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Rebuilding Shimano m324 Pedals

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Rebuilding Shimano m324 Pedals

Old 05-30-14, 06:13 AM
  #1  
mrFreel
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Rebuilding Shimano m324 Pedals

I have a set of Shimano m324 pedals that have developed "play". The worst thing about this is that the left one also "clicks" due to the play and seems to be amplified by the bikes carbon frame. I have checked and they are tight in the cranks. The play is definitely the pedal on its axle shaft. I believe these have cartridge bearings. Am I correct that they cannot be adjusted? Or is there something I can do to fix them?

Mike
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Old 05-30-14, 07:05 AM
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These are no fun to work on. The bearings are minute, and loose-not cartridge, and a very thin-walled socket is required, along with the plastic tool that allows the knurled plastic ring to be held in a vise. Good luck.
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Old 05-30-14, 07:09 AM
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Thanks, this may be a good time to upgrade and just use these on an older bike.
Mike
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Old 05-30-14, 07:15 AM
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Originally Posted by mrFreel View Post
Thanks, this may be a good time to upgrade and just use these on an older bike.
Mike
Yes, those pedals are so inexpensive they are not really worth doing repairs to. BTW, Nashbar has excellent prices on Shimano's PD-M780 "XT-level" pedals, which would be a significant upgrade and a great weight savings if you don't require the one flat side the M324's have.
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Old 05-30-14, 07:15 AM
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Those pedals use loose bearings - not cartridges - and can be overhauled or have play eliminated. It tends to be time consuming and challenging without a special Shimano socket tool though. And if the bearing cups or cones are damaged - which I suspect they are if it's clicking - getting replacements may be difficult. Many shops will just try to sell you new pedals.
That said, you can take them apart yourself to find out. Leaving the pedals attached to your bike, remove the cages (Shimano calls them "plates") by unscrewing the 4 screws holding them in place. Pry the plastic cap off the now exposed end of the body with a small screwdriver or equivalent. This exposes the locknut and cone that retain the bearings. Make sure your work area is well-lit and you have a tray or something under the pedal to catch any tiny parts that drop out. Unscrew the locknut with a socket wrench, then unscrew the cone with some needle-nose pliers. The tiny bearings should now spill out all over the place and the body will come away from the axle.
Clean up any grease or crud inside the body and on the cone and axle with a rag, and inspect for damage - pitting, cracks, rust, etc. Replacement parts can usually be ordered through your local shop, or you could try contacting Shimano directly - I haven't wrenched in awhile so I don't know what their policy regarding consumer-direct small parts is anymore. Buy all new 3/32" bearings - there's no point re-using old ones when wear is so difficult to detect and new ones are so cheap. You may as well buy a bag of 100 from a bearing supplier - which is usually the cheapest way to go.
Now comes the challenging and tedious part. Pack the cones in the hub body with enough fresh grease to hold the tiny bearings in place when they're pushed into it, but not so much that you can't see what you're doing. Carefully slide the body onto the axle and twist a little to seat the bearings onto the race, then carefully remove the body to inspect their positioning to make sure none are out of place or there are any significant gaps between them where more bearings can be added. (Should be 14 bearings closest to the crank, and 17 on the other side.) After repeating this procedure for the outside race, thread the cone back onto the axle just enough to snug up against the bearings you just installed - using the needle-nose pliers helps when your fingers run out of room. Then thread the locknut on. You ideally want to set the cone so that it eliminates all play, but doesn't load the bearings enough to cause binding - which is tricky without that special Shimano tool I mentioned earlier. Carefully snug the locknut down and test for play or binding. You can do it with just the pliers and a socket, but it requires some patience, dexterity, and trial and error. Once you're happy with it, push the dust cap back in, bolt the cage back on, and repeat everything with the other pedal. (Remember: small bolt/nut = small torque.)
Here's a diagram and parts list for your pedals: http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/te...9830608609.pdf
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Old 05-30-14, 08:06 AM
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If you can find the tool then just adjust the preload on the bearing. You can regrease by pushing grease through the housing with your fingers.
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Old 05-30-14, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by davidad View Post
If you can find the tool then just adjust the preload on the bearing. You can regrease by pushing grease through the housing with your fingers.
Yes, assuming the bearing balls and/or races haven't been damaged and pitted by rust or other problems.
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Old 05-30-14, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Yes, assuming the bearing balls and/or races haven't been damaged and pitted by rust or other problems.
I doubt you could find parts for them anyway. That's why I though the minimum would suffice.
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Old 05-30-14, 10:09 AM
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Thanks for all the ideas and the step by step process
mike
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Old 05-30-14, 12:42 PM
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There is a sub assembly that you unscrew from the pedal body with a plastic spline tool .. you may be able to get a replacement for that .

I havent tried .. you could be spending as much as a new pair of pedals cost ..
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Old 05-30-14, 02:22 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
There is a sub assembly that you unscrew from the pedal body with a plastic spline tool .. you may be able to get a replacement for that .

I havent tried .. you could be spending as much as a new pair of pedals cost ..
the M324 doesn't have that axle cartridge and the out-board cone and locknut are recessed making adjustment difficult.
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Old 05-30-14, 10:29 PM
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Ray Hosler posted a video of an M520 pedal rebuild. Not sure if enough is in common to transfer to the M324, but might be worth a look:

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