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What parts do you grease?

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What parts do you grease?

Old 12-27-13, 05:22 PM
  #1  
PapaGanoosh
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What parts do you grease?

I'm curious what parts need to be greased. I'm planning to do a thorough cleaning on a bike (eg., take it apart, wipe down, put it back together) and so this information would be helpful.

A list of the parts that should be greased/should not be greased would be nice. I only have alloy/steel components so don't have to worry about carbon parts. I know the seatpost should be greased and generally when there is metal to metal contact. How about little screws into metal parts (eg., stem, seatpost adjustment bolts, etc) and say the threading where you screw in the pedals to cranks? But I was also told the bb spindles and crank arms should never be greased. Any other parts?

Also, is it fine if I use Shell Alvania extreme pressure lithium grease vs a bike specific grease?
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Old 12-27-13, 05:36 PM
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Greased:

Cup-and-cone hub bearings
Cup-and-cone bottom bracket bearings
Cup-and-cone headset bearings
Bottom bracket cup threads.
Any and all threaded bolts (like water bottle bolts, derailleur mounting bolts, brake mounting bolts, etc.)
Seatposts.
Quill stems.
Pedal threads.

I use Phil Grease but lots of others work just as well.

Last edited by HillRider; 12-27-13 at 06:07 PM.
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Old 12-27-13, 05:38 PM
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I generally apply thin coat of grease to just about any contact surface, with the exception of the press fit spline (if I can avoid it). I try to avoid tearing down my bike completely just for the sake of doing it because it puts unwarranted wear and tear on fasteners and such. When something breaks or needs tuning, which unfortunately is not a very rare occurrence for me, I then will do a thorough tune of that particular mechanism, and/or any of the parts associated with said repair. Every once in a while I'll add some tri-flo to fork wipers and cycle it to remove buildup. But, I always try to remove as much of the excess tri-flo when I'm done.

Any waterproof grease will work. I like Red Devil all-purpose.

Last edited by Bandrada; 12-27-13 at 05:42 PM.
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Old 12-27-13, 05:41 PM
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+1 on what HillRider said , and on any treaded bolts in a Quill stems and inside of the steering tube . Use a light oil like triflo on spokes & nibbles so it easier to true the wheels when needed.
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Old 12-27-13, 05:55 PM
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Would take too long to compile a list, and there's more to consider than grease. Taking a bike apart just to do it is not a good idea - better to address specific specific problems. Get some in-person assistance (bike co-op?) or go to sheldonbrown.com to learn more.
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Last edited by cny-bikeman; 12-28-13 at 03:59 PM.
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Old 12-27-13, 07:56 PM
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I know others will disagree but I am of the school that believes bottom bracket spindle flats to aluminum crank tapers should never be lubricated, so you've got that right, as far as I'm concerned. Light film of grease on nearly every other fastener or moving part. Except chain.
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Old 12-27-13, 08:28 PM
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I like a thin film of anti-seize on threaded fasteners.
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Old 12-27-13, 08:41 PM
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If you have a cassette, remember to put a light but noticeable coat of grease on the freehub body prior to installing the cassette. Many a squeak that was (incorrectly) attributed to BBs, cranks, seatposts, etc had been caused by this common oversight.
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Old 12-28-13, 03:32 PM
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I think you should grease the spindle and crank as they are dissimilar metals and in the presence of moisture will "weld" to each other, preventing removal.
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Old 12-28-13, 03:50 PM
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Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
I know others will disagree but I am of the school that believes bottom bracket spindle flats to aluminum crank tapers should never be lubricated, so you've got that right, as far as I'm concerned. Light film of grease on nearly every other fastener or moving part. Except chain.
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/i...ng-cranks.html
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Old 12-28-13, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by ironwood View Post
I think you should grease the spindle and crank as they are dissimilar metals and in the presence of moisture will "weld" to each other, preventing removal.
I put a little anti-seize in the situation of dissimilar metals.
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Old 12-28-13, 05:06 PM
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Absolutely! The myth that square taper flats should not be greases is wrong! For reasons they never explained, Campagnolo always recommended cranks be dry fit but that's mechanically a mistake.

BTW, anti-seize is certainly effective on all threaded fasteners but is extremely messy and is over-kill for most uses. I've used it on bottom bracket cups but that's about all I'm willing to put up with it.
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Old 12-28-13, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Absolutely! The myth that square taper flats should not be greases is wrong! For reasons they never explained, Campagnolo always recommended cranks be dry fit but that's mechanically a mistake.

BTW, anti-seize is certainly effective on all threaded fasteners but is extremely messy and is over-kill for most uses. I've used it on bottom bracket cups but that's about all I'm willing to put up with it.
I also use it on my pedals and thru axles. A little goes a long way and is more resistant to the elements than grease.
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Old 12-28-13, 08:55 PM
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Only bearings. Only bearings. The bike system, After Lance, sophisticates with spinoffs from racing/airplanes/locks/computers. Better Living Thru Chemistry,

Silicone grease.

Rear deray pulley wheels are plain bearings....a good synthetic boat trailer wheel bearing grease.

Grease attracts and holds grit into a grinding compound so these areas are mostly sealed or an attempt was made. Shimano seals are excellent.

Non rotational and relatively infrequently used 'sliding joints' such as brake mechanism pivots, cables/housings/grips/shifters get a dose of Teflon and wax, Finish Line Dry Lube used here as this FL is an effective loosening agent in the style of the maligned WD-40.

Dripping a few drips into the end of a cable housing tilted so the drips run DOWN into the housing always loosens the entire cable run: very effective. FLDL used on lock hasps, sliding mechanisms, and yes experimentally, the chain is incomparable AFAIK.

