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-   -   How to compare two spokes? (https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/913232-how-compare-two-spokes.html)

anga 09-16-13 06:30 AM

How to compare two spokes?
 
Hi:

Considering two spokes:
spoke 1: single butted: 2.34mm/2.0mm/2.0mm
spoke 2: double butted: 2.00mm/1.8mm/2.0mm

All else being equal, which spoke is better?

use: 26" wheel, Nexus/Alfine 8-speed hub.

Thanks

Andrew R Stewart 09-16-13 06:56 AM

The two spokes offer different possibilities that address different concerns. How about some info about the rider and their past history with wheels/spokes. Andy.

anga 09-16-13 07:04 AM

Ignore rider and past history with spokes/wheels.

reptilezs 09-16-13 07:07 AM

out of those 2 i choose double butted

anga 09-16-13 07:57 AM


Originally Posted by reptilezs (Post 16070300)
out of those 2 i choose double butted

Why?

TampaRaleigh 09-16-13 08:13 AM


Originally Posted by anga (Post 16070291)
Ignore rider and past history with spokes/wheels.

Then they are both the same equally gooder.

^(Sarcasm)

TampaRaleigh 09-16-13 08:15 AM

Ignoring the rider and spoke history is like saying: "Which is better, a Silverado or a Corvette? They're both Chevys."

AnkleWork 09-16-13 08:24 AM


Originally Posted by anga (Post 16070197)
. . .
All else being equal, which spoke is better?
. . .

Define "better."

wmodavis 09-16-13 08:33 AM

spoke 2 top of my list!

fietsbob 09-16-13 08:47 AM

Spoke 1 is heavier ..13 on the head end 14 for the rest

Spoke 2 is 14 15 14 is lighter,, better .. ? better for what ?

heavy cargo ?_ 1

if you consider the elasticity important for spoke life?_ 2

triple butt, 13 15 14 will be offering both.. theoretically.

anga 09-16-13 08:49 AM

What is "better"?
Weight and speed are not issues.
I should have been more careful: had "life of spoke" in mind when I posted.
Appreciate explanations of your answer--for my understanding.

I wanted rider info and past history to be ignored, since I am not trying to find the best spoke for me but the best spoke for IGHs on 26" wheels in terms of life.

techsensei 09-16-13 09:07 AM


Originally Posted by anga (Post 16070675)
What is "better"?
Weight and speed are not issues.
I should have been more careful: had "life of spoke" in mind when I posted.
Appreciate explanations of your answer--for my understanding.

If "life of spoke" is what you want, then get the heavier single butted spokes. But because they are heavier gauge, you won't be able to tension them as highly. In theory, you may need to true them a bit more often than if the wheel were built with the thinner double butted spokes.

joejack951 09-16-13 09:07 AM

For a rear wheel with any amount of dish, it can make sense to use a heavier gauge spoke on the drive side and a lighter gauge spoke on the non-drive side. The lighter gauge spokes will stretch more for any given tension and thus lose less tension (from their already limited tension given the wheel's dish) when weighted. By reducing the chances of the non-drive side spokes going slack you greatly reduce fatigue on the spokes and should increase spoke life as a result. So, my answer would be both spokes used together would be best.

fietsbob 09-16-13 09:09 AM

no problems with 32 straight 14, myself.. R'off and Mavic ex721 rim

FBinNY 09-16-13 09:20 AM

Which spoke considerations are more about the best balance of factors, rather than a given spoke design being flat out better.

Factors to consider are weight, strength (weight capacity), rigidity, life expectancy, and good match to the rim's strength.

Thicker spokes will increase strength, and rigidity, but at a cost in weight and depending the rim, life expectancy of the wheel.
Lighter DB spokes save weight, can provide for more life expectancy by stressing the rim less, but will always build a less rigid wheel.
Any butted spoke will reduce breakage at the elbow, with the benefit increasing with greater difference. As a general rule, you want an increase of diameter of10-15%.

Good wheel builders aren't married to one favorite spoke, but will select spokes based on purpose, number of spokes, rider weight, the specific rim, and the rider's history of wheel problems. Many, including myself, will use two different spokes in the same wheel, ie. reducing gauge on the left side to compensate for the lower max tension on that side.

IMO, the goal is to build the lightest best riding wheel that holds up.


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