Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Well, that's less disastrous.

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Well, that's less disastrous.

Old 07-25-13, 12:45 AM
  #1  
Frum
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 66
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well, that's less disastrous.

All of the bike shops here in my town get swamped with cheap bikes, especially the GMC Denali.

But, I was kind of surprised to see one of them that didn't seem half bad. Apparently GMC took the crappy yellow Denali, added a few namebrand components and made less of a disaster out of the bike. Microshift 2/3x8 drive train. For 300 dollars... I'm actually kind of impressed with what GMC did.

So anyone had this considerably better death trap (they put dual pivot brakes and alloy rims on it, so it's probably slightly better) in their shop or between their feet yet?

Frum is offline  
Old 07-25-13, 03:51 AM
  #2  
aidanpringle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Scotland (UK)
Posts: 493

Bikes: 2015 B'TWIN Triban 500se 2011 Nox Airbase 1995 Giant Team Bike, 1990's Specialized Hardrock.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 4 Posts
I wouldn't be sure on buying that personally, I would rather have a bike with a good frame and less good components, at least then I can upgrade without having to get a new frame as well. To me that bike just doesn't look right, the crankset, stem, frame and saddle all look cheap. I would get a used bike for $300 instead of this.
aidanpringle is offline  
Old 07-25-13, 04:12 AM
  #3  
sreten
Banned.
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brighton UK
Posts: 1,662

Bikes: 20" Folder, Road Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Frum View Post
All of the bike shops here in my town get swamped with cheap bikes, especially the GMC Denali.

For 300 dollars... I'm actually kind of impressed with what GMC did.

So anyone had this considerably better death trap (they put dual pivot brakes and
alloy rims on it, so it's probably slightly better) in their shop or between their feet yet?
Hi,

It doesn't look that much better for twice the price, better brakes and
brifters, a double instead of triple crank, probably better derailleurs.

The rims look the same, probably has pointlessly skinnier tyres.

The $150 version is not a deathtrap properly adjusted.
Better front brakes pads are good idea. Keep the old
ones as spares for the rear. Adjust it and ride it.
For what it is, it is good value.

rgds, sreten.
sreten is offline  
Old 07-25-13, 06:51 AM
  #4  
HillRider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 31,746

Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1255 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 82 Times in 70 Posts
Anyone know who actually specs/imports these things? Obviously they bought the rights to the GMC and Denali names from General Motors as I'm pretty sure GM hasn't gone into the bike business. Maybe GM was so desperate for cash before their bankruptcy they sold anything that would bring in money.
HillRider is offline  
Old 07-25-13, 08:00 AM
  #5  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,968

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4353 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Yes, GMC had absolutely nothing to do with these bikes other than licensing the name. The bikes are spec'd and imported by a different entity. If I had to guess, I'd say these are by Pacific, the same folks who've bought up many of the other names in the bike biz, and speciqlize in the mass market channel.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 07-25-13, 08:09 AM
  #6  
Kimmo
bike whisperer
 
Kimmo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Melbourne, Oz
Posts: 8,393

Bikes: https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=152015&p=1404231

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 604 Post(s)
Liked 93 Times in 79 Posts
I'm wondering how threaded headsets are still a thing.

Surely threadless is cheaper to make? Seems to me, in terms of production cost, it should be pretty much of a muchness except for the thread on the steerer, a significant extra process. A threadless stem might cost a tad more to make, but a threadless headset should be a tad cheaper.
Kimmo is offline  
Old 07-25-13, 08:27 AM
  #7  
LesterOfPuppets
cowboy, steel horse, etc
 
LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Valley of the Sun.
Posts: 32,869

Bikes: everywhere

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4190 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 101 Posts
Aww, they got rid of the aero seat tube!

I put some RSX brifters on a Denali but that bike was such a pig. Really turned slowly. All my mountain bikes are more sprightly than the Denali. The slack head tube angle should be nice for those wanting to run clip on bars.

I found the brakes to be adequate, not sure why the concern about those. And the olde rims were aluminum also, but wheels were very heavy.


2013-06-26_11-04-33_395 by Wheel Deals Vancouver, WA, on Flickr

Last edited by LesterOfPuppets; 07-25-13 at 08:30 AM.
LesterOfPuppets is online now  
Old 07-25-13, 03:11 PM
  #8  
tanguy frame
Senior Member
 
tanguy frame's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Portland, OR metro area
Posts: 981
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I saw someone riding one the other day. it had 2 wheels and he was pedaling it up a hill, seemed to work...
tanguy frame is offline  
Old 07-25-13, 03:39 PM
  #9  
sreten
Banned.
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brighton UK
Posts: 1,662

Bikes: 20" Folder, Road Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post
I'm wondering how threaded headsets are still a thing.

