheel sales are complete (either inexpensive through QBP or as boutique wheels) so it's a rare event and there are more profitable ways to spend their mechanics' time so they're unlikely to put enough time into the wheel.

The last time I had a bike shop build wheels for me the rear wheel wouldn't stay true because they didn't put enough tension in it and the front folded up (with too little tension wheels it takes a smaller hit to completely unload the spokes at which point the rim becomes laterally unsupported, can shift sideways, and will collapse as it springs back restoring tension).

I started building my own wheels after that.

I was feeling lazy and let a bike shop handle swapping my wife's 3 speed IGH for an 8. BAD move. It didn't stay true because tension was low over-all and very low in places. Some spokes were too long and one ran out of threads getting to good tension.

Getting it right was more work than if I built it myself keeping tension relatively uniform along the way.

To add insult to injury that learning experience cost me over $100 for labor, the shop's markup on spokes compared to online prices, and sales tax.

I strongly suggest choosing one of the following:

1. Learn to build wheels yourself. It's time consuming but not hard, about like setting up a front derailleur. Jobst Brandt tested his book _The Bicycle Wheel_ by having each of his grade school sons build a wheel set with no additional help. With some patience you can have wheels which will be as good as they get. It's nice to be back on the road after spending $50-$70 for a rim replacement after you bend one or wear out the brake tracks. While I wouldn't want a job building wheels it's an enjoyable thing to do sometimes and goes well with beer.

2. Delegate it to a reputable one-man operation like Peter White or pcad. Using a reputable wheel building shop isn't good enough because you might get an idiot on his first and last week with the company (I tried that). Using a shop that's merely reputable is right out because of how uncommon wheel building is and the more profitable demands on a mechanics time that may lead to short cuts (I tried that too).

3. Order a machine built wheel on-line because that guarantees medicore versus a probability of unacceptable from a hand-built LBS wheel. Stress relieve (squeeze near parallel spokes together hard) so you don't have early spoke breakage due to fatigue. If you're approaching 200 pounds or weigh more bump it up to sufficiently high uniform tension (there's a $5 cell phone app for that) where 105kgf drive side is usually good with whatever it takes to center the wheel on the non-drive side

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 07-25-13 at 09:20 AM.
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Old 07-24-13, 02:52 PM
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The 2 shops I checked with are small independent owner/family-operated businesses, with good reputations, but they are an hour and a half drive. My small town city does not have a dedicated bike shop, rather 2 high end owner-operated sporting goods shops, with decent bike mechanics. I know one local owner very well and his son is their mechanic, but he recommended both of the shops in our neighboring big city for wheel building.

One of my wife's coworkers builds his own road/touring bikes and could likely do it or help me, but he is away on an extended vacation in Europe visiting family & doing some bike touring.

Last edited by GTryder; 07-24-13 at 02:55 PM. Reason: typo
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Old 07-24-13, 04:32 PM
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Originally Posted by GTryder View Post
The 2 shops I checked with are small independent owner/family-operated businesses, with good reputations, but they are an hour and a half drive. My small town city does not have a dedicated bike shop, rather 2 high end owner-operated sporting goods shops, with decent bike mechanics. I know one local owner very well and his son is their mechanic, but he recommended both of the shops in our neighboring big city for wheel building.
I got curious so I looked up Prince Albert on a map, and see you really are in the middle of noplace. One of the more skilled people on this forum is SixtyFiver, who's someplace to your east in Saskatchewan. He might be the right guy to build this properly at a fair price. If you can work out a deal, the smart move would to have the various parts shipped directly to him, so there's no duplicate shipping, then arrange pick up or shipping of the finished wheel.

I took the liberty of sending him a link to this thread, so he'll probably send you a PM, and the rest is up to you.
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Old 07-24-13, 04:57 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
I got curious so I looked up Prince Albert on a map, and see you really are in the middle of noplace. One of the more skilled people on this forum is SixtyFiver, who's someplace to your east in Saskatchewan. He might be the right guy to build this properly at a fair price. If you can work out a deal, the smart move would to have the various parts shipped directly to him, so there's no duplicate shipping, then arrange pick up or shipping of the finished wheel.

I took the liberty of sending him a link to this thread, so he'll probably send you a PM, and the rest is up to you.
Thanks for the plug... I am actually a little west of St. Albert.

I always prefer that people shop locally and support their local business whenever possible but if the OP needs a wheel built and no-one close can handle it, this is what I do quite well and offer a lifetime guarantee on the build.

An hour and a half trip is a little closer than I am and if the shops there have good reputations I'd talk to them.
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Old 07-24-13, 07:43 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
I got curious so I looked up Prince Albert on a map, and see you really are in the middle of noplace. One of the more skilled people on this forum is SixtyFiver, who's someplace to your east in Saskatchewan. He might be the right guy to build this properly at a fair price. If you can work out a deal, the smart move would to have the various parts shipped directly to him, so there's no duplicate shipping, then arrange pick up or shipping of the finished wheel.

I took the liberty of sending him a link to this thread, so he'll probably send you a PM, and the rest is up to you.
Thanks FB.
We've been in contact. He's about 7 hours west of here - but there's always bus freight (fast, inexpensive and very capable of handling larger parcels).
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