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Will my current tube be compatible with new tire?

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Will my current tube be compatible with new tire?

Old 08-03-14, 07:59 AM
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Will my current tube be compatible with new tire?

I ordered a 700 x 23 Conti 4000s and I'm wondering if I need to also buy a new inner tube. My current tire is a 700 x 32 so the inner tube is probably designed for 25 to 32mm tires. Also, my rim is 23mm in width.
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Old 08-03-14, 08:24 AM
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You won't know how big your inner tube is until you remove the old tire. If it is sized to fit a 32mm wide tire you may have trouble stuffing it into a 23 mm wide tire. I hope that the 700 x 23 tire works out for you, when I originally built up my touring bike I used the 700 x 23 tires that were on the wheels I transferred from a previous commuter. The ride was so punishingly harsh that I soon switched to 700 x 30' s and later to the 700 x 32 tires that are now on the bike
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Old 08-03-14, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
You won't know how big your inner tube is until you remove the old tire. If it is sized to fit a 32mm wide tire you may have trouble stuffing it into a 23 mm wide tire. I hope that the 700 x 23 tire works out for you, when I originally built up my touring bike I used the 700 x 23 tires that were on the wheels I transferred from a previous commuter. The ride was so punishingly harsh that I soon switched to 700 x 30' s and later to the 700 x 32 tires that are now on the bike
I actually plan on changing only the back tire for now and see how it goes. Psi has a lot to do with comfort as well so I could try lowering it if it's too uncomfortable. But yes the best way to check inner tube size is to remove the tire. I just didn't want to do it until the new tire arrives since it's a new bike and don't wanna mess with it too much. I guess my question is if it's possible to use an inner tube designed for (say) 28-32mm tires on a 23mm tire.
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Old 08-03-14, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by apexball View Post
I actually plan on changing only the back tire for now and see how it goes. Psi has a lot to do with comfort as well so I could try lowering it if it's too uncomfortable. But yes the best way to check inner tube size is to remove the tire. I just didn't want to do it until the new tire arrives since it's a new bike and don't wanna mess with it too much. I guess my question is if it's possible to use an inner tube designed for (say) 28-32mm tires on a 23mm tire.
It is possible, but 700 X 18/23 Tube would be best.
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Old 08-03-14, 09:18 AM
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Originally Posted by apexball View Post
I actually plan on changing only the back tire for now and see how it goes. Psi has a lot to do with comfort as well so I could try lowering it if it's too uncomfortable. But yes the best way to check inner tube size is to remove the tire. I just didn't want to do it until the new tire arrives since it's a new bike and don't wanna mess with it too much. I guess my question is if it's possible to use an inner tube designed for (say) 28-32mm tires on a 23mm tire.
If I were going to change only one tire to a narrower size, it would be the front, not the back. You can only lower tire pressure so much before you start running into pinch flats, the narrower the tire, the higher the pressure you need. It would be interesting to know what bike you have and what you hope to achieve by going to tires so much narrower. Wider tires can actually have less, not more rolling resistance than narrow tires, all other things being equal. That is one reason why road bikes are often now being equipped with wider tires than was common even a couple of years ago. I switched from 700 x 23 to 700 x 25 tires on my road bike last year and the ride quality improved immensely with no noticeable increase in rolling resistance. In fact, I would say that on bad road surfaces my wider tires have less resistance than the narrower ones did
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Old 08-03-14, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
If I were going to change only one tire to a narrower size, it would be the front, not the back. You can only lower tire pressure so much before you start running into pinch flats, the narrower the tire, the higher the pressure you need. It would be interesting to know what bike you have and what you hope to achieve by going to tires so much narrower. Wider tires can actually have less, not more rolling resistance than narrow tires, all other things being equal. That is one reason why road bikes are often now being equipped with wider tires than was common even a couple of years ago. I switched from 700 x 23 to 700 x 25 tires on my road bike last year and the ride quality improved immensely with no noticeable increase in rolling resistance. In fact, I would say that on bad road surfaces my wider tires have less resistance than the narrower ones did
Yes it was lower rolling resistance I was aiming for but also some reviews I read on my bike suggested getting different tires for a more comfortable ride. My bike is a diamondback steilacoom 2014 with Kenda Small Block 8 tires. I wanted to replace the rear tire since that's where most of the weight falls and is where I want the better and supposedly faster tire. I plan on leaving the 700x32 front tire for better control. I did read about slightly wider tires having lower rolling resistance but I had already ordered the conti 23 tire and I got it for a lower price than they usually cost. I suppose I could replace my front tire with a 25 later on.
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Old 08-03-14, 01:12 PM
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Originally Posted by apexball View Post
Yes it was lower rolling resistance I was aiming for but also some reviews I read on my bike suggested getting different tires for a more comfortable ride. My bike is a diamondback steilacoom 2014 with Kenda Small Block 8 tires. I wanted to replace the rear tire since that's where most of the weight falls and is where I want the better and supposedly faster tire. I plan on leaving the 700x32 front tire for better control. I did read about slightly wider tires having lower rolling resistance but I had already ordered the conti 23 tire and I got it for a lower price than they usually cost. I suppose I could replace my front tire with a 25 later on.
By going to tires as narrow as 23mm you are certainly not going to improve comfort, particularly if that narrow tire is on the back. Looking at your bike, I would not go with a tire that narrow, I would opt for about a 28mm tire. You are wrong thinking that your wide tire will give you better control if it is in front, unless you are riding off road. On pavement, a smooth tread tire will grip far better than the tires you have now, so put your new tire in front, not in back
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Old 08-03-14, 01:18 PM
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Marked sizes and fit guides are very inconsistent. You want the unstretched diameter of the tube to be slightly smaller than the tire so, on paper, this will be too wide. But you can measure. The unstretched diameter of the tube is roughly equal to 2/3rds of the flat width. (twice the flat width = circumference, which divided by 3 = the diameter). For a 23mm tire, I'd consider a flat width of about 30mm the max.
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