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Converted to single chainring, seeking related help for preventing chain throw

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Converted to single chainring, seeking related help for preventing chain throw

Old 11-12-14, 12:08 PM
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Tailor
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Converted to single chainring, seeking related help for preventing chain throw

I got sick of dealing with a front derailleur I almost never use, and it was in the way of my chainboard (which I mostly love so I don't have to do special things to my pants for the commute).

Its a FSA mega exo or something like that, and I took off the two smaller rings, moved the big ring to the middle, and its been trouble free.


Until this morning, when in 20 below wind chill it decided to throw the chain halfway through my ride. This is why I only mostly love my chainboard. In that very cold weather, I finally managed to get the chain back on (It had thrown outward probably from my upshifting, and was wedged between the chainring and chainguard pretty tightly.) So in any case, I got it back on and made it to work without losing any fingers. However, I realized that I never want that to happen again.

So,

First, can the old derailleur be put back on to prevent this. Seems reasonable, but I do not wish it to shift, so I am assuming I'd need to just use the limiters to position it in place. Is there anything else I need to do to make that setup right? ( a particular height or distance from the chainring).
Second, would I be better off looking for a chainring that's not meant for a front derailleur? I'm led to believe that those "grip" or more solidly interface with the chain better and are harder to throw. If my current one can work, I don't really want to replace it.

Or, do I need to buy a chain guide, and if so, I seek recommendations for cheap but effective methods to prevent losing the chain off the front ring, either in the form of products or methods.

Also, while I'm thinking about it. Any recommendations for ways to fully or mostly enclose a drivetrain with coroplast or something similar would also be appreciated?

Lastly, moderators, if this isn't the correct place, please feel free to move it where it belongs.
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Old 11-12-14, 12:31 PM
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Yes the old ft der could be reinstalled and if the range screws were able to be positioned just so the der will act as a chain guide.

Yes a chain ring that is not designed for shifting ease will better hold a chain.

If you do make a chain case to enclose the drive train please don't bring the bike to my shop for service and expect us to deliver it back in the same condition as was dropped off in. Not meant as a dig but home made guards often aren't designed with simple removal and reinstalling in mind or have the durability to do so. I have had this discussion a number of times over the years with the customer often not understanding why we have to charge more $ to work with/around their home made thing and even with that extra care/cost the thing might not be exactly like it was originally.

One more option which I, admittedly, have little experience is to use one of the new "clutched" rear ders. These have a design that helps to limit the pulley cage from pivoting and allowing the chain to slap about. Andy.
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Old 11-12-14, 12:55 PM
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You could look into the Race Face (I think?) narrow/wide chainrings, since I have read good things about them. I am building a bike with one, because it does seem like a good idea to prevent the chain jumping.
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Old 11-12-14, 02:04 PM
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Consider adding one of these? Chain Keepers from Paul Component Engineering


the post below is one of the several offered . there is also a under the fixed cup Mount version rather than around the seat tube.

Last edited by fietsbob; 11-12-14 at 02:14 PM.
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Old 11-12-14, 02:05 PM
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This is not the cheapest, but it or something similar should do the job. Chain Keeper from Paul Component Engineering
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Old 11-12-14, 06:00 PM
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I changed my bike to a 1X a year ago. Even with a track type crankset and correct bottom bracket with chainline to the center cog, my chain jumped sometimes. I installed a Paul keeper and it works great. It's not compatible with most chainguards, but you might find one that will fit over it, or you may be able to modify one to do so. There are other brands of chain keepers, but most have a similar design.

Last edited by Cross Creek; 11-12-14 at 06:26 PM.
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Old 11-12-14, 06:42 PM
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A single speed chain ring will probably solve your problem. Shorten your chain to the minimum correct size.
A narrow wide chain ring is better if you don't mind spending the money -they are amazing.
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Old 11-12-14, 09:57 PM
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What is a narrow wide chainring? (I'll google it of course, just never heard of such a thing.) If you can recommend a specific one, please let me know.
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Old 11-12-14, 09:58 PM
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Oh, the chainguard I use is the SKS chainboard. A derailleur can fit under there, so hopefully one of those paul guides can.

