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Tight bike chain (Won't bend)

Old 02-21-14, 08:51 AM
  #26  
HillRider
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Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
the op has gotten closer to the shelbroco method than any other non parody bike mechanic
I was thinking the same thing. A little more work and he could have accomplished just what Sheldon recommended.
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Old 02-21-14, 12:34 PM
  #27  
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I just got a new KMC X8.99 Chain and it is entirely slathered with factory grease making it likely to be very prone to catching dust and dirt as well as being quite sticky to the touch.

Wiping with a dry towel doesn't effectively get off all the grease. What is the best way to get out this factory grease and use my own lubricant for it?

With the ShelBroCo method, it's probably a good idea only for old model chains where finding a replacement is difficult. But on newer model chains, it's probably a good idea to get a new chain entirely if the current chain has gotten to a point where one has to take it apart entirely to clean the entire thing.

Last edited by j814wong; 02-21-14 at 12:42 PM.
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Old 02-21-14, 12:43 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by j814wong View Post
I just got a new KMC X8.99 Chain and it is entirely slathered with factory grease making it likely to be very prone to catching dust and dirt.

Wiping with a dry towel doesn't effectively get off all the grease. What is the best way to get out this factory grease and use my own lubricant for it?
Dampen the rag with kerosene or mineral spirits and wipe off the excess exterior lube. The use the lube of your choice on the exterior. Do not soak the chain in solvent as you don't want to washout the interior lube.

As a poster said here recently; "more chains are killed with excess kindness than by modest neglect".
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Old 02-21-14, 01:50 PM
  #29  
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On the box or in the instructions, or maybe in the KMC video I watched, KMC recommends leaving their lube on as long as possible, claiming it is better than anything available to consumers. They should know.

I use a scrubber with water based degreasers on my older chains. They work fine afterwards. They don't have to last forever. Just lube thoroughly after cleaning. For my casual, weekend use, the chain doesn't have to be perfect, the cassette will eventually wear out, but it takes so long that it doesn't matter if I have to invest an extra $100 on the bike every few years from premature wear. My time is worth a lot more than that.
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Old 02-21-14, 08:42 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by j814wong View Post
With the ShelBroCo method, it's probably a good idea only for old model chains where finding a replacement is difficult. But on newer model chains, it's probably a good idea to get a new chain entirely if the current chain has gotten to a point where one has to take it apart entirely to clean the entire thing.
i fear you may be missing the point of the shelbroco chain cleaning method

it was only a joke
and should never be attempted by anybody on any type of chain
new or old
for several main reasons i can think of
including
ridiculously excessive effort
the fact that a chain weakens every time you push the pin out
and the fact that modern multi speed chains cannot be properly reconnected with the original pin

the most hilarious thing about the shelbroco chain cleaning method
is that there are three 'kits' available
one includes a chain tool along with degreaser and grease and q tips

and the one for shimano chains has everything in the first kit
along with 114 shimano replacement pins

and the sram kit includes 57 quick links

if you really dont believe all the advice above that excessive cleaning does more harm than good to your chain
and think there might be some situation where complete chain disassembly is a good way to clean it
then you dont need to discuss this with bike mechanics
you need to discuss it with your psychiatrist
because the meds for your ocd need to be adjusted
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Old 02-21-14, 09:01 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
NB: if lots of current derailleur chains are shortened ,

they have a failure potential at each place that pin was pressed out.

Just take a bit off only the end to get the right length then join with a Quick Link .
A new chain would be less expensive for the original poster.

Master links are at least $2 each when you buy on-line in quantity (like a full card of 6 KMC Missing Links) which is $18 to put together 8 chain segments. Purchased singly the number would be more like $27 and I shudder to contemplate LBS prices.
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Old 02-21-14, 09:01 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
i fear you may be missing the point of the shelbroco chain cleaning method

it was only a joke
and should never be attempted by anybody on any type of chain
new or old
for several main reasons i can think of
including
ridiculously excessive effort
the fact that a chain weakens every time you push the pin out
and the fact that modern multi speed chains cannot be properly reconnected with the original pin

the most hilarious thing about the shelbroco chain cleaning method
is that there are three 'kits' available
one includes a chain tool along with degreaser and grease and q tips

and the one for shimano chains has everything in the first kit
along with 114 shimano replacement pins

and the sram kit includes 57 quick links

if you really dont believe all the advice above that excessive cleaning does more harm than good to your chain
and think there might be some situation where complete chain disassembly is a good way to clean it
then you dont need to discuss this with bike mechanics
you need to discuss it with your psychiatrist
because the meds for your ocd need to be adjusted
Well, i honestly had no clue that it was any bit a joke.