Surely threadless is cheaper to make? Seems to me, in terms of production cost, it should be pretty much of a muchness except for the thread on the steerer, a significant extra process. A threadless stem might cost a tad more to make, but a threadless headset should be a tad cheaper.
Hi,

Tooling costs which are very high and need to be recouped. So whilst
a modern headset may be cheaper to make long run, you charge more
for it than the going rate for a threaded headset which usually has now
reached the point all tooling costs are covered. Consequently for the
same reasons most old bike technology is cheap. Once the tooling
costs are recovered in a relatively short timescale, you can carry
on making the same parts cheap and still make a profit.

rgds, sreten.

I imagine in many parts of the world threadless is very rare.
Its nowhere near as adjustable or any better than threaded.

Last edited by sreten; 07-25-13 at 03:50 PM.
sreten is offline  
Old 07-25-13, 03:49 PM
  #10  
bobotech
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Spokane, WA
Posts: 2,255

Bikes: Specialized Sequoia Elite/Motobecane Fantom Cross Team Ti/'85 Trek 520

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Looks like to me that the top half isn't all that bad for a bargain ride (microshift shifters, better drop bars, dual pivot brakes, etc) but the bottom half still needs some decent upgrades.

I wonder about the front derailleur.
bobotech is offline  
Old 07-25-13, 04:16 PM
  #11  
phulin
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 108
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The Denali is made by Kent Bicycles. There are some old threads around the forum from a guy who claimed to commute 40mi round trip every day on one. Not clear if he was telling the truth.

http://www.kentbicycles.com/bikes/gmc
phulin is offline  
Old 07-25-13, 04:30 PM
  #12  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,968

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4353 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by phulin View Post
The Denali is made by Kent Bicycles. There are some old threads around the forum from a guy who claimed to commute 40mi round trip every day on one. Not clear if he was telling the truth.
Probably true. On my daily commute, the largest number of riders I see actually riding every day, are folks riding what many here would call BSOs.

These bikes see tons of use, and are often in pathetic shape, but those at the bottom pf the pay scale can't afford better, and a Cosco or Walmart bike meets their needs for cheap (sort of) reliable transportation. They mostly do their own work, or use a local street mechanic, who sends them to Walmart for stuff and installs it for them.

These people simply cannot afford to walk into the typical bike shop, so when their bike finally dies, they replace it and start fresh. If you do the math, buying a complete BSO and replacing it comes out cheaper than the upkeep alone on a better bike, in $$/mile (unless you do your own work).
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 07-25-13, 09:09 PM
  #13  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 18,730
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 94 Times in 80 Posts
I have to say, I was impressed by how badly the wheels were trued on the Denali I put together. Would be interesting if it was made by Kent, we used to see the occasional Kent back in the day, mostly just a curiosity though
unterhausen is offline  
Old 07-26-13, 10:29 AM
  #14  
TallRider
Senior Member
 
TallRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 4,451
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 127 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
I've seen a number of these road bikes around campus at UNC. Mostly with grip shifters (!) and a two-piece drop bar with sleeve to join them, presumably necessary to get the grip shifters onto the bar since you couldn't push it around the drops.

Edit: Here are pictures of that generation of the bike, with the two-piece handlebar connected by a sleeve. I saw this on campus a few hours after initially writing this post.

Brifters and dual-pivot brakes are a def step up.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
MG_1796.JPG (78.9 KB, 15 views)
File Type: jpg
MG_1797.jpg (80.2 KB, 14 views)
__________________
"c" is not a unit that measures tire width

Last edited by TallRider; 07-27-13 at 12:42 PM. Reason: added photos
TallRider is offline  
Old 07-26-13, 04:21 PM
  #15  
sreten
Banned.
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brighton UK
Posts: 1,662

Bikes: 20" Folder, Road Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by TallRider View Post
Brifters and dual-pivot brakes are a def step up.
Hi, So is double the price, rgds, sreten.

BFB I don't think the $300 version is near the $150 version.

