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What parts do you grease?

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What parts do you grease?

Old 12-29-13, 12:51 PM
  #26  
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I don't know how I managed to wrench for over 20 years without using 4 different types of locktite. It's nonsensical for someone who is maintaining one or two bikes to get something specific for each use, when proper application of a marine grade grease and normal maintenance is more than sufficient. I always found that the leftover grease on my fingers after a BB OH was sufficient for the flats.
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Old 12-29-13, 01:11 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by BLYTZPK View Post
Moved the saddle over to the Redline Monodog staffing a Ritchey seat post....ahhh soft torque...but loosing the screws and washers outback isnot an idea worth smiling about so do we grease or use red locktite ?

I use blue lock on the watercage bolts (4) preventing rust and holding the bolts in.

The square taper dry application argument once went round and round and...well actually more elliptical than round. And I had a helluva time getting cranks off good dumpster frames and the Raleigh I ride. So there had to be another answer. Casual reading in Loctite info..maybe looking for the aluminum/steel info..I came across red locktite as a SEATING liquid...not holding into place locking threads but providing more flat to flat surface area for grip in a part not perfectly machined by Luigi's wife's 3rd cousin Brunello The ********.
Well, I've been doing bike mechanics for 27 years working on steel, aluminum and Ti frames and have:

1. Never used Locktite of any grade on any bolt, threaded fastener or square taper crank.
2. Never had any of them spontaneously loosen or fall out.
3. Never had a water bottle bolt rust or loosen despite only using grease on the threads.

What am I doing wrong?
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Old 12-29-13, 02:26 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Well, I've been doing bike mechanics for 27 years working on steel, aluminum and Ti frames and have:

1. Never used Locktite of any grade on any bolt, threaded fastener or square taper crank.
2. Never had any of them spontaneously loosen or fall out.
3. Never had a water bottle bolt rust or loosen despite only using grease on the threads.

What am I doing wrong?

Although I don't have your vast experience, I haven't had a problem either. I merely grease the threads and torque them by feel. I did lose some bolts when I was a kid, but not since (although I did strip a few threads in the learning process). I can sort of see why one would do on a rack for touring, but in reality, I would probably safety-wire them before I loctited them, or even add an extra nut to the bolt. I don't see the need for loctite on a bike.
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Old 12-29-13, 05:57 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by hillrider View Post
well, i've been doing bike mechanics for 27 years working on steel, aluminum and ti frames and have:

1. Never used locktite of any grade on any bolt, threaded fastener or square taper crank.
2. Never had any of them spontaneously loosen or fall out.
3. Never had a water bottle bolt rust or loosen despite only using grease on the threads.

What am i doing wrong?
you're pissing into the wind
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Old 12-29-13, 06:57 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by BLYTZPK View Post
you're pissing into the wind
You could think of it as "dodging raindrops," too!
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Old 12-29-13, 07:41 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by ironwood View Post
I think you should grease the spindle and crank as they are dissimilar metals and in the presence of moisture will "weld" to each other, preventing removal.
Definitely! Not only for that reason, but dry bearing surfaces on the spindle can be a source of clicking as they bind, then slip. I use Phil's for this.
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Old 12-30-13, 06:52 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by GeneO View Post
Definitely! Not only for that reason, but dry bearing surfaces on the spindle can be a source of clicking as they bind, then slip. I use Phil's for this.
What causes aversion to Locktite ? Is WD-40, white grease addictive ? Is their use rooted in a deeply held tradition or oractice ?

Any grease in a spindle is dumb. Grease holds water. The refiner does not eliminate water, too costly, unnecessary. Who would complain ? taper riders ? extinct !

Surface area there is produced for binding the components together with acceptable torque...grease reduces the design capacity. Loctite increases the design capacity.
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Old 12-30-13, 08:37 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Absolutely! The myth that square taper flats should not be greases is wrong! For reasons they never explained, Campagnolo always recommended cranks be dry fit but that's mechanically a mistake.
I knew my comment would garner some opposite views. Even claiming the dry technique is wrong, with exclamation point ….for "reasons never explained".

So, with respect, please add some detail and/or evidence as to why it is wrong. I can only go by my personal experience and I'm sure your's is probably lengthier and perhaps more extensive than mine so, some empirical evidence would be appreciated. Thanks. BTW, this request is in no way casting aspersions on your undoubtedly vast knowledge as a mechanic.

As to the reasons Campagnolo recommended dry fit crank, who knows? But I suspect they know a bit about the metallurgy of aluminum alloys and perhaps they thought their vast experience precluded the need to explain themselves. Not sure.

