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Chain tug on with a 3-speed internal hub?

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Chain tug on with a 3-speed internal hub?

Old 06-29-14, 09:30 PM
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Chain tug on with a 3-speed internal hub?

I was fixing a stranger's bike (got a pinch flat) on a group ride recently and saw a chain tug for the first time. Apparently this is a device meant to tension the chain and, some are saying, center the wheel relative to the dropouts. I certainly like the idea. Question is, would it work on my bike? I ride a Windsor Oxford which has horizontal dropouts and a Shimano Nexus internal 3-speed hub.
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Old 06-29-14, 09:50 PM
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it may. you may want to check that if and when you buy one that it is compatible with your axle. specifically, it's diameter. mine (not cheap) would work with a smaller diameter, but not larger.
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Old 06-29-14, 09:57 PM
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No.
chain tugs only fit bikes with track ends, - like a horizontal dropout where the slot faces the rear of bike

also chain tugs are not needed to center a wheel or hold tension, thats what the axle nuts are already doing
if you have a slipping axle something is wrong
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Old 06-30-14, 03:02 AM
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I'm not fan of chain tugs at all. The very name suggests my objection.

The proper chain tension for a single speed or IGH drive is no tension, or the chain needs to be slack with about 1/4" free vertical play in the center of the lower loop. Devices like chain tug encourage over tightening of the chain, and even if used properly fix a wheel slippage problem that shouldn't exist anyway.
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Old 06-30-14, 04:47 AM
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They're a PITA, but a proven quick and dirty fix if you have mashed dropouts or crappy gear made out of cheap steel that won't bite.

Although you really should ensure the axle is secured properly by nuts or skewer, the chain is generally the first cause of the wheel moving by a long shot; it sorta works.
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Old 06-30-14, 10:04 AM
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Hm, mixed reviews eh? I am not sure about why these are only appropriate for track ends either, I have seen them on dropouts like mine (perhaps inappropriately).

FWIW my intended application was to (if possible) use this to help center the wheel up properly, as people say it does that. On my bike I find, perhaps because the dropouts are goofy, I'm not sure, the wheel always wants to angle to the drive side a bit whenever I am getting it reinstalled. I can usually work it back into place by moving the axel around but a simple solution would have been nice.
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