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Spring Forks on a Cheap Bike

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Spring Forks on a Cheap Bike

Old 07-27-13, 01:03 AM
  #1  
rommer25
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Spring Forks on a Cheap Bike

I have an old Schwinn Clear Creek comfort bike. I use it to ride around my work site. I brought it used for 50.00 dollars about fifteen months ago. The springs in the fork are getting soft. Does anyone know how I can take them out and make a stiff fork or if there is a replacement fork (with no springs) for it? Because of the quality of the bike, I do not wish to spend a lot of money on it. Any advice would be appreciated, TM.
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Old 07-27-13, 05:03 AM
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Hi,

There is always something you can do with some ingenuity,
stiffen it, dampen it, both or lock it. T don't know the fork
details enough to suggest what you should do though.

rgds, sreten.

Last edited by sreten; 07-27-13 at 05:21 PM.
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Old 07-27-13, 09:21 AM
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If the bike had a threaded fork, which has I'm guessing might be the case since you said "old", you can replace the fork with a plain ol' rigid fork. I've found that a lot of bike shops don't seem to carry them in stock for 26" wheels anymore, but you can order them from places like Niagara Cycle if need be. They start around $20. To get the right fork, you'll need a few measurements from your existing fork: the diameter of the steerer tube (1" or 1 1/8"), the length of the steerer tube, and the length of the threaded part of the steerer tube.
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Old 07-27-13, 10:50 AM
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Here's a link to a post about making your own elastomers to replace the springs. There are also kits made and sold for a variety of forks, but these are pricy, so I'd pass.

You need to be handy and a bit creative. Rather than guess, buy elastomer in 2 or 3 hardnesses, and work with shorter blocks, figuring 3-4 per side. This makes drilling them easier, and allows you to mix them to get the right spring for your fork.

BTW- I've never drilled this kind of elastomer, but have machined rubber, so here's a hint. Soft materials stiffen and are far easier to drill when cold. Put the elastomers in the freezer overnight, and take them out to drill one at a time.
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Old 07-27-13, 12:11 PM
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I'd be tempted to visit a local auto parts store to see if spring spacers might do the trick.
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Old 07-27-13, 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
If the bike had a threaded fork, which has I'm guessing might be the case since you said "old", you can replace the fork with a plain ol' rigid fork. I've found that a lot of bike shops don't seem to carry them in stock for 26" wheels anymore, but you can order them from places like Niagara Cycle if need be. They start around $20. To get the right fork, you'll need a few measurements from your existing fork: the diameter of the steerer tube (1" or 1 1/8"), the length of the steerer tube, and the length of the threaded part of the steerer tube.
+1 on going with a rigid fork. I'll take a rigid fork over a cheap spring loaded fork any day. Check with you local bike co-op. Take the old fork along and match up type and length. You can buy suspension corrected forks which account for the front end drop from putting a load on your old suspension fork, but for a commuter, you may not want or need it, depending on what else you can find. Online you can find some hi-ten forks for $20-30 or chrome-moly for around $35-40.
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Old 07-27-13, 09:41 PM
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Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
If the bike had a threaded fork, which has I'm guessing might be the case since you said "old", you can replace the fork with a plain ol' rigid fork. I've found that a lot of bike shops don't seem to carry them in stock for 26" wheels anymore, but you can order them from places like Niagara Cycle if need be. They start around $20. To get the right fork, you'll need a few measurements from your existing fork: the diameter of the steerer tube (1" or 1 1/8"), the length of the steerer tube, and the length of the threaded part of the steerer tube.
Or rommer25 could save himself a lot of hassle by converting a threaded fork to a threadless. it's an easy conversion and is a would be a lot easier to set up then a threaded fork. Either way, a rigid fork is the way to go.
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Old 07-28-13, 09:52 AM
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When you said spring forks I thought you were talking about something like this.

https://2009.feltracing.com/09/images...og/xl/9878.png
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Old 07-28-13, 10:42 AM
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Steel springs getting soft? My Guess: steel spring tempering process, was NFG in the 1st place.



I'd agree , just put in a suspension corrected (so the head angle is remaining the same) replacement fork in.

You got the bike cheap , so you have savings to apply to doubling the usefulness as the investment is added.
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