I can only go by personal experience, which is somewhat limited, admittedly. And, based on the way I learned things, which could be wrong of course. But the dry fit method, given aluminum's somewhat natural lubricity, always worked for me.

Galvanic corrosion can certainly develop in dissimilar metals, especially between aluminum and steel, but it requires other factors to be present to develop. Moisture is one, of course. Oil is another. But I won't pretend vast scientific knowledge that I may have just learned on Wikipedia.

As an anecdote, I just a couple weeks ago removed a TA crank from a bike that had been built in 1974 and which had obviously never been serviced or taken apart in its 39 year life. And which had been stored in questionable conditions for many years. All the lubricants were petrified and some bearing surfaces were toast. The crank came right off, was dry as a bone, and there was no evidence of corrosion at all. Just one example, of course.

I like to learn. Teach me. But please, without unsubstantiated claims as are many in that J. Brandt article.
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Old 12-30-13, 08:44 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by BLYTZPK View Post
What causes aversion to Locktite ?
No aversion, it's just unnecessary for nearly any bike application.

Originally Posted by BLYTZPK View Post
Any grease in a spindle is dumb. Grease holds water.
What? This is absurd.
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Old 12-30-13, 09:23 AM
  #35  
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I should add to the above that while I know a mechanic who has disassembled, say, a thousand bikes will undoubtedly find evidence of galvanic corrosion in a certain percentage of crank/spindle interfaces that have not been lubed. But he will also find a certain percentage that show no evidence of corrosion.
I guess my contention is that one will find none, in a properly maintained bike.
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Old 12-30-13, 09:29 AM
  #36  
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What, something's wrong with grease now? Funny, I never noticed. Loctite and whatnot is for problem-solving.

Nothing wrong with grease on square taper flats either IME. +1 Jobst torque readings aren't worth a damn without grease.

Actually, tell you what's wrong with grease - having too much of it. Remember, there's only a microscopic film where it's working; the rest is for circulation and protection. Some folks like to replace all the air inside their hubs with grease, but a thick fillet in each cup is all that's needed IMO; it'll get on the balls when you put em in and all over the cones too. For a pedal thread or something, a small dollop smeared onto the start of the thread will get smeared all the way along it.

If you don't over-lube your bike, you don't need to clean it so comprehensively when you work on it, and the residual grease left on threads and such is all you need next time around.

Last edited by Kimmo; 12-30-13 at 09:34 AM.
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Old 12-30-13, 10:11 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by BLYTZPK View Post
What causes aversion to Locktite?
Simplicity and years of experience. As stated before there is no reason at all to recommend Loctite when one already has perfectly suitable grease available. The rest of the post is simply inaccurate.
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Old 12-30-13, 03:00 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by cny-bikeman View Post
Even for friction shifter cables grease can actually ****** movement, especially in low temps. It's better to use a heavy oil such as Phil Waterproof.
That's the stuff I use to grease my cables. Phils waterproof grease. the stuff in the green tube.
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Old 12-30-13, 04:45 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
I knew my comment would garner some opposite views. Even claiming the dry technique is wrong, with exclamation point ….for "reasons never explained".

So, with respect, please add some detail and/or evidence as to why it is wrong. I can only go by my personal experience and I'm sure your's is probably lengthier and perhaps more extensive than mine so, some empirical evidence would be appreciated. Thanks. BTW, this request is in no way casting aspersions on your undoubtedly vast knowledge as a mechanic.

As to the reasons Campagnolo recommended dry fit crank, who knows? But I suspect they know a bit about the metallurgy of aluminum alloys and perhaps they thought their vast experience precluded the need to explain themselves. Not sure.

I can only go by personal experience, which is somewhat limited, admittedly. And, based on the way I learned things, which could be wrong of course. But the dry fit method, given aluminum's somewhat natural lubricity, always worked for me.

Galvanic corrosion can certainly develop in dissimilar metals, especially between aluminum and steel, but it requires other factors to be present to develop. Moisture is one, of course. Oil is another. But I won't pretend vast scientific knowledge that I may have just learned on Wikipedia.

As an anecdote, I just a couple weeks ago removed a TA crank from a bike that had been built in 1974 and which had obviously never been serviced or taken apart in its 39 year life. And which had been stored in questionable conditions for many years. All the lubricants were petrified and some bearing surfaces were toast. The crank came right off, was dry as a bone, and there was no evidence of corrosion at all. Just one example, of course.

