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Tire inflated but...there's no valve.

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Tire inflated but...there's no valve.

Old 10-20-13, 11:00 AM
  #1  
gillang
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Tire inflated but...there's no valve.

Hi! I did fix over 300 bikes in the last 10 years. Today, I just came across a rare beast. It's an old girl(maybe 15-20 y.o.) road bike with old 26 X 1 3/8 tires and rims(kind of an odd size.You don't see them often since these rims are bigger than standard 26" mountain bike wheels). The front tire is rock hard but...there's no valve coming out of the rims. I thought...I will pierce a small hole with a needle and deflate it so I could reinstall it with the valve popping out but...doing so,there's no hair coming out and I did try real hard to have it leaked. Seems the thing is filled with some light soft solid stuff that won't leak. How do you remove from the rim a tire that is set like that?
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Old 10-20-13, 11:27 AM
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It a form fill tire , like you see on wheelchairs . To remove you need to cut it off ,if you not going to save or reuse it or soak it in very hot water to soften it up and still be a bear to remove .
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Old 10-20-13, 11:57 AM
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Cut it off with heavy duty side cutters or something similar. Those tubes are nasty annoying.
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Old 10-20-13, 12:05 PM
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Ttwo main questions are:
why are you set on removing it? Broken nipple? don't like the ride? what?
if removed, do you have any interest in reusing it?
If you have no plans on reusing it, by all means, cut it out.
If you do consider reusing it,a bit more finesse is needed.
It'd help if you'd be able to tell if it's a regular tire with an insert, or a homogenous AKA solid AKA airless AKA airfree tire. Check if there's a name on the sidewall.
Solid tires are fitted just like oversized rubber bands, they're basically stretched over the rim using something like a cross between a sturdy spatula and a tire lever. Or, if you're slightly less stubborn, through the use of a tire jack.

Either way, if properly fitted, solid tires can be quite tight, but not beyond the reach of a couple of tire levers.
Keep in mind that they're meant to be a press fit between the rim sidewalls. You have to break that free before there's space enough to get the tire levers in there. A vise grip may come in handy. Just force the tire sideways to get a gap.

If it's a regular tire with an insert, I don't have much help to offer. The bead will be forced way in under the insert, and fishing it out, and getting it back out over the rim sidewall takes a lot of force. I'd sacrifice the tire at that stage.
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Old 10-20-13, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by dabac View Post
Ttwo main questions are:
why are you set on removing it? Broken nipple? don't like the ride? what?
if removed, do you have any interest in reusing it?
If you have no plans on reusing it, by all means, cut it out.
If you do consider reusing it,a bit more finesse is needed.
It'd help if you'd be able to tell if it's a regular tire with an insert, or a homogenous AKA solid AKA airless AKA airfree tire. Check if there's a name on the sidewall.
Solid tires are fitted just like oversized rubber bands, they're basically stretched over the rim using something like a cross between a sturdy spatula and a tire lever. Or, if you're slightly less stubborn, through the use of a tire jack.

Either way, if properly fitted, solid tires can be quite tight, but not beyond the reach of a couple of tire levers.
Keep in mind that they're meant to be a press fit between the rim sidewalls. You have to break that free before there's space enough to get the tire levers in there. A vise grip may come in handy. Just force the tire sideways to get a gap.

If it's a regular tire with an insert, I don't have much help to offer. The bead will be forced way in under the insert, and fishing it out, and getting it back out over the rim sidewall takes a lot of force. I'd sacrifice the tire at that stage.
I want to remove it to reuse it on the rear wheel( the one on the rear wheel is shut and it was a regular tire with an inner tube and valve). I will use a standard 26" mountain bike wheel (that I have) for the front with a 26" road tire(that I have) that goes on such rim. I did check and the brakes will fit for that new rim size. I can't remember the name of the tire brand( and I'm not close to it right now) but it was made in Taiwan. It's also written on the side:"inflate to 65psi" so it's not a solid tire. I guess I will cut off the rim in 3 or 4 pieces and I will then be able to get it.
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Old 10-20-13, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by gillang View Post
I want to remove it to reuse it on the rear wheel( the one on the rear wheel is shut and it was a regular tire with an inner tube and valve). I will use a standard 26" mountain bike wheel (that I have) for the front with a 26" road tire(that I have) that goes on such rim. I did check and the brakes will fit for that new rim size. I can't remember the name of the tire brand( and I'm not close to it right now) but it was made in Taiwan. It's also written on the side:"inflate to 65psi" so it's not a solid tire. I guess I will cut off the rim in 3 or 4 pieces and I will then be able to get it.
The tire has one of those solid inner tubes. Like these: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Bell-26-SO...ORFLAT/4805939 They are a non-inflatable innertube that fits inside a standard tire. We HATE those when they come into our bike co-op. We just sacrifice them. They give such a harsh ride compared to a normal air tube. Not harsh in the sense like you are riding on a very hard tire but rather it feels like the tire is flat while riding it and there is much more rolling resistance.

