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What's YOUR special recurring bike maintenance injury?

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What's YOUR special recurring bike maintenance injury?

Old 01-07-15, 12:18 AM
  #1  
Beth W
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What's YOUR special recurring bike maintenance injury?

I'm a relative newbie who can't seem to learn not to pull the bike-pump nozzle off the valve without bashing my knuckles into my spokes and bruising the middle knuckle of my right-hand middle finger. Every time it's on the verge of healing, I re-bruise it. Someday I'll learn.

Ow.

Anyone else have a recurring injury they get from bike maintenance?
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Old 01-07-15, 07:12 AM
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Keep some gloves handy near the pump. I use them for anything involving pedals, cranks or bottom brackets.
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Old 01-07-15, 08:56 AM
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I can't think of any maintenance injuries, although I surely have pinched myself, or taken a chunk of skin off sometime, perhaps with a wrench slipping. However, once or twice is enough to change the procedures.

Just learn to modulate your force when removing stuff like your pump. I do a lot of my routine pumping the tires using my frame pump, and probably don't have my fingers in the spokes, except when holding the pump head.

With other pumps, I usually use the little screw-on presta to schrader adapters.

Just for curiosity, are your wheels laced so that the big opening is above the valve? The two spokes around the valve should run essentially parallel. There will be lots of notes on the web about this with wheel building.

See the note under "Boxing the Valve"
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Old 01-07-15, 09:55 AM
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Occasionally get scratched by cog or chainring teeth if I'm not careful.
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Old 01-07-15, 10:07 AM
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Not recurring, but things I especially hate:

- stabbing myself with a wire from a frayed cable.
- hitting chainrings with the back of my hand.
- getting a fingertip caught between the disk spider and brake caliper.
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Old 01-07-15, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by mconlonx View Post
Not recurring, but things I especially hate:

- stabbing myself with a wire from a frayed cable.
It's about the only one I get sometimes.
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Old 01-07-15, 11:47 AM
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.
...my pride gets regularly wounded.
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Old 01-07-15, 12:10 PM
  #8  
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Originally Posted by Beth W View Post
I'm a relative newbie who can't seem to learn not to pull the bike-pump nozzle off the valve without bashing my knuckles into my spokes and bruising the middle knuckle of my right-hand middle finger. Every time it's on the verge of healing, I re-bruise it. Someday I'll learn.

Anyone else have a recurring injury they get from bike maintenance?
No offense intended, but maybe you're a slow learner. (at least in this instance).

We all get injuries from time to time, including when working on bikes. Some things tend to be more problematic, such as frayed cables, or razor sharp chainring teeth, but repeated injuries represents a failure to learn and adapt.

patient to Doc. "It hurts whenever I move my arm like this"
Doc to patient, "stop moving your arm like that" ------(rim shot)

If you repeatedly bark your knuckles pulling your pump head off, consider stopping that, and push the head off instead. Wrap your hands around the tire and push the head off with your thumb. Likewise with anythong else that causes injuries, change hand position, wear gloves, pull vs push, and so on. In short adapt and adjust.
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Old 01-07-15, 12:25 PM
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My biggest one is probably frayed cables, which I make every effort to avoid on my own bikes, but fixing other people's is always a minefield. Tetanus, anyone?

All my other injuries are one-time only, generally because they resulted from me doing stuff without thinking and were sufficiently painful that I'm reminded not to do whatever it was again. If anyone's curious, notable examples of those include taking a chunk out of one of my hands with a set of cable cutters and crushing a finger between a crank arm and a workstand while removing a stuck pedal.
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Old 01-07-15, 12:45 PM
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One rare but potentially serious injury can be a hazard for those who work on a wide variety of bikes including some older ones, say a shop mechanic or Bike Co-Op mechanic.

The now obsolete Shimano Front Freewheel (FFS) drive system used a fixed rear hub and had the freewheeling mechanism in the crank. With the common rear freewheeling bike when you stop turning the crank the chain also stops moving. With the FFS when you turn the crank to adjust the brakes, shifting or whatever and get the rear wheel spinning, stopping the crank does NOT stop the chain. A mechanic used to a conventional system can get his hand drawn into the cogs or chainring if he tries to work on these drivetrains and doesn't realize the chain is moving.