Last edited by sreten; 07-26-13 at 04:25 PM.
sreten is offline  
Old 07-27-13, 10:09 PM
  #16  
Kimmo
bike whisperer
 
Kimmo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Melbourne, Oz
Posts: 8,393

Bikes: https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=152015&p=1404231

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 604 Post(s)
Liked 93 Times in 79 Posts
That's a good point, M.W.

Sreten, what you say about recouping tooling costs makes sense, but threadless has been around quite a while now; I'm pretty sure I've seen it on at least a few bikes around the $300 range in the last couple of years. Threaded just seems to be taking ages to die, and M.W.'s suggestion would explain it I guess.

Originally Posted by sreten View Post
Its nowhere near as adjustable or any better than threaded.
I have to take issue with this... threadless is superior in a couple of considerable regards, and inferior in only one relatively minor aspect, aside from giving more noobs the chance to mess up headset preload: if you're running your stem low, you have to either commit to a low stem or live with a bunch of spacers above it. If you want the bars higher than your steerer and will allow, a half-decent stem with some rise won't cost the earth, and is a lighter and more rigid method of attaching the bars than a more acute stem hanging off a longer steerer anyway.

Speaking of which, this brings us to the main advantage, which is a win/win on what's usually stiffness versus weight, something which a lot of folks would agree is worth a bit of a compromise on other fronts. It's static weight, but actually not really since it's high up on the bike, where you'll notice a difference of as little as 100g when you stand on it. After tyres and rims, seat and post, bars, brifters and stem. And the value of the stiffness (and threadless gives you the 31.8 option) is pretty damn real, IME... more than the part-placebo effect of lighter weight. And I'm only 65kg.

And then there's reliability. I've yet to come across a threadless stem seized to a steerer, for a start...

And that thing that happens when the threaded cup (or cone, depending on the HS) gets loose enough on the steerer to make for a clunk under hard braking no matter how hard you tighten the locknut? A thing of the past, thanks to the threadless wedge ring.

Not to mention other thread-related woes like what happens when the tabbed washer rotates, and so on...

And if you dislike the aesthetics, remind yourself that form follows function. I'm not a fan of pinch bolts hanging off the back of the steerer myself, but there are a few stems out there that integrate a pinch bolt into the extension... and at least the headset wrench flats are banished.
Kimmo is offline  
Old 07-27-13, 10:28 PM
  #17  
anixi
Jack of all trades
 
anixi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Spokane, WA
Posts: 2,351

Bikes: Pug Triathlon&PRN-10 Ventana El Saltamontes Spec Stumpjumper Conversion

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by TallRider View Post
I've seen a number of these road bikes around campus at UNC. Mostly with grip shifters (!) and a two-piece drop bar with sleeve to join them, presumably necessary to get the grip shifters onto the bar since you couldn't push it around the drops.

Edit: Here are pictures of that generation of the bike, with the two-piece handlebar connected by a sleeve. I saw this on campus a few hours after initially writing this post.

Brifters and dual-pivot brakes are a def step up.
On our way through downtown today, we saw one of this gen. Denali. It had been stripped of the front wheel, pedals, rear derailleur and other parts. Obviously the shifters are not very desirable, since they were still attached, as well as the nutted rear wheel. If it didn't have a U-lock, it would be tempting to grab and overhaul. The market here is good for these bikes at about $75.
anixi is offline  
Old 07-27-13, 10:43 PM
  #18  
Turbo231
Senior Member
 
Turbo231's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Stettler, Alberta
Posts: 230

Bikes: Trek 800, Free Spirit Town and Country, 80's Norco Nomad

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If I was in the market for a NEW bike, I'd seriously look at one...mostly because 1) I'm cheap and 2) I do my own work. It's at a great price point and I can't image parts would be expensive to replace. It's like buying a Chevette if people remember those, some people like new.
Turbo231 is offline  
Old 07-27-13, 11:07 PM
  #19  
onespeedbiker
Retro Grouch
 
onespeedbiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Santa Cruz
Posts: 2,210

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm thinking the use of threaded headsets probably comes from the huge number already made and in stock. Further, there were/are are just a ton of generic cheap threaded forks made where the threadless versions tend to be a little more specialized so they cost more.
onespeedbiker is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
ChiefTJS
Bicycle Mechanics
17
04-02-18 07:35 AM
flyingbuttons
Bicycle Mechanics
15
10-09-17 12:02 PM
mynameuk
Bicycle Mechanics
25
11-01-13 09:56 AM
cnguyen0320
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
18
07-07-13 11:25 PM
notrandom
Mountain Biking
16
11-24-11 04:01 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.