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Rim faliure?

Old 03-15-14, 03:28 PM
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Rim faliure?

So today I was out riding and it was quite windy so I couldn't hear anything but the wind. Once the wind calmed down, I heared a 'rubbing' noise when using my front brake. So I thought it was just a simple barb on the brake track, nothing a quick sand couldn't fix. But when I took a closer look I noticed that the noise came from the seam of the rim passing the brake pads. So I checked my back wheel to see if I could see the seam on the brake track a easy as I could on the front. In the back I couldn't see nor feel the seam where as in the front I could see and feel it. It seems to me that the seam has come apart, but nothing major, only like a tenth of a milimeter or less. So here's my question, does this affect the stength of the wheel in a big way or is it safe to ride after a quick sand to get rid of the noise? Or should I simply take it to my LBS? Since the bike is less than 7 months old and still under waranty. Note that the 'opening' is very tiny and maybe not even worth the hassle.

Thanks
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Old 03-15-14, 03:42 PM
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Since it is under warranty, you should take it back. It's quite possible that the wheel was built with insufficient spoke tension or that the rim is defective.
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Old 03-15-14, 04:11 PM
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Sadly many rims are made that way. My guess / without seeing it / that you can remove it with sanding that spot with sand paper / I'm guessing again it's an aluminum rim /. Just double check for crack...If there is any, even small one - take the rim to your LBS for warranty replacement.
Post a pic of that area and rim name. Some veterans would love to see it to share their valuable opinions.
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Old 03-15-14, 04:46 PM
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Originally Posted by lopek77
Sadly many rims are made that way. My guess / without seeing it / that you can remove it with sanding that spot with sand paper / I'm guessing again it's an aluminum rim /. Just double check for crack...If there is any, even small one - take the rim to your LBS for warranty replacement.
Post a pic of that area and rim name. Some veterans would love to see it to share their valuable opinions.
Well that'll be kind of a problem since it's all so tiny it'll be hard to get a decent picture.
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Old 03-15-14, 04:58 PM
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rolled and pinned rims have a seam , if there' a bump. file it down smooth.
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Old 03-15-14, 05:02 PM
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So I gave the pictuers a go. Hope they help.

So here's the first one, the seam on the black part on the back wheel isn't as obvious

The line acros the brake track is simply non existent on the other wheel.

EDIT: the wheels are dt swiss ra 2.0, probably a renamed set specially made for cube
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Old 03-15-14, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by chil2makefun
Well that'll be kind of a problem since it's all so tiny it'll be hard to get a decent picture.
Yeah, I know what you saying. Take a closer look and decide by yourself. Sanding that spot is ok on steel or aluminum rims. Use 220 grit paper, ride some and then take a look again.
If you feel same rubbing noise/feeling after sanding it again - your rim may be cracked.
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Old 03-15-14, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by chil2makefun
So I gave the pictuers a go. Hope they help.

So here's the first one, the seam on the black part on the back wheel isn't as obvious

The line acros the brake track is simply non existent on the other wheel.
You did it! Good job, awesome close ups. It looks EXACTLY the same as on many other rims. Annoying, but nothing to worry about.
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Old 03-15-14, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by lopek77
You did it! Good job, awesome close ups. It looks EXACTLY the same as on many other rims. Annoying, but nothing to worry about.
So just a quick sand and ready to go?
Sorry if this was a silly thread but the over-cautious me was... wel cautious
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Old 03-15-14, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by chil2makefun
. . . The line acros the brake track is simply non existent on the other wheel. . .
Looks exactly like a pinned joint, not cracked. Maybe no permanent fix; even if sanded smooth it can shift again.
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Old 03-15-14, 05:35 PM
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What kind of rim is this? Many modern rims are welded and the sidewalls machined for a uniform braking surface. This is a fairly recent development, though: the traditional means of closing a rim was a plug that held the ends together. Sometimes the edges of the joint don't quite line up, creating the effect you describe. Since this is a front wheel, you can just turn the wheel around so that the joint passes under the pads in the opposite direction. Sometimes this is enough. Or you could do as fietsbob suggests and file it smooth. Or simply be patient until the brake pads themselves eventually do this for you.
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Old 03-15-14, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by chil2makefun
So just a quick sand and ready to go?
Sorry if this was a silly thread but the over-cautious me was... wel cautious
Yes...quick sand and it should be fine. Recheck it at some point. There is no "silly threads". Forum is here to ask for whatever you want to know.
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Old 03-15-14, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork
Looks exactly like a pinned joint, not cracked. Maybe no permanent fix; even if sanded smooth it can shift again.
Yes, the OP's rim looks to be pinned rather than welded. But if the spokes are properly tensioned, the joint should not shift even in the absence of the pin.
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Old 03-15-14, 05:40 PM
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson
What kind of rim is this? Many modern rims are welded and the sidewalls machined for a uniform braking surface. This is a fairly recent development, though: the traditional means of closing a rim was a plug that held the ends together. Sometimes the edges of the joint don't quite line up, creating the effect you describe. Since this is a front wheel, you can just turn the wheel around so that the joint passes under the pads in the opposite direction. Sometimes this is enough. Or you could do as fietsbob suggests and file it smooth. Or simply be patient until the brake pads themselves eventually do this for you.
The bike, including the wheels, is less than 7 months old so it's probably welded.