I thought this worth mentioning because I recently read on Bike Rumors that a French company has announced a reintroduction of this FFS-type drive and they may be coming back. Here is the article:

Found: HXR Easy Shift Drivetrain Hints Fixed Gear is the New Enduro
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Old 01-07-15, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
No offense intended, but maybe you're a slow learner. (at least in this instance).
I am totally a slow learner when it comes to mechanical stuff. But I don't mind laughing at myself about it. Helps me from taking things too seriously and encourages me to keep trying.
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Old 01-07-15, 01:30 PM
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to the OP, maybe you can push the nozzle on the valve stem less deeply. I find the nozzle doesn't have to to be connected as tightly as I once thought. when it's on "just enough" it comes off more easily. anyway, that's what I do
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Old 01-07-15, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
The now obsolete Shimano Front Freewheel (FFS) drive system used a fixed rear hub and had the freewheeling mechanism in the crank.
I've read about the Autobike that does that too which allows it to shift automatically even if the rider stops pedalling. I think they still make them, although I've never seen one first-hand.
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Old 01-07-15, 05:37 PM
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I used to gash my knuckles while loosening crank fixing bolts. This was long ago when I worked as a shop mechanic. Every single knuckle on every single finger had a scar on it. I was a very slow learner. I don't injure myself that way any more.
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Old 01-07-15, 05:41 PM
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Getting poked by the occasional frayed wire is mine. Although my back issues stem from the time I caught an old English 3spd that fell off of my workstand.
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Old 01-07-15, 06:39 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
The now obsolete Shimano Front Freewheel (FFS) drive system used a fixed rear hub and had the freewheeling mechanism in the crank. With the common rear freewheeling bike when you stop turning the crank the chain also stops moving. With the FFS when you turn the crank to adjust the brakes, shifting or whatever and get the rear wheel spinning, stopping the crank does NOT stop the chain. A mechanic used to a conventional system can get his hand drawn into the cogs or chainring if he tries to work on these drivetrains and doesn't realize the chain is moving.
My Schwinn "World Tourist" had that system when my dad found it in the trash. I said to myself: "What were they thinking?" then tore it all off and threw it in the trash. The frame still serves me today.

What were they thinking?
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Old 01-07-15, 08:41 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
I've read about the Autobike that does that too which allows it to shift automatically even if the rider stops pedalling. I think they still make them, although I've never seen one first-hand.
I've seen a couple first hand and, trust me, you haven't missed anything worthwhile.
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Old 01-07-15, 08:53 PM
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I use a brass wire wheel on a drill to clean off corrosion and rust on parts. Boy, when that thing slips it takes a few layers of skin off the dorsal surface of my thumb. What's even worse is having it happen twice on the same day.
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Old 01-07-15, 09:00 PM
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I tend to hit my head on the other bikes hanging from the ceiling while raising up after inflating tires on the bike I am taking out for a ride.
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Old 01-07-15, 09:19 PM
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Rash from getting my panties in a twist over lawyer lips.
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Old 01-07-15, 09:26 PM
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Originally Posted by mconlonx View Post
- stabbing myself with a wire from a frayed cable.
This! Bonus points if it gets you right under a fingernail, or if there is one rogue strand that gets you surprise outta nowhere when you're not even working on the brake or wheel.

I have a nice scar on my forearm from carelessly removing a drive side pedal- I wasn't cut, per se, a tooth just removed a long narrow stripe of skin and scarred over. A mistake made once and only once.

Can't say I've ever stuck my finger in a disc. What kind of dummy does that? (Haha sorry )
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Old 01-07-15, 09:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Beth W View Post
I'm a relative newbie who can't seem to learn not to pull the bike-pump nozzle off the valve without bashing my knuckles into my spokes and bruising the middle knuckle of my right-hand middle finger. Every time it's on the verge of healing, I re-bruise it.
Oh man! That's my favorite finger.
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Old 01-07-15, 09:53 PM
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It wasn't really an injury, but I broke almost all of my fingernails building my first wheel plucking the spokes to sound for tension. I didn't think I would be able to build the second wheel, but a little research on this board revealed that some people use a guitar pick to pluck the spokes. It worked like a charm.
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Old 01-07-15, 10:03 PM
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I always get a sore back. No matter how I position the bike, or if I say, Self, don't do any extreme bending over!, I usually forget and start bending over doing stuff until my back starts hurting.
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Old 01-07-15, 10:06 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I used to gash my knuckles while loosening crank fixing bolts. This was long ago when I worked as a shop mechanic. Every single knuckle on every single finger had a scar on it. I was a very slow learner. I don't injure myself that way any more.
Oh yeah, chainring bolts. I try to avoid hurting my knuckles on the first couple; by the last couple I'm just expecting the pain.
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