I like to learn. Teach me. But please, without unsubstantiated claims as are many in that J. Brandt article.
I agree with Rootboy. I don't routinely lube the square tapers, but I'm a bit of a messy builder, so I may have lubed a few though messy hands. Bought a parts bike today ('83 Schwinn World) and the crank (yes only one) came off with no effort. It may depend on your climate and proximity to salt spray from the ocean.
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Old 12-30-13, 05:53 PM
  #40  
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The dry method:

Campy went for lightness, low mating surface area, and I suspect in feudal labor conditions produced a sometimes odd set of mates. Thus a dry method worked best....lacking the surfacing effects of red locktite stillborn.

Time allotted this afternoon went to refreshing the rear brakes on the Redline. The bosses were covered with Finish Line SilGrease 6 years ago over rustoleum. Still in there. The brakes turn housing get FL dry lube, refreshed before a trip.

Woods' grease was formulated by a chemist Woods hired for this purpose.
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Old 12-30-13, 05:59 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Greased:

Cup-and-cone hub bearings
Cup-and-cone bottom bracket bearings
Cup-and-cone headset bearings
Bottom bracket cup threads.
Any and all threaded bolts (like water bottle bolts, derailleur mounting bolts, brake mounting bolts, etc.)
Seatposts.
Quill stems.
Pedal threads.

I use Phil Grease but lots of others work just as well.
I agree with the exception of "seatposts". The Trek manuals for my wife's bike and my bike say to not grease seatposts in carbon fiber frames. I don't lubricate seatposts in CF frames and I've never had one get stuck.

I would add pedal bearings to the "do" grease list.
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Old 12-30-13, 06:02 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Bandrada View Post
I also use it on my pedals and thru axles.
+1
Pedal bearings do need grease and are often overlooked.
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Old 12-30-13, 06:15 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Al1943 View Post
+1
Pedal bearings do need grease and are often overlooked.
I have rarely greased my pedal bearings. More often than not, the mechanism itself will fail before I ever get around to maintaining the bearings. I do use anti-seize on the threads once or twice a year, though. Not much, but just enough to coat the first few threads, and I change my pedals quite often between clip-in and platform.
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Old 12-30-13, 06:16 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by scoatw View Post
That's the stuff I use to grease my cables. Phils waterproof grease. the stuff in the green tube.
I actually meant Phil Tenacious (oil) not grease. The tight clearances in lined cable housing can result in grease causing too much drag.
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Old 12-30-13, 06:57 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by Al1943 View Post
I agree with the exception of "seatposts". The Trek manuals for my wife's bike and my bike say to not grease seatposts in carbon fiber frames. I don't lubricate seatposts in CF frames and I've never had one get stuck.
Yeah, carbon seatposts are an exception. The usual recommendation is carbon "friction paste" for those who have problems with the seatpost slipping. Actually no seatpost needs much attention if you remove, clean and reinstall it every few months. The horror stories we hear usually start out; " I just got this bike that has sat for XX years and the seatost is REALLY stuck.....". That said, I always grease my aluminum posts.
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Old 12-31-13, 12:10 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by Bandrada View Post
I have rarely greased my pedal bearings. More often than not, the mechanism itself will fail before I ever get around to maintaining the bearings. I do use anti-seize on the threads once or twice a year, though. Not much, but just enough to coat the first few threads, and I change my pedals quite often between clip-in and platform.
Just grease the bearings on the pedals you want to keep.
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Old 12-31-13, 07:26 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Al1943 View Post
Just grease the bearings on the pedals you want to keep.
yeah, pedal shaft threads: outstanding place for RED Loctite. Holds pedal, prevents rusting, loosens with heat and stepping on vicegrips holding open end wrench, holds correct torque.

Linseed the butt end for rustproofing.
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Old 12-31-13, 07:48 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by Al1943 View Post
Just grease the bearings on the pedals you want to keep.
TIMES are a little difficult to get at, otherwise I'd be all over it.
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Old 03-25-14, 10:46 PM
  #49  
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For the sake of creating a new forum, I will ask here. I bought a new base allez 5 months ago and I was wondering when is the right time to lube my brake and shift cables. I live in Florida and normally ride on trails and sometimes on local roads. For safety reasons, I never ride in wet conditions other this ONE time when I was caught in the rain. Braking and shifting aren't having any issues but just want to know when I know lube them before problem exists.
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Old 03-25-14, 11:16 PM
  #50  
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Lest it freeze in place,. pull and re grease the aluminum stem and seatpost. annually ..
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