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Replacing the Rim on a Tacoed Wheel

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Replacing the Rim on a Tacoed Wheel

Old 07-28-13, 11:33 AM
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Replacing the Rim on a Tacoed Wheel

A good buddy tacoed his front wheel pretty bad yesterday. I want to find him a rim and lace it on for him. Ive built several wheels, but I have never had to find a rim that would work with the original spokes.

Other than it being 26" and 32 hole. Is the rim depth the only other measurement I need to match in order to reuse the spokes?

Thanks!
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Old 07-28-13, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by blown240
A good buddy tacoed his front wheel pretty bad yesterday. I want to find him a rim and lace it on for him. Ive built several wheels, but I have never had to find a rim that would work with the original spokes.

Other than it being 26" and 32 hole. Is the rim depth the only other measurement I need to match in order to reuse the spokes?

Thanks!
That's the key. The easiest way is to look up the ERD on the maker's site, or any of the spoke length calculator sites. Then shop for a rim with the same ERD.

Note: published ERD spec don't always match, so confirm it by checking a few sites. If 3 agree and one is different assume the 3 are right. If they all disagree by 1-2mm, take the average.
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Old 07-28-13, 12:14 PM
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FYI, ERD is the Effective Rim Diameter. That's the diameter that matters: The distance from where the spoke nipple sits across to the opposite spoke nipple seat.
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Old 07-28-13, 12:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Homebrew01
FYI, ERD is the Effective Rim Diameter. That's the diameter that matters: The distance from where the spoke nipple sits across to the opposite spoke nipple seat.
This is precisely why I hate ERD. As currently used, this is the diameter of the imaginary circle formed by the desired end of the spokes, namely about 1mm short of the tops of the nipples. Since the spokes go beyond the nipple seat and into the head 2mm or so, the ERD will typically be about 4mm (2x2mm) greater than the actual measurement taken at the nipple seat.

I've been railing about this for something like 25 years (ever since J. Brandt defined this spec) that we go back to a real spec that can be measured, namely the diameter at the nipple seat, and let the builder add the spoke engagement of his choice. It's this discrepancy because of differing assumptions about spoke engagement that makes ERD specs unreliable, and why I suggest that the OP confirm the data.
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Old 07-28-13, 12:36 PM
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Buy the Identical Product, same rim. then you can rebuild the wheel, with the same spokes..

wheel lacing is even simplified, by taping the new rim along side the old one

and moving the spokes from 1 hole in one to the same hole in the new rim.

carefully count turns of the spoke nipple so you tension them equally ,
or the wheel wont be round.
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Old 07-28-13, 01:47 PM
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Sounds good. Thanks for all the info guys!
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Old 07-28-13, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob
wheel lacing is even simplified, by taping the new rim along side the old one
It sounds silly, but ensure you orient the new rim with the existing one (Spoke hole direction if applicable - up or down - and valve hole location). Good luck!

PS: I've had good luck over the past few decades simply using calipers to measure the old rim's depth and then getting a new rim with a similar depth. And I'd recommend using new nipples.
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Old 07-28-13, 03:40 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob
carefully count turns of the spoke nipple so you tension them equally ,
or the wheel wont be round.
I stick my thumbnail in the last spoke thread and spin down the nipple until my thumbnail stops it.
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Old 07-28-13, 04:59 PM
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I own a crank style screwdriver made for wheel building , so I bring all the spokes up to tension equally .

taller center pin in the tip .. once the spoke end wont let the blade contact the slot, any more ,
I get out the spoke wrench for the rest of the job,
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