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Kevlar bead tires: is there a trick to mounting?

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Kevlar bead tires: is there a trick to mounting?

Old 09-24-14, 01:50 PM
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Kevlar bead tires: is there a trick to mounting?

I mounted a new kevlar-bead tire last night; it took me half an hour. It flopped around, unlike steel-bead tires, didn't 'grip' the rim. Is there a trick to doing it more easily? If I buy them ahead of time will setting them out and weighing them down approximating how they will be when mounted help? I have an old rim: should I mount a tire on it to prepare it?

This is a thick tire with a puncture-resistant layer (Panasonic RiBMo PT), which may have made it more difficult, but I have hassled with not-so-thick kevlar-bead tires in the past.
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Old 09-24-14, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by RandomTroll
I mounted a new kevlar-bead tire last night; it took me half an hour. It flopped around, unlike steel-bead tires, didn't 'grip' the rim. . .
No idea what that means.


Originally Posted by RandomTroll
. . . Is there a trick to doing it more easily? If I buy them ahead of time will setting them out and weighing them down approximating how they will be when mounted help? . . .
Translation?


Originally Posted by RandomTroll
. . . I have an old rim: should I mount a tire on it to prepare it? . . .
Prepare it for what? Mount it to prepare it for mounting?
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Old 09-24-14, 02:09 PM
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the trick is to get the bead in position in one place
then work in both directions simultaneously
using both hands
until your hands meet and you push the remainder of the bead on with your thumbs
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Old 09-24-14, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork
No idea what that means.



Translation?
Squdgy fez blank jimp crwth vox.



Originally Posted by AnkleWork
Prepare it for what? Mount it to prepare it for mounting?
For virgin sacrifice.
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Old 09-24-14, 02:44 PM
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Unless it's a tubeless tire, which needs to be tight to the bead seat so you can inflate, there's no trick. They mount just like any tire, though many can be very tight.
\
Here's some hints.

1- mount one side first, which will establish some shape. As Will said, start in one place and keeping some tension on it, slide your hand down pushing the tire forward and over the rim until the end, then force over with thumbs or you palm as you usually do.

2- inflate tube to shape but not stretched, insert valve in rim, lift tire over and stuff the rest all the way around. make sure the valve is straight, or shift the tire and/or tube around until it is. At this point the tube should be over the rim and the second bead should be resting against the side of the rim.

3- let some air out of the tube, but not all, and start pushing the tire over the rim OPPOSITE the valve, working in both directions toward the valve. You need to push the tire toward the middle of the rim to get some slack, and need to push the tire forward toward the valve as you work so all the slack you can muster is pushed toward the finish. Often it's necessary to let the rest of the air out of the tube, and repeat the pushing to middle and forward in both directions. You want to end up with only about 6" of tire unmounted before hitting resistance. Then it's just a matter of hand strength.

4- finish by pushing the valve in to pull out any tube trapped under the bead, then back out to seat the valve. Pump to 20 psi and check/correct for even seating based on no wiggle when you shin the wheel and/or by watching the molded reference line just above the rim's edge.

Here's a last trick for "floppy" kevlar bead tires. Jam the wheel against a counter top or bench either by the axle or the far side, and hold it there with your belly. That frees both hands for working the tire.
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Old 09-24-14, 03:01 PM
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Originally Posted by RandomNonsense
Squdgy fez blank jimp crwth vox. . .
More of the usual OP.
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Old 09-24-14, 05:08 PM
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I lay the tire flat on the floor. Then I inflate an inner tube enough to give it shape and install it into the tire. Lastly I insert the valve stem in the rim, work oneiside of the tire onto the rim, then the other.

Incidentally, I install wire bead tires the same way but they're a little easier to do because they're already formed in shape.
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Old 09-24-14, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier
the trick is to get the bead in position in one place
then work in both directions simultaneously
using both hands
until your hands meet and you push the remainder of the bead on with your thumbs
Exactly. Here's what I've learned to do. It works with all tires, but is about the only way I can get a tight tire on a rim:

Get one bead on the rim, all the way around. The "floppy" kevlar bead tire gets into shape once you get one of the beads onto the rim.
Put the tube into the tire with a little air in it.

The tricks from here are: (1) start on the second bead on the side of the rim opposite to the valve and (2) seat the beads in tight as close to the center of the rim as possible. So...

Start on the opposite side of the tire from the tube valve
Get the second bead in the rim and work your way both ways around the rim toward the valve
When it starts getting close to the valve, it gets tighter of course. At some point you might reach the limit of how far you can go.

At that point go back to the starting point and squish the beads close together, as close to the center of the rim as possible. Work this around the tire as far as you can. Pull and press the tire down into the rim so the beads really get down into the center of the rim. The idea here is that if your beads run around the rim on the center point, that's the smallest circumference of the rim. If the beads are near the edges of the rim, the circumference is larger and the tire will naturally be tighter and harder to mount. As you get those beads really seated in the center of the rim, you'll see that the tire loosens up significantly around to the point where it got too tight initially, and you'll get much closer to the end point (at the valve).

Then you can go back and do it again until you think you've reached the limit of how much you can get out of that technique.

At that point, working on each side of the valve, use your thumbs and roll the bead onto the tire a tiny bit at a time. You should be able to get it to pop over completely at this point - again working in small bits.

If you can't, carefully use a tire lever or two to get the last few inches of the bead over the rim. Be careful not to pinch the tube.
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Old 09-24-14, 10:05 PM
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Originally Posted by BrainNotWork
More of the usual OP.
Another non-constructive anti-contribution from respondent.
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Old 09-24-14, 10:11 PM
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Originally Posted by RandomTroll
Squdgy fez blank jimp crwth vox.




For virgin sacrifice.
lol
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