Originally Posted by lopek77
Yes...quick sand and it should be fine. Recheck it at some point. There is no "silly threads". Forum is here to ask for whatever you want to know.
Thanks for the help.
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Old 03-15-14, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by chil2makefun
The bike, including the wheels, is less than 7 months old so it's probably welded.
Your pictures look to be of a pinned rim. This isn't a bad thing: there's no strength difference between pinned and welded rims, and the lack of machining on the brake track means more material to wear through before you need to replace the rim.
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Old 03-15-14, 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson
... the traditional means of closing a rim was a plug that held the ends together. Sometimes the edges of the joint don't quite line up, creating the effect you describe. Since this is a front wheel, you can just turn the wheel around so that the joint passes under the pads in the opposite direction....
+1

Rims have been pinned since the advent of hollow aluminum rims. The cumulative spoke tension keeps the rim under compression and holds the joint closed, so there was never a need to weld. These joints rarely move except in major events which force the entire wheel seriously out of true.

So if this is a change from before, as opposed to being this way all along, odds are you reversed the wheel at some point, and reversing it back will solve the problem.

In any case, consider the issue to be like a shingled roof. You want to have the wheel so the brake shoes go down the step in the right direction.
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Old 03-16-14, 05:43 AM
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson
Yes, the OP's rim looks to be pinned rather than welded. But if the spokes are properly tensioned, the joint should not shift even in the absence of the pin.
Originally Posted by FBinNY
+1Rims have been pinned since the advent of hollow aluminum rims. The cumulative spoke tension keeps the rim under compression and holds the joint closed, so there was never a need to weld. These joints rarely move except in major events which force the entire wheel seriously out of true.
Not to mention the steel or kevlar tire beads that hold the whole assembly together while you ride.
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Old 03-16-14, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by chil2makefun
The bike, including the wheels, is less than 7 months old so it's probably welded...
New or recent doesn't suggest it is welded. Plenty of new rims are not.
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Old 03-16-14, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by chil2makefun
The bike, including the wheels, is less than 7 months old so it's probably welded.


Thanks for the help.
Not necessarily. Even today the majority of the rims I see are "pinned." Nothing at all wrong with this joining method. Just do as others have suggested and flip the wheel in the fork.
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Old 03-16-14, 11:49 AM
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My mistake, thought welding was the more recent method. On the bright side, a little sand with a 180 grid did the trick. Now there's only a little noise left, which will be taken care of by my brake pads. Thanks again for giving me peace of mind that my rims will not fail on me.
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Old 03-16-14, 12:05 PM
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My brand new Mavic rims that I built up recently were of pinned construction. You did right, sand till smoother or flip wheel and call it a day.
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Old 03-16-14, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson
Yes, the OP's rim looks to be pinned rather than welded. But if the spokes are properly tensioned, the joint should not shift even in the absence of the pin.
Good point. To the OP: I'd try reversing the wheel per FB or, at a maximum, consider having spoke tension checked. I'd probably not sand the rim.
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Old 03-16-14, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork
Good point. To the OP: I'd try reversing the wheel per FB or, .....
Thanks for the credit, but John T. suggested it first.
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