So you have a normal tire with a solid inner tube, that is why it says inflate to 65 since normally the tire would have an air tube. I would just cut it off.

Last edited by bobotech; 10-20-13 at 12:56 PM.
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Old 10-20-13, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by bobotech View Post
The tire has one of those solid inner tubes. Like these: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Bell-26-SO...ORFLAT/4805939 They are a non-inflatable innertube that fits inside a standard tire. We HATE those when they come into our bike co-op. We just sacrifice them. They give such a harsh ride compared to a normal air tube. Not harsh in the sense like you are riding on a very hard tire but rather it feels like the tire is flat while riding it and there is much more rolling resistance.

So you have a normal tire with a solid inner tube, that is why it says inflate to 65 since normally the tire would have an air tube. I would just cut it off.
Thanks for all the information.
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Old 10-20-13, 02:30 PM
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I freakin hate those solid tire inserts. They add about 3 tons to the bikes weight, feel like you're riding with square wheels, and lead uninformed consumers into thinking that riding a bike (as opposed to a car) is extremely expensive.
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Old 10-21-13, 02:04 AM
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Originally Posted by jowilson View Post
.. They ....lead uninformed consumers into thinking that riding a bike (as opposed to a car) is extremely expensive.
Huh?

2x$17 is what - 10 gallons of gas or so? But they'll sure last a lot longer than the gas. How can that be seen as extremely expensive?
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Old 10-21-13, 02:16 AM
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Originally Posted by gillang View Post
I want to remove it to reuse it on the rear wheel .. It's also written on the side:"inflate to 65psi" so it's not a solid tire.
If you should come across a solid tire sometime, remember that it's important that the tire is a press-fit between the rim sidewalls, so moving one of those from one rim to another may not work out well if the rims are of different widths.

Originally Posted by gillang View Post
I want to remove it to reuse it on the rear wheel ...
The insert or the tire?

Originally Posted by gillang View Post
... I guess I will cut off the rim in 3 or 4 pieces and I will then be able to get it.
Well it's your choice, but I don't think I'd sacrifice a functioning rim/wheel for either a tire or an insert of questionable joy to the rider.

Depending on how hard the insert is, you may be able to lever the tire bead over the rim (during assembly the suggestion is to use plenty of WD-40) and either remove the tire non-destructively, or get good access to cut the bead.
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Old 10-21-13, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by dabac View Post
Huh?

2x$17 is what - 10 gallons of gas or so? But they'll sure last a lot longer than the gas. How can that be seen as extremely expensive?
It takes a hell of a lot more than gasoline to run a car. There's engine oil, brake pads and rotors, batteries, and that's from normal use; and assuming you don't crash often.
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Old 10-21-13, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by jowilson View Post
It takes a hell of a lot more than gasoline to run a car. There's engine oil, brake pads and rotors, batteries, and that's from normal use; and assuming you don't crash often.
... which only makes it even harder to understand why solid tire inserts would make it seem expensive to ride a bicycle.
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Old 10-21-13, 10:30 AM
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Because noobs think that flats are extremely common. They don't pull out thorns or glass when they change a flat and get another flat, over and over and over. They keep buying tubes, then go for thorn resistant tubes, those are tough to install. This is all assuming that one knows how to change a tube. If they don't, they pay a shop each of these times and it adds up to quite a bit. Eventually, they go for the solid inserts. More often than not, they give in and buy a car under the assumption they'll actually save money. That logic, isn't.
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Old 10-28-13, 09:19 AM
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Originally Posted by dabac View Post



Well it's your choice, but I don't think I'd sacrifice a functioning rim/wheel for either a tire or an insert of questionable joy to the rider.
I did remove the thing yesterday. By seeing the rust there was inside the rim, I would guess the insert was there since the bike was almost new (15-20 years ago). Now that I have the experience, I guess I could have get it out without cutting the rim but... I wanted to be 100 % sure I would save the tire ( I didn't care about the insert. It went to the trash). The other (rear) rim was missing a spoke so I took one from the one I did cut off.
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Old 10-28-13, 11:59 AM
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Originally Posted by gillang View Post
... seeing the rust there was inside the rim, . .
Well, ok, cutting out a steel rim would make sense.
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Old 10-28-13, 01:42 PM
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.. 26 X 1 3/8 tires and rims(kind of an odd size.
You don't see them often since these rims are bigger than standard 26" mountain bike wheels)
very normal EA3 wheel on many 3 speed English bikes ..

You may just not be old enough to have seen that many .. here is a few:

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...hlight=3+speed

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Old 10-28-13, 02:50 PM
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That's the size on my 70's 3-speed too

M.
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