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Very Tight Fork Spacing - Steel

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Very Tight Fork Spacing - Steel

Old 11-30-14, 11:36 AM
  #1  
jgcycle
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Very Tight Fork Spacing - Steel

I had to replace a fork on an old Trek and got this chrome Akisu on the cheap. The inside spacing is only about 92.5 mm and its very difficult to spread the forks to get a wheel in there.

I'm now going to make the move from 27" to 700c and of course its the same with the newer wheel. On top of this, the new wheel has a Chorus hub and on one side the axle is flush or barely inside the fork, but the other side the axle sticks out about <1mm. The fork ends get a little splayed.

I don't feel any of this is right, but probably OK to ride? I know that wheel isn't coming out even if I pop a wheelie, but isn't that too much lateral stress on the fork?

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Old 11-30-14, 12:02 PM
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Looks to me like your photos show different locknuts and washers on each end of the axle.

I would try removing the locknuts to see if that is true. The 2nd photo seems to be showing a thicker locknut and washer combination than photo #3 . Maybe you can find a thinner locknut for the axle end in photo #2 to match photo #3 , and remove the washers to reduce the overall width between the locknuts.
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Old 11-30-14, 12:09 PM
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i agree with above post. address the issue by removing the washers and search out ANY nut that fits that has a lower profile. and even narrower cones could help. if successful, don't be surprised if the axle turns out to be too long and bottoms out too soon.

this does not mean that i necessarily think that it will turn out to be a problem as is.
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Old 11-30-14, 12:17 PM
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If you are able to reduce the space you then merely need to cut or grind down the axle so that it does not protrude beyond the dropouts.
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Old 11-30-14, 12:18 PM
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You might confirm that the hub is 100mm, or a least reasonably close, but the real issue is that the fork is way too narrow.

Look at the photo, and it's obvious that the dropouts aren't even close to parallel. This might be the result of spreading, but looking at the amount they're off, I suspect that they were probably not parallel before spreading.

If you want to keep this fork, consider spreading it properly and bending the dropouts back to parallel. This is a bit trickier on a fork than the rear triangle, but I don't think you have much to lose.

BTW- looking at the fork, it appears that the dropouts are in line with the blades which means that the fork was made wrong. This is correctable, but I have to wonder about the fork, which seems to be seriously crappy.
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Old 11-30-14, 01:26 PM
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There are ft hubs and forks with a factory width/spacing of much less then 100mm. But most all I've seen are on older English of US bikes. I doubt that this fork is for one of those older bikes, likely just squeezed together after manufacturing at some point. Either way it's fairly simple to realign a fork.

I don't agree that the hub's locknuts are different. I think that the orientation of the cones and lock nuts and their wrench flats are deceiving. I do agree that the hub's width needs to be confirmed before any thing else is done.

As to the drop outs being made/brazed in the blades wrong- They just haven't had any aligning done yet. No big deal. Andy.
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Old 11-30-14, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post

As to the drop outs being made/brazed in the blades wrong- They just haven't had any aligning done yet. No big deal. Andy.
Yes, it is correctable, and I suggested that the OP do that after spreading the fork. OTOH- squaring the dropouts is part and parcel of making a fork, so the manufacturer's delivery of the fork in semi-finished condition isn't encouraging. The problem isn't the blades, dropout material or brazing, it's a failure in the totality of the job. It's akin ot a bike shop taking money to install a derailleur, then mounting it and attaching the cable, but not adjusting trim or limits.
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Old 11-30-14, 02:38 PM
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Originally Posted by jgcycle View Post
I had to replace a fork on an old Trek and got this chrome Akisu on the cheap. The inside spacing is only about 92.5 mm and its very difficult to spread the forks to get a wheel in there.

I'm now going to make the move from 27" to 700c and of course its the same with the newer wheel. On top of this, the new wheel has a Chorus hub and on one side the axle is flush or barely inside the fork, but the other side the axle sticks out about <1mm. The fork ends get a little splayed.

I don't feel any of this is right, but probably OK to ride? I know that wheel isn't coming out even if I pop a wheelie, but isn't that too much lateral stress on the fork?

It's not OK to ride as is. The dropouts are not parallel, as said above, so when you tighten the QR the axle will be stressed and misaligned.
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Old 11-30-14, 04:46 PM
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Upon close inspection both sides of the hub use the same locknuts and washer. One side has 3 threads showing and the other 4. No calipers but the hub with ruler is very close to 100mm, nothing way off.

OK thanks, I'll check out doing something with this fork and have an eye out for a quality replacement. I won't be riding this one.
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