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Dork disks are not useless

Old 08-29-13, 07:01 PM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by sreten View Post
Hi,

Make a list of why they are used. Starting with with my OP.
The latter part of 2) is simply wrong and opinionated bias.
What intended purpose do they no longer serve ?

rgds, sreten.
I'll leave the list to you. As for your last question: if they're degraded, weakened and cracked, they will not likely prevent a jam or spoke damage. Just my opinion of course since I've never shifted my chain past the inner sprocket and therefore have tested neither a strong/new one nor an old/weak one.

A few months ago, I was riding in the "Ride of Silence" with a bunch of strangers. The woman in front of me was riding either a mountain bike or a hybrid of some sort - I do know it had a long cage rear derailleur. She shifted and I could hear the music of a derailleur cage brushing the spokes. She messed with her shifter a while and then shifted to the next outer sprocket and the music stopped. I looked and saw that the derailleur cage was obviously leaning inward - either the hanger or the cage was bent and out of vertical alignment. When I had a chance I mentioned to her that she should get that checked out right away because she might shift into her spokes and cause a problem. The point here is that I wonder if the spoke protector she had in place would have helped in that particular instance - whether it was new and strong or old and weakened?
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Old 08-29-13, 07:57 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by stanman13 View Post
And this will explain why they are called spoke protectors, rather than jam preventers.
The plastic dork disks I described a few posts up are precisely that, rather than spoke protectors.
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Old 08-29-13, 10:09 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by stanman13 View Post
Fair enough. It may possibly prevent a jam but I certainly wouldn't count on it. And also agreed that proper adjustment should make it a moot point. But things happen and Murphy wrote a famous law for good reason. A jammed wheel is less horrific than half your spokes cut. But then again I make no attempt to follow the "rules" at all.

Only one of my bikes came with a plastic one. After many years it got to be pretty ugly so I removed it. My bikes that have steel ones still have them. If "dork" is the worst thing I get called then I'm alright.
Please note that in all of this discussion, I have not called a spoke protector a "dork disc".

That said, look at post 8 and the discussion about a jammed wheel causing serious injury. I still believe that there were a number of factors unrelated to the use of the spoke protector that could be blamed for the injury but the poster insists that it was the cause. A jammed wheel is a sliding wheel which is harder to control so there is a some truth to his point. The stars had to align just right to cause an injury as serious as his but they did. A few broken spokes pales in comparison.
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Old 08-29-13, 10:16 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by Camilo View Post
I looked and saw that the derailleur cage was obviously leaning inward - either the hanger or the cage was bent and out of vertical alignment. When I had a chance I mentioned to her that she should get that checked out right away because she might shift into her spokes and cause a problem. The point here is that I wonder if the spoke protector she had in place would have helped in that particular instance - whether it was new and strong or old and weakened?
A bent derailer hanger is the least likely problem to benefit from the use of a spoke protector, especially if the protector is one of the plastic ones that are commonly used. Depending on how badly bent the hanger is, the lower part of the derailer arm will hit the spokes, catch on them, and bend into the spokes. I have seldom seen damage to the spokes in this kind of event as well. I've seen lots of severely pretzeled derailers and a few broken hangers but the spokes are sound.
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Old 08-29-13, 10:32 PM
  #55  
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I took off my spoke protector long ago because I feared losing status with my bike snob friends.

You guys should all remove yours too.
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Old 08-30-13, 08:23 AM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Please note that in all of this discussion, I have not called a spoke protector a "dork disc".

That said, look at post 8 and the discussion about a jammed wheel causing serious injury. I still believe that there were a number of factors unrelated to the use of the spoke protector that could be blamed for the injury but the poster insists that it was the cause. A jammed wheel is a sliding wheel which is harder to control so there is a some truth to his point. The stars had to align just right to cause an injury as serious as his but they did. A few broken spokes pales in comparison.
That post has me scratching my head a bit for a couple of reasons. I can't really say if his analysis is accurate since, you know, we're just here on the net, but some things don't seem to line up. I'm having a hard time visualizing how you could go down hard and fast if you were only riding at walking speed, but ok. Also, I've been through (and sometimes purposefully caused) quite a few rear wheel skids in my 40 years or so of riding. I've never found that to be very hard to handle. Not like a front wheel skid, right? All in all, though, I'll take the guy at his word on that stuff. I was thinking more along the lines of rear wheel collapse due to spoke failure being worse than a skid, but of course individual situations vary.
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Old 08-30-13, 09:07 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by stanman13 View Post
That post has me scratching my head a bit for a couple of reasons. I can't really say if his analysis is accurate since, you know, we're just here on the net, but some things don't seem to line up. I'm having a hard time visualizing how you could go down hard and fast if you were only riding at walking speed, but ok. Also, I've been through (and sometimes purposefully caused) quite a few rear wheel skids in my 40 years or so of riding. I've never found that to be very hard to handle. Not like a front wheel skid, right? All in all, though, I'll take the guy at his word on that stuff. I was thinking more along the lines of rear wheel collapse due to spoke failure being worse than a skid, but of course individual situations vary.
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Old 08-30-13, 01:46 PM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
A bent derailer hanger is the least likely problem to benefit from the use of a spoke protector, especially if the protector is one of the plastic ones that are commonly used. Depending on how badly bent the hanger is, the lower part of the derailer arm will hit the spokes, catch on them, and bend into the spokes. I have seldom seen damage to the spokes in this kind of event as well. I've seen lots of severely pretzeled derailers and a few broken hangers but the spokes are sound.
+1. I've seen a misadjusted RD "ding" the spokes despite the presence of a [strike]dork[/strike]spoke protector more than once.
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Old 08-30-13, 04:22 PM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by stanman13 View Post
.
I'm having a hard time visualizing how you could go down hard and fast if you were only riding at walking speed, but ok.
Hi,

Actually at a descent speed its very difficult to go down hard and fast, your
problem is is being ******** fast, by whatever cause. Conversely the worst
problem at low speed for your head is simply falling over, something I'm
very good at, (I just mess up with one foot out of the toeclips occasionally,
and there is no going back, I'm going over), and some people are bad at.