I noticed no one seems to advocate using the old derailleur as a guide. Does this not work?
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Old 11-12-14, 10:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Tailor View Post
Oh, the chainguard I use is the SKS chainboard. A derailleur can fit under there, so hopefully one of those paul guides can.

I noticed no one seems to advocate using the old derailleur as a guide. Does this not work?
See the first sentence in post #2 . Andy.
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Old 11-12-14, 11:36 PM
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Ouch, my bad. skim reading fail. I'll probably give that a try first, since I have it already.
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Old 11-13-14, 12:07 AM
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Deda Fang, DOG FANG and a bash guard ?
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Old 11-13-14, 12:21 AM
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I think the thing I didn't say clearly enough, is that I really don't want to lose my current chain guard. its been cut and shaped to fit my bikes wierd geometry, so I cant put it on another bike. And I really like not eevr futzing with pant clips or similar things to keep my jeans out of my chain. But if I can find a bashguard that fits insider the chainboard, that might be a worthy find.
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Old 11-13-14, 09:17 AM
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The recent trendyness of 1x10 or 1x11 drivetrains for Cyclocross and MTB use has led to a bunch of chainrings intended to keep the chain on a single ring. The downside is they are expensive, rather boutique, items and may not be available in the bolt circle and/or tooth count you need.

Plain, old fashion flat chainring with no enhanced shifting aids are still available and will do a lot to keep the chain in place at relatively low cost. Surly sells them in a variety of tooth counts and in common 130 and 110 mm bolt circle form.
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Old 11-13-14, 09:30 AM
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I like their Stainless steel chainrings ** , but I kept snagging old steel chainrings, back in the day,too. so I have steel chainrings on my Touring triple and winter MTB.

friction shifting ,( using technique.. rather than index shifting, the engineering of others.)

** 110, 34t-50t, 130 38-50t.
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Old 11-13-14, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Tailor View Post
What is a narrow wide chainring? (I'll google it of course, just never heard of such a thing.) If you can recommend a specific one, please let me know.
Narrow-wide chainrings are designed for 1xN mountain and cyclo-cross bikes. Some teeth are thicker to prevent any left/right wobble in the chain. The narrow teeth guide the chain into place, and the wide ones hold it there. Wolf Tooth has an excellent reputation in the MTB community. The price range is $50-80 depending on which manufacturer and tooth count.
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Old 11-13-14, 05:58 PM
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In my copy of The Dancing Chain there is a period drawing of an early 1930s bike with a rear derailleur only (rear deraileurs were fairly rare in the early 1930s, front derailleurs were extremely rare), a single chainring and a small chainguide to keep the chain reliably on the chainwheel.

They learned. Cyclists since have learned over and over and over and over...
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Old 11-14-14, 06:06 AM
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I just installed a narrow wide Race Face 30 tooth ring on my bike. It is a Karate Monkey and I am running a 1X9. The low gear is a 30X36 and noy quite low enough for my liking here in WV. I have the 10 speed shifters and rear derailuer. I will do the full conversion soon with a Wolftooth 40 rear cog. I believe that will work for me. There has been quite a few do the conversion around here and had good comments. I will just have to keep an eye on the chain, I think it will wear out faster. Time will tell
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Old 11-14-14, 07:15 AM
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The 40T rear cog will actually be easier on the chain than your current 36. As a general rule, larger cogs and chainrings cause less wear on the chain since it doesn't have to make as tight a bend.
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Old 11-14-14, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by tcs View Post
In my copy of The Dancing Chain there is a period drawing of an early 1930s bike with a rear derailleur only (rear deraileurs were fairly rare in the early 1930s, front derailleurs were extremely rare), a single chainring and a small chainguide to keep the chain reliably on the chainwheel.

They learned. Cyclists since have learned over and over and over and over...
That Tern Mainstay Chain Guide is petty slick an very reasonable.
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