Grease coming with a new chain, factory grease, in a warm climate is to be enjoyed while it lasts. Be careful to NOT run thru the sand pile for a few miles after installation for enjoying this wonder grease job. You may regrease a chain but doing this effectively is a PITA.

Bolts are not greased. Large bolts are fixed in place with Blue Locktite. Unstressed small bolts such as water cage bolts also Blue Loc. Small bolts under pressure and having a low surface area such as deray pulley wheel bolts, Red Locktite. BB threads, blue locktite with the end gap sealed off from water with a painting of linseed oil. You can do tis with the watercage bolts but its looked at as too compulsive.

The seat post is lube with a delightful mix of linseed oil and aluminum anti-seize. The seat post is a plain bearing.

Last edited by BLYTZPK; 12-28-13 at 09:11 PM. Reason: duh
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Old 12-28-13, 09:12 PM
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Hopefully not a derail here, but I'm tending to the wheels on an older Schwinn Tempo I gave myself for Christmas and wondering about greasing the bearings. Specifically, how much grease is ideal? Is there such a thing as too much? (Obviously, if it's spilling out of the hub there's an issue. But short of that?)

Glad I took it apart like you guys always recommend, btw. The old grease looked like ear wax pulled from a corpse.
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Old 12-28-13, 09:28 PM
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I grease my cables inside the cable housing. They work better in sub-freezing temperatures.
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Old 12-28-13, 09:30 PM
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What about the bolts/screws around the brake pads and brake lever, and the washers of the brake pads? Should they be lubed?
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Old 12-28-13, 10:02 PM
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Originally Posted by J.Oxley View Post
Hopefully not a derail here, but I'm tending to the wheels on an older Schwinn Tempo I gave myself for Christmas and wondering about greasing the bearings. Specifically, how much grease is ideal? Is there such a thing as too much? (Obviously, if it's spilling out of the hub there's an issue. But short of that?)
I add a lot of grease to cup-and-cone wheel bearings, bottom brackets and headset bearings. I'll put a heavy ring of grease into the hub race to hold the bearing balls in place as I add them, then add another bead of grease on top once the balls are in place. Finally, I put a thin layer of grease on the cones before assembling.

Overkill? Sure but the excess does no harm and will leak out for the first ride or two and form a seal to keep out water and dirt. I just wipe it off the exterior a couple of times. The only downside is I use up grease faster than absolutely necessary but grease is cheaper than metal.
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Old 12-28-13, 10:10 PM
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Thanks, HillRider. If that's overkill, I think my front wheel (which I did before thinking to post) is right about at regular kill.
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Old 12-29-13, 07:58 AM
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further, taper/square plain bearings could be greased but Red Loctite does not attract water, does not evaporate and is designed as a seating compound for this type plain bearing. Red Lock will seat beer can shims into a tapered plain bearing.
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Old 12-29-13, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by scoatw View Post
I grease my cables inside the cable housing. They work better in sub-freezing temperatures.
ALWAYS grease friction shifter cables before late fall
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Old 12-29-13, 08:16 AM
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Originally Posted by BLYTZPK View Post
further, taper/square plain bearings could be greased but Red Loctite does not attract water, does not evaporate and is designed as a seating compound for this type plain bearing. Red Lock will seat beer can shims into a tapered plain bearing.
I think you recommend Locktite for way too many applications where it is not needed or warranted. Water bottle cage bolts? Really? it should never be necessary to Locktite square taper cranks or their fastening bolts in place. Properly torqued they should never come loose unless the crank is damaged already.

Also, be careful which Locktite you use and color is not a sufficient definition. There are many grades of the same color varying widely in strength and the stronger ones require heat to break the bond.
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Old 12-29-13, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by BLYTZPK View Post
ALWAYS grease friction shifter cables before late fall
Even for friction shifter cables grease can actually limit movement, especially in low temps. It's better to use a heavy oil such as Phil Tenacious.
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Old 12-29-13, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
I think you recommend Locktite for way too many applications where it is not needed or warranted.

Also, be careful which Locktite you use and color is not a sufficient definition.
+1
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There's no such thing as a routine repair.

Don't tell me what "should" be - either it is, it isn't, or do something about it.

If you think I'm being blunt take it as a compliment - if I thought you were too weak to handle the truth or a strong opinion I would not bother.

Please respect others by taking the time to post clearly so we can answer quickly. All lowercase and multiple typos makes for a hard read. Thanks!
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Old 12-29-13, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
I think you recommend Locktite for way too many applications where it is not needed or warranted. Water bottle cage bolts? Really? it should never be necessary to Locktite square taper cranks or their fastening bolts in place. Properly torqued they should never come loose unless the crank is damaged already.

Also, be careful which Locktite you use and color is not a sufficient definition. There are many grades of the same color varying widely in strength and the stronger ones require heat to break the bond.
Moved the saddle over to the Redline Monodog staffing a Ritchey seat post....ahhh soft torque...but loosing the screws and washers outback isnot an idea worth smiling about so do we grease or use red locktite ?

I use blue lock on the watercage bolts (4) preventing rust and holding the bolts in.

The square taper dry application argument once went round and round and...well actually more elliptical than round. And I had a helluva time getting cranks off good dumpster frames and the Raleigh I ride. So there had to be another answer. Casual reading in Loctite info..maybe looking for the aluminum/steel info..I came across red locktite as a SEATING liquid...not holding into place locking threads but providing more flat to flat surface area for grip in a part not perfectly machined by Luigi's wife's 3rd cousin Brunello The ********.

Last edited by BLYTZPK; 12-29-13 at 12:46 PM. Reason: removed 'the'
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