Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Quick Release Lever question.

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Quick Release Lever question.

Old 12-05-14, 01:38 PM
  #1  
IndianaRecRider
LET'S RIDE!!
Thread Starter
 
IndianaRecRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Northwest Indiana
Posts: 1,732

Bikes: 2013 Fuji Absolute 1.4

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 176 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quick Release Lever question.

Stupid question of the day (probably of the week for that matter), and I apologize if this is in the wrong forum. Wasn't sure if I should post it here or in General Discussions (Mechanics won out).

As you straddle your bike and look down at your front wheel, which side of the fork (and please don't say "outside" LOL), should the QR lever be on, the left or right? Or does it really matter?

Thanks in advance.

IndianaRecRider is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 01:52 PM
  #2  
Yan 
BeaverTerror
 
Yan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Shanghai, China
Posts: 2,005

Bikes: 1995 Kestrel 4000; 2013 True North Touring; 1989 Miele Tivoli; 1979 Colnago Sport

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 381 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Left, to stay consistent with the rear, where the derailleur is on the right.
__________________
Yan
Yan is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 01:54 PM
  #3  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 20,148

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 99 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1584 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Tradition says the left (non-drive) side, but in practice it doesn't matter.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 01:57 PM
  #4  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,049

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4331 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Yan View Post
Left, to stay consistent with the rear, where the derailleur is on the right.
+1, It really doesn't matter on the front, but might as well keep it on the left to match the rear.

Rear levers almost always have to be on the left because of clearance issues with the RD upper body. Likewise clearance should be the guiding factor in front. In most cases there won't be any issue, so left it is. But in the rare event a fender brace or front rack leg is in the way, feel free to abandon consistency in favor of ease of use.

Also feel free to have the QR lever on the right if something like a hand injury makes it easier for you that way. Just learn to ignore all those "your front QR is backward" comments you're likely to draw.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 02:03 PM
  #5  
DiabloScott
It's MY mountain
 
DiabloScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Mt.Diablo
Posts: 8,501

Bikes: Klein, Merckx, Trek

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Sometimes drive side's OK on the rear also.

DiabloScott is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 05:21 PM
  #6  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 11,374

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1652 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
As mentioned traditional lever placement is on the LH side, ft and rr. But with disk brakes many will put the levers on the non rotor side, the RH side. It doesn't really matter. Andy.
Andrew R Stewart is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 05:57 PM
  #7  
IndianaRecRider
LET'S RIDE!!
Thread Starter
 
IndianaRecRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Northwest Indiana
Posts: 1,732

Bikes: 2013 Fuji Absolute 1.4

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 176 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for the replies everyone, I really appreciate the info.

IndianaRecRider is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 07:37 PM
  #8  
CroMo Mike 
Senior Member
 
CroMo Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 1,238

Bikes: Listed in my signature.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 94 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Guys used to put the front one on the right and situate the release lever close behind the fork leg to make it a little less likely to get hung up in someone else's spokes in an accident. I always thought that was a "stretch" so I didn't do it that way.
__________________
My C&V Bikes:
1972 Bottecchia Professional, 1987 Bottecchia Team C-Record, 1982 Colnago Super,
1995 Bianchi Campione d'Italia, 1995 DeBernardi Thron Super Record
CroMo Mike is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 08:52 PM
  #9  
ClarkinHawaii
Senior Member
 
ClarkinHawaii's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Wahiawa. Oahu
Posts: 1,701
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by CroMo Mike View Post
Guys used to put the front one on the right and situate the release lever close behind the fork leg to make it a little less likely to get hung up in someone else's spokes in an accident. I always thought that was a "stretch" so I didn't do it that way.
I'll bite--why is the lever on the right hand side close behind the fork leg less likely to get hung up on somebody else's spokes than a lever on the left side close behind the fork leg?
ClarkinHawaii is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 09:02 PM
  #10  
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 31,343

Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1089 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ClarkinHawaii View Post
I'll bite--why is the lever on the right hand side close behind the fork leg less likely to get hung up on somebody else's spokes than a lever on the left side close behind the fork leg?
Because you can't arrange it that way on the left. Look at your front wheel and you'll see the flag cannot be positioned vertically behind the fork blade, only in front of it. On the right you can set it vertically behind the fork leg. Does it make any difference or contribute to safety? Well, the next time you hear a real instance of a qr flag getting caught in someone else's spokes, let me know.
HillRider is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 09:19 PM
  #11  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,049

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4331 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Because you can't arrange it that way on the left. Look at your front wheel and you'll see the flag cannot be positioned vertically behind the fork blade, only in front of it. On the right you can set it vertically behind the fork leg. Does it make any difference or contribute to safety? Well, the next time you hear a real instance of a qr flag getting caught in someone else's spokes, let me know.
Note that this only apples to an internal cam QR unit with the lever offset from the centerline. The central levers of external cam and some like old school Simplex, or Mavic skewers don't care.

Also, when the major makers curved the levers in response to CPSC rules (40+ years ago), the issue if snagging a skewer went away. Most of us were very happy to close the lever forward of an parallel to the fork blade, and I don't know of any case of getting one snagged and opened.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 09:26 PM
  #12  
ClarkinHawaii
Senior Member
 
ClarkinHawaii's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Wahiawa. Oahu
Posts: 1,701
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
actually, I've always been under the impression that the lever was supposed to be pointing backwards, so that if you ride too close and snag a bush or twig or something, it would not open the lever.
ClarkinHawaii is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 09:59 PM
  #13  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,049

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4331 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ClarkinHawaii View Post
actually, I've always been under the impression that the lever was supposed to be pointing backwards, so that if you ride too close and snag a bush or twig or something, it would not open the lever.
BITD, when the likes of Coppi and Eddie Mercxx were riding the QRs were closed as you asked, Parallel to the ground and pointing back. Some free thinkers, closed the rear skewer upside down and pointing forward below the rear dropout.

Once they were curved ti meet CPSC requirements, a new style evolved and the upside down/forward arrangement become dominant, and the front was closed forward and paallel, with the blade itself protecting it.

Whenever I teach about QR's, I don't get into specific "right" ways, but instead tell people to close the lever so it's near a frame part for security, but not directly over it so that they can easily get their fingers behind when time comes to open it. I close my road bike's Campy internal skewers as I described, pointing forward in back, and up in front of the fork. But I close the rear external cam skewer on the commuter across the dropout and into the gap between the chain and seat stays.

To anyone wanting to know the "right" way, I still say, whatever works best for you, balancing security and ease of use, just don't jam it against the tubes, so you need a crowbar to get it open.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

Last edited by FBinNY; 12-05-14 at 10:23 PM.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 12-05-14, 10:16 PM
  #14  
ClarkinHawaii
Senior Member
 
ClarkinHawaii's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Wahiawa. Oahu
Posts: 1,701
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm convinced.
ClarkinHawaii is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.