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Rear derailleur shifting performance, smoothness on campagnolo lines

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Rear derailleur shifting performance, smoothness on campagnolo lines

Old 08-04-14, 08:50 PM
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ricefarmerr
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Rear derailleur shifting performance, smoothness on campagnolo lines

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Last edited by ricefarmerr; 02-03-15 at 06:05 AM.
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Old 08-04-14, 08:57 PM
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There's very little difference in shift performance between the various Campy derailleurs until you get near the very bottom.

Besides status and looks, more money buys lighter weight, and some more durability (maybe) at critical wear areas.
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Old 08-04-14, 09:36 PM
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Originally Posted by ricefarmerr View Post
hm..... In a blind test, using super record shifter in all cases.

1 - Can the rider tell the difference between shifting with a super record rear derailleur and shifting with an athena rear derailleur?

2 - Can the rider tell the difference between shifting with a super record rear derailleur and shifting with a chorus rear derailleur?

3 - Can the rider tell the difference between shifting with a super record rear derailleur and shifting with a record rear derailleur?
Why don't you perform those tests yourself and report the results?
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Old 08-04-14, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by ricefarmerr View Post
If I could, I wouldn't be asking those questions now would I?
As I said earlier, there's little difference. In a blind test most riders wouldn't be able to tell.

I was a Campy tech for a number of years and only bought Chorus, which gave me 99% of the function of Record for about 1/3rd less.

As a practical matter, things like the chain would have much more impact (still very little) on shift performance than the RD models, and probably the age of the chain, along with changes in chain oil or the condition of it, would make a greater difference yet.

Don't focus on the tiny differences in shifting (if any) focus on what actually makes the bike go. After all, shifting comprises a tiny fraction of riding time and effort, and has nearly zero effect on rider performance.

Spending according to your budget and buy stuff to ride, not so pricey that you'll cry if anything happens to it.
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Old 08-04-14, 10:49 PM
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You're racing, and not on a sponsored team. So unlike the pros, you're footing any bills out of pocket.

In your shoes, I'd buy the Athena, and ride something I could afford to lose. My rule about bikes and cars has always been to ride/drive something I could enjoy without worrying. I see others who have so much invested, either in $$$ or emotion, that they're constantly worried. I can't live that way.

It's sort of a shame that you can't have someone, sub the Athena without you knowing, since knowing can make you think it's somehow different.
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Old 08-05-14, 12:16 AM
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Originally Posted by ricefarmerr View Post
Thank you for your patient and explanation.

I have currently have mechanical super record groupo on my road bike. Of course I had a crash in a recent crit, and broke my rear derailleur hanger. The RD was also banged up. I don't want to replace the RD with another super record version, because I know I will crash again sometime down the road. So I'm looking into getting the cheapest version of the RD that doesn't severely hurt shifting performance. I wanted to go with athena because it's "silver" :-), but I wasn't sure if going that low down the line would have a lot of negative performance impact.

You said that chorus gives you 99% of what record provide, what number would that apply to an athena rear derailleur then ?

Can I tell a difference if I replace the SR RD with an athena RD, given all else is equal?
The Athena RD does not have the same return spring force as CH, RE and SR. It's optimised to work with PowerShift, not Ultrashift.

This does not normally give an issue so long as cable runs are reasonably straightforward. Internal cabling or cables that run through the 'bars, however, sometimes need the extra 250g of "pull" that the higher RDs provide to get a really slick up-shift to the "harder" gears, especially under load.

Generally we recommend Athena as a good entry group for leisure and serious leisure riders, Chorus as the entry point for racing.

Bear in mind, as we head into 2015, that the new 2015 CH, RE and SR RD and shift levers ca't be used with older 11s parts (all the pull rations have changed), so you need to make sure that you are buying a 2015 CH rear derailleur if you are going that way ...

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Main UK Campagnolo SC
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Old 08-05-14, 02:53 AM
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Robbie McQuin a dominant, retired, sprinter on a pro tour team, was interviewed one day during the tour and was asked about his bike. He was riding Mirage shifters. At the time 4 down the campy line. Speak volume of the fai h campy has is there product line.
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Old 08-05-14, 04:17 AM
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Originally Posted by ricefarmerr View Post
Ahh ha, Thank you SOOO much. Just the exact explanation that I was looking for. Also thank you for the warning, I am aware of the new 2015 groupo. drool ! :-)

Any how, since you brought up another topic, "return spring force". I'm quite new at this, so sorry if my questions can be quite long and frustrating to answer.

I could be totally wrong, so correct me if I'm wrong. Based on my understanding, for shifting in the rear, when I use my thumb to shift, this will shift me into a "harder" gear. In this situation, the cable is being loosen, so that the RD can spring into the "harder" gear. In order for the RD to go into the "harder" gear, this is where the "return spring force" concept comes into play, is that correct? There must be a correct return spring force for the RD to spring back into the "harder" gear. Now over time, does this force gets weaker? If this force does get weaker over time, what are some options to correct it? Can you replace the spring? Can the RD be rebuilt? Or do you just replace the entire RD? And on average, how long, millage wise do you need to replace the RD? I understand that the last questions can be difficult to answer because that depends on the rider and his/her riding style.


Thanks.
You are correct with the function of the return spring on the RD. As gfk_velo said, Athena uses PowerShift (single upshift per press) versus UltraShift for Chorus and up (multiple upshifts per press), therefore the spring doesn't need to be as strong because the RD only needs to move by one cog. IMO, if you're not fond of doing multiple upshifts in one go, you may not notice that at all. But if you do, the shifting may feel a little sluggish.

The RD is rebuildable and the spring replaceable. One cannot give a 'mileage' limit for spring replacement. A better indicator of wear on the RD spring would be number of shifts, but that would be an impossible number to ascertain due to individual riding styles and the terrain that the rider encounters.

IME, I haven't needed to replace springs on any of the RDs I have used. I have a 20+ year old Shimano RX100, and an unknown age Suntour (can't remember the model). Granted I've used friction shifting on the RDs before and then moved them over to STIs later (which is a one upshift per click as well), I haven't seen a noticeable change in shifting up to now.

Last edited by e_guevara; 08-05-14 at 04:30 AM.
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Old 08-05-14, 04:46 AM
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Originally Posted by velorider562 View Post
Robbie McQuin a dominant, retired, sprinter on a pro tour team, was interviewed one day during the tour and was asked about his bike. He was riding Mirage shifters. At the time 4 down the campy line. Speak volume of the fai h campy has is there product line.
Don't you mean Robbie McEwen? And it was Centaur shifters that he rode on way back in 2008.

From VeloNews:
Robbie McEwen forgoes an 11-speed bike on the Tour’s first stage
The sprint star opts for the new 10-speed Centaur shifters
Read more at Robbie McEwen forgoes an 11-speed bike on the Tour's first stage. - VeloNews.com
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