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How's my cassette and chainrings look?

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How's my cassette and chainrings look?

Old 10-22-13, 06:50 PM
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Giga
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How's my cassette and chainrings look?

No skipping or anything but my new chain wear checking shows 0.75. Going to replace the chain (and give everything a good clean!) but not sure if the cassette/chainring needs replacing first.

How's it look?

Thanks in advance!




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Old 10-22-13, 07:32 PM
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The chainrings look fine and chainrings in general last a long time and have to be very badly worn before they cause shifting or skipping problems.

The cassette can't be evaluated by appearance unless it is dreadfully worn and yours isn't. However, it may, and probably will, skip with a new chain, particularly on the smaller few cogs. The least expensive approach is to fit the new chain first and see how it runs. If it's good, no problem, if it skips on some of the cogs, replace the cassette right away.
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Old 10-22-13, 08:46 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
However, it may,......, skip with a new chain, particularly on the smaller few cogs. The least expensive approach is to fit the new chain first and see how it runs.
+1, the only way to do this is to fit the chain and see. It'll either skip or it won't, and you'll adjust accordingly.
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Old 10-22-13, 08:50 PM
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The chain looks a bit neglected. Oiling it at a given mileage interval or after riding in the rain would definitely help with chain life.

I lube the chain on my bike about every 200 or 300 miles and wipe off excess lube before riding and every ride or two thereafter. With 2600 miles on the chain, it has barely measurable wear.

Good luck with keeping your drive train running smoothly!
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Old 10-23-13, 11:56 AM
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I got a new chain so I can avoid having to replace my drive train. Assuming the new chain does skip, would it be bad to put the old chain back on and ride it til the cassette is completely worn?
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Old 10-23-13, 12:14 PM
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My chain was stretched 1/16 inch per foot, the chain checker showed .75, but with a new chain every cog except the largest skipped.
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Old 10-23-13, 12:16 PM
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I've accidentally had chains get to 0.75 a few times, but have only had to replace a cassette (because of skipping) once, after neglecting my commuting bike over the winter. Odds are you'll be fine without skipping.

I would just run new non-skipping stuff, unless you also have a beater bike and can put the old crappy stuff on there. But if you want to just ride your worn stuff into the ground, it's your choice. Just factor in the cost of the chainrings (which are probably fine now).
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Old 10-23-13, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Al1943 View Post
My chain was stretched 1/16 inch per foot, the chain checker showed .75, but with a new chain every cog except the largest skipped.
This goes to show what I've said for years. Chain stretch is only an indicator of the chain's condition and wear age. It doesn't measure roller wear, which can often be much more significant than the pin wear shown by stretch.

Because roller wear isn't measured reliably by normal chain checking (either gadgets, or the 12" ruler), the 1/16" rule is only a guide, but not gospel.
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Old 10-23-13, 01:28 PM
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One choice is just realize the chain and cogs wear into each other and plan ; always to buy Both.

being bigger,, chainrings last longer.

[if not used daily in the woods.. single tracking and not washed down.]
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Old 10-23-13, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
...Because roller wear isn't measured reliably by normal chain checking (either gadgets, or the 12" ruler), the 1/16" rule is only a guide, but not gospel.
Some argue that roller wear is relatively unimportant. I do, but rather than do it myself, it's easier to provide a link to article on the topic:

http://pardo.net/bike/pic/fail-004/000.html
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Old 10-23-13, 02:14 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
being bigger,, chainrings last longer.
It's more than size and tooth count. Chainrings have the chain applied under tension so it can be forced into place and will stay without skipping even on teeth that are a bit worn or have slightly altered pitch.
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Old 10-23-13, 02:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Looigi View Post
Some argue that roller wear is relatively unimportant. I do, but rather than do it myself, it's easier to provide a link to article on the topic:

http://pardo.net/bike/pic/fail-004/000.html
The argument that roller wear doesn't matter is based on the illogical concept of the chain as a straight line. However the chain isn't straight when it's wound on a sprocket. As the roller wears, the chain is able to settle deeper into the roots of the teeth, effectively reducing the working diameter of the sprocket, and shortening it's pitch. The functional effect of a pitch reduction of .005" is the same as that of a chain who's pitch is increased by .005". So roller wear is as important as stretch.

BTW- eons ago before bushingless chains, the guideline foe chain replacement was 1%. Over the years it was reduced to half that.

I suspect (theory only) that this is because bushingless chains suffer a higher rate of roller wear than bushed chains. So the 1/8"/12" guideline wasn't serving and had to be reduced.
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Old 10-23-13, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
BTW- eons ago before bushingless chains, the guideline foe chain replacement was 1%. Over the years it was reduced to half that.

I suspect (theory only) that this is because bushingless chains suffer a higher rate of roller wear than bushed chains. So the 1/8"/12" guideline wasn't serving and had to be reduced.
I thought it was because freewheel (oops, cassette) teeth had gotten shorter, so the roller can't climb as high on the tooth before going over the top.
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Old 10-23-13, 05:41 PM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
I thought it was because freewheel (oops, cassette) teeth had gotten shorter, so the roller can't climb as high on the tooth before going over the top.
Possibly, except that the profile of the smallest sprockets hasn't changed much if at all. Also, the same issue affects freewheels, even vintage ones, so I doubt that the sprocket is implicated.

In any case, the important part of the post was the explanation of why roller wear is as important as pitch change (stretch).
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Old 10-23-13, 05:59 PM
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Ah, gotcha.
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Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
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Old 10-23-13, 06:44 PM
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the edges of the partial bushing and inside roller edge get the wear concentrated there ..
older, less laterally flexible full bushing chains , just had a wider contact surfaces ..
so wore longer [ particularly in IGH service ]..
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Old 10-26-13, 12:07 PM
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Bad News - It took me over three hours to install a new chain. The KMC master link was super finicky.

Good News - No skipping! Shifting has never been so smooth - every upshift and downshift is silent and quick, pretty amazing.

Thanks for the help!
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