For whatever reason they get it all wrong and their head ends up bouncing
off the road, I don't understand it, my best analogy is when I fall off I just
make the best of it, like a cat and a big drop, and avoid the worst of it.

I fall off and the worst is usually a scraped knee, otherwise fine, so I
can understand the difficulty understanding that it could be a lot worse.

But FWIW bicycle helmet standards are based on simply falling over (badly).

rgds, sreten.

Last edited by sreten; 08-30-13 at 05:06 PM.
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Old 08-30-13, 04:31 PM
  #60  
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Hi,

Can't really remember what the innocuous word was , ******** ?
Which in physics has a simple meaning as does ***********.

rgds, sreten.

r*t*rd*d, r*t*rd*t**n.

Last edited by sreten; 08-30-13 at 04:42 PM.
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Old 08-31-13, 08:27 AM
  #61  
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Yeah, ***** ****** to ******* and **** always makes me ***** something ****.
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Old 11-16-21, 06:58 AM
  #62  
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With 3 major European tours, theTransAm and 35 years of commuting/utility, fixed conversion and substantial on and off road experience I'd say I've earned the self respect to not care what wannabes think of my dork discs. Complete the Pittsburgh Dirty Dozen then come criticise ny dork discs. I've got wheel spoke reflectors, too. Suck on that, snobs. Oh, and sometimes I wear mid calf wool socks and my sunglass temples on the inside of my helmet straps, too.

Last edited by GhenghisKahn; 11-20-21 at 09:08 PM. Reason: Misspelling
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Old 11-16-21, 08:41 AM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by GhenghisKahn View Post
With 3 major European tours, theTransAm and 35 years of commuting/utility, fixed conversion and substantial on and off road experience Id say I've earned the self respect to not care what wannabes think of my dork disc's. Complete the Pittsburgh Dirty Dozen then come criticise ny dork disc. I've got wheel spoke reflectors, too. Suck on that, snobs. Oh, and sometimes I wear mid calf wool socks and my sunglasse temples on the inside of my helmet straps, too.
I admire your extensive resumé and your freedom from the judgment of others. Has your spoke protector ever come into play to prevent a problem?
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Old 11-18-21, 10:47 PM
  #64  
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Campagnolo Super Leggere spoke protector w/ 13-block.
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Old 11-19-21, 06:11 PM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Let's start with the limit screw. They don't "back out". Every limit screw I've every worked with from the Suntour VGt to a Shimano XTR to a Sram XO to a Huret Simplex have all been so tight that it takes significant torque to move them. You may have messed with the limit screw or you may have pulled the cable hard enough to flex the derailer and move it into the spokes or you may have damaged the hanger in a crash but it wasn't a failure of the limit screw because the screw "backed out".

Second, walking pace is slow. You could lock up your rear wheel (aka skid) as effectively with the brake and not fall over. I'm not saying that you didn't crash but saying that it was the fault of the chain jamming in the spokes strains credulity. If you were going at a high rate of speed and overshifted into the spokes, you could skid and crash but you probably wouldn't be shifting to low gear if you were going that fast.
Low speed crashes can have deleterious consequences. His explanation may or may not be accurate but it doesn’t strain credulity one bit for me. My friend and I had a bike shop. He was working another job cleaning a restaurant late at night and somewhere in the four blocks between the restaurant and the shop he hit the back of his head, cracked his skull, was seen in the post office lobby sitting against a wall then later I found him at the shop and took him to the ER. After a couple week coma and years of recovery he kinda got better. He had absolutely no memory of the event and was only off the date by ten years. We never learned how it happened.
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Old 11-19-21, 06:19 PM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by Burton View Post
Sheldon Brown's bicycle glossery:
https://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_sp-ss.html

Never seen a properly installed spoke protector that'll let a chain drop behind the largest cog. Its possible to CREATE a potential problem by installing an oversize spacer between the spoke protector and the largest cog - but that's NOT a correct installation.
Just happened to me today. No spacer.
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Old 11-19-21, 07:51 PM
  #67  
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Is there any reason to be concerned about the moderately sharp bend in the derailleur shift cable stop?
Originally Posted by Fredo76 View Post

Campagnolo Super Leggere spoke protector w/ 13-block.
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Old 11-20-21, 12:24 AM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by Turtle Speed View Post
I took off my spoke protector long ago because I feared losing status with my bike snob friends.

You guys should all remove yours too.

Turtle Speed you hit the nail on the head. I took off my spoke protector long ago also so I wouldn't have to live in shame.
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Old 11-20-21, 09:05 PM
  #69  
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Originally Posted by BCDrums View Post
Kaaaaahn!
I admire your extensive resumé and your freedom from the judgment of others. Has your spoke protector ever come into play to prevent a problem?

Thank you for your kind words. Yes, as a matter of fact my spoke protector HAS prevented a problem. Early on in my cycling experience my limit screw fell out of adjustment in mid ride. The chain fell off, locked up my rear wheel and almost caused a spill. Fortunately, my spidey senses allowed me to come to a safe stop. Then I learned about Loctite blue from a more experienced cyclist.👍
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