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135mm/142x12 hub questions

Old 08-10-14, 09:30 AM
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135mm/142x12 hub questions

I have some [dumb] questions regarding 135mm and 142x12mm hubs. I know the 142x12 TA is essentially a 135mm hub, and I've read that there are "conversion" kits to make a 135mm QR hub into a 142x12 TA. Can I have a wheel built with a 135mm QR hub and use the appropriate kit to use the wheel in bikes with both a 135mm and a 142x12 TA spacing? If it is indeed possible, how difficult is it to switch back and forth?
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Old 08-10-14, 09:47 AM
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You need to have a compatible hub, like Mavic, Hope etc, you can't do it with hubs which weren't designed for it, which includes all current Shimano hubs. For changing, with a compatible hub, it will just be a case of removing the adapters not required, and fitting those which are, depending on hub, some will need more work than others.
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Old 08-10-14, 02:21 PM
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Without regard to the specifics, here's something to consider anytime you think of sharing wheels in frames with different axle spacing.

When you widen a hub you have 2 basic choices, neither of which is ideal.

You can add some spacing to both ends to preserve the center plane, but that means your cassette will be farther from the right dropout, and some derailleurs may not reach. Plus you won't get the benefit of the added width in terms of reduced dish.

Or

You can add all the space to the left, optimizing the cassette position with respect to the right side, but you're rim will be offset to the right, and redishing is called for.

IMO- if this is an occasional thing in a pinch, the first choice is better because it's simpler. But if it's a permanent move to a wider frame, the second is the smart way, but it's more work and you can't go back.

If neither choice is a clear winner for you, accept the limitations involved, keep the wheels with their respective bikes and save the dough for something else.
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Old 08-10-14, 03:27 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY
Without regard to the specifics, here's something to consider anytime you think of sharing wheels in frames with different axle spacing.

When you widen a hub you have 2 basic choices, neither of which is ideal.

You can add some spacing to both ends to preserve the center plane, but that means your cassette will be farther from the right dropout, and some derailleurs may not reach. Plus you won't get the benefit of the added width in terms of reduced dish.

Or

You can add all the space to the left, optimizing the cassette position with respect to the right side, but you're rim will be offset to the right, and redishing is called for.

IMO- if this is an occasional thing in a pinch, the first choice is better because it's simpler. But if it's a permanent move to a wider frame, the second is the smart way, but it's more work and you can't go back.

If neither choice is a clear winner for you, accept the limitations involved, keep the wheels with their respective bikes and save the dough for something else.
The whole point of adapters for specific hub is that none of these issues exist; you can only get adapters from hub manufactures for their hubs, and for their hubs which are designed to work as either spec, you can't just take a hub which isn't designed to be converted, and just stick spacers on it, that's not how that it works. For example with a Hope Pro 2 Evo, where you have to change the axle as well as the ends, on Mavic, you add adapters to the ends.

The RD reach is not an issue, the dropout & setup take care of that, there is no change in the dishing, as the hub shells are the same for 135mm & 142mm, and for spacers, these are added to both sides.
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Old 08-10-14, 03:36 PM
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Originally Posted by jimc101
....

The RD reach is not an issue, the dropout & setup take care of that, there is no change in the dishing, as the hub shells are the same for 135mm & 142mm, and for spacers, these are added to both sides.
Got it. Yes, nothing material changes because the extra 3.5mm are pocketed into the dropouts, and the wheel is essentially the same as a 135mm.
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Old 08-10-14, 04:20 PM
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Thank you all, I now have some idea of what I am looking for and what questions to ask manufacturers. Two hubs I'm considering are a PowerTap 135mm MTB hub, which I think I can reasonably assume will not involve swapping axles due to the nature of the design, and a W.I. (if I remember right) MI6, both of which I believe use the 3.5mm spacers.

Edit: Scratch adapters for the MI6, requires an axle swap. Not a big problem, just not as easy as I made it sound. [shoulder shrugging emoti...]

Again thank you.

Last edited by LastKraftWagen; 08-10-14 at 04:34 PM.
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