Now that I scroll down... "This page was a joke"
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Old 02-22-14, 04:12 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by j814wong View Post
Regarding the rusting and corrosive part, your comment also apply to not soaking any bike part including chainrings and cassettes in Simple Green?

Is there a better chemical that I can use to wash the bike and soak some things with non-moving parts (cassettes and chainrings) to loosen the gunk and grease? Pure water isn't great at washing off grease.
For general bike-washing, I use the same soap as I wish my car with. For cleaning chains, if you want to use a water-based degreaser, there are a lot of options, including specific chain-cleanrs available at bike shops or online. When I have to soak parts, I use kerosene, and reuse it. The nasty bits settle out if you let it set a while.
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Old 02-22-14, 07:51 AM
  #34  
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I have a wipperman(sic) SS chain- 5000 miles-
I hose it when it gets dirty or gunked up with grass -then lube it with whatever thin spray oil I have at hand(every 6 months or so)
I really hate that black gunk that chain lubes seem to eventually produce-
and the lube/grit Gunk grinds away at the gears and derailleur

Next time I'll see if I can find a no lube chain
I wonder if any of the teflon coated chains are no lube-(guessing not-teflon probably not on bearing surfaces)
you would think that extremely hard smooth metal on hard smooth metal would be adequately smooth-
low friction-but I guess not-contact area is so tiny.

Why no NO LUBE chains?
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Old 02-22-14, 07:58 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by phoebeisis View Post
you would think that extremely hard smooth metal on hard smooth metal would be adequately smooth-low friction-but I guess not-contact area is so tiny.

Why no NO LUBE chains?
Because hard smooth metal on hard smooth metal is not low friction. There are O-ringed motorcycle chains that seal the lube into the pivots and require no extra lube for life but the friction from the seals and extra bulk would be totally unacceptable for bicycle use.
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Old 02-22-14, 10:19 AM
  #36  
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Yeah-figured as much-
I have had many many motorcycles-so O-ring some not
and for absolute efficiency the unsealed chains delivered more power-but didn't last as long
The Teflon chains-don't actually teflon the bushings right-not tough enough yet

Sintered metal bushings were used for a while I think-supposed to absurd lube-so you rarely had to lube-not sure if they are still in use-they didn't really catch on- maybe they wore to fast or were higher friction?

Yeah I am a crank in respect to chain lube-hate that black gunk-touch it-ruins clothes-
Maybe I will strip my chain completely-see how it feels-how long it lasts
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Old 02-22-14, 11:21 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by j814wong View Post
Regarding the rusting and corrosive part, your comment also apply to not soaking any bike part including chainrings and cassettes in Simple Green?

Is there a better chemical that I can use to wash the bike and soak some things with non-moving parts (cassettes and chainrings) to loosen the gunk and grease? Pure water isn't great at washing off grease.
Chainrings and cassettes (if removed from the freehub body) can be cleaned in Simple Green, dish soap or anything you wish. The problem with any water-based cleaner is when it gets into inaccessible places and isn't washed out and thoroughly dried. So you don't want to use it to soak a chain unless you are very careful to completely dry the chain, inside and out. That usually requires heat and time.

For removing grease and crud, mineral spirits (real mineral spirits, not the new "green" type) or kerosene work very well and won't leave oil displacing water behind.
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Old 02-22-14, 12:05 PM
  #38  
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In Lennard Zinn's book on road bike maintenance and repair, he said that if your chain ends up particularly dirty one could put the chain in in a water bottle with a little solvent then shake the bottle but don't keep the chain in there to soak.
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Old 02-22-14, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by j814wong View Post
In Lennard Zinn's book on road bike maintenance and repair, he said that if your chain ends up particularly dirty one could put the chain in in a water bottle with a little solvent then shake the bottle but don't keep the chain in there to soak.
The "solvent" he was referring to was one or another petroleum solvent like kerosene, mineral spirits, VM&P Naphtha, etc. Not water or water+